#1
Hey guys,
I just wanted to record some random stuff (just for fun) with a very easy mini sweep/legato pattern (8th notes @ 110bpm). After recording I realized I can't skip really fluent between the strings
Do you guys have any tips or excercises for me to improve that?

Thanks in advance!


Ah, and I've been playing for around 1,5yrs.
#3
also figure out whether it's your left hand or your right hand that's the issue. you can do that by muting the strings with your right hand and just playing your sweeps as hammerons to see if you're doing them right before you start adding the picking
#4
slow it down to where you can play it fluently and then slowly speed up while you practice
#5
Yes.

First thing when picking up your guitar, devote at least 15 - 30 minutes to practicing one of these exercises:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/guitar-finger-exercises/

I recommend you choose exercise 1 or 2.

Then read this article on how to sweep pick properly : http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/sweep-picking-exercises/


In your free time you should devote 30 minutes to yourself so that you read at least the first 2 chapters from my free ebook.

It is important to understand:
1. The mental process of achieving guitar mastery (or at least your " guitar mastery" concept for that matter).

2. The concept of muscle memory. Muscle memory if the most essential concept to understand and apply when it comes to guitar technique

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/


Good luck
#6
This isn't going to be a popular idea, but I swear to you that it works. I know a lot of scary guitar players who admit to having done this a lot when they were developing their chops.

Don't do this in around people; they will cringe.

Basically, just play both very slowly, as you're doing now, but also very quickly - way beyond what you're capable of playing cleanly. Think of it as wind sprints for your hands.

Obviously, you want to keep your wrists and elbows just as relaxed, even if it does sound like nonsense. Do I really need to state that? I hope not.

The benefit of this silliness is discovering that some hand motions, strangely, are easier to do quick than slow. When we sweep slowly, our wrists are highly tempted to pick each note individually, and often tense up straining not to do so. It hurts, and it's not fun. By attempting (and probably failing) to just fly, we familiarize our wrists with the smooth sweeping motion that the technique is named after.
#7
Quote by Daimoth
This isn't going to be a popular idea, but I swear to you that it works. I know a lot of scary guitar players who admit to having done this a lot when they were developing their chops.

Don't do this in around people; they will cringe.

Basically, just play both very slowly, as you're doing now, but also very quickly - way beyond what you're capable of playing cleanly. Think of it as wind sprints for your hands.

Obviously, you want to keep your wrists and elbows just as relaxed, even if it does sound like nonsense. Do I really need to state that? I hope not.

The benefit of this silliness is discovering that some hand motions, strangely, are easier to do quick than slow. When we sweep slowly, our wrists are highly tempted to pick each note individually, and often tense up straining not to do so. It hurts, and it's not fun. By attempting (and probably failing) to just fly, we familiarize our wrists with the smooth sweeping motion that the technique is named after.


This is true - you make small changes without realizing it when you play faster. It's good to try things fast to see what those changes are and keep the ones that are useful while acknowledging what is not so you can remove them.
#8
I find sweeping MUCH easier at faster speeds. However, you really do need to just practice slow as hell with a metronome and only increase the speed after you can play it totally fluently, without mistakes. Takes a while, but practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.