#1
ok, so if im every playing somthing in the minor scale i always think in the key of A, even if its G, F, Fb or whatever. Am i the only person that deoes this?
#4
well, C major can be mistaken by A minor, since both scales got the exactly same notes (just a different root note).
When I play, I try to make sure that the true root note is in my head, so I don't mess up and go off the scale/key.
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
Perhaps because the shapes are the same?

I think in whatever scale I'm playing.

well im not going to think in A minor shape if im using the phrygian mode :p
#7
Haha ye I'm the same, I think it's because I mainly use pentatonics and I first learned them in the key of A.
#8
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Well itll sound fine :shrugs:
Say if you play on C Major, but conclude to E, you end up playing with accidentals that give you a suggestion of E Phrygian

I dont think it works like that
#9
I don't get it. Are you talking about the fretboard or is the random music playing in your head always in the key of A?
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#10
Quote by NewYngwie
ok, so if im every playing somthing in the minor scale i always think in the key of A, even if its G, F, Fb or whatever. Am i the only person that deoes this?


You're probably not the only person, but I wouldn't use that to justify it. Definitely try to think of each key as the key that it actually is.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by z4twenny
I dont think it works like that


E Phrygian has the same notes as C Major. In a modal context, its a mode. But in a tonal setting, its basically E Major with accidentals.

Take a C Major scale, play it but resolve to E, you get E major + accidentals. It wont sound modal unless the chord progression youre playing on has extended chords such that it can only be played on E Phrygian, and unless you try emphasising the notes that differentiate E Phrygian from E Major. If it doesnt have these features, then its just suggestive play.


Unless my theory is very very wrong?
#13
Quote by NewYngwie
ok, so if im every playing somthing in the minor scale i always think in the key of A, even if its G, F, Fb or whatever. Am i the only person that deoes this?


I suspect that this thread has spun off into a rather useless mode discussion because it's not at all clear what you mean by thinking in the key of A.

Could you go into more detail or give us an example so we can give you helpful feedback?
#14
Quote by GS LEAD 5
E Phrygian has the same notes as C Major. In a modal context, its a mode. But in a tonal setting, its basically E Major with accidentals.

Take a C Major scale, play it but resolve to E, you get E major + accidentals. It wont sound modal unless the chord progression youre playing on has extended chords such that it can only be played on E Phrygian, and unless you try emphasising the notes that differentiate E Phrygian from E Major. If it doesnt have these features, then its just suggestive play.


Unless my theory is very very wrong?

Modality is suggested by the underlying harmony. I wasnt trying to hijack this thread though, i just wanted to make sure some random noob didnt get the wrong idea about modes.
#16
Quote by GS LEAD 5
So is my theory wrong?

Well c major is c d e f g a b, those notes in e would e f g a b c d. Why would those groupings of notes sound major?
#17
I've written 3 or 4 songs that I think are super awesome and original, etc., and they all turn out to be in Em/Gmaj.
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#18
Quote by z4twenny
Well c major is c d e f g a b, those notes in e would e f g a b c d. Why would those groupings of notes sound major?


Oops mistake, E Minor with the F# replaced with an F. That would be E Phrygian if the context is modal.
#19
If you're playing in X Minor, but regardless you call all the notes as the notes in Y Minor, then you really need to rethink your playing.

Its like when people downtune their guitars and still refer to the notes as EADGBe, instead of DGCFAD or whatever. Learn the actual notes you're playing, don't just superimpose another scale over it by starting on a different tonic.

Someone wanted me to learn "Wonderwall", and they brought up an instructional vid with the chords. Dude was in standard tuning with a Capo at the 2nd fret, and refered to all notes as if he was in standard with the capo as the nut.

"Ok, starts with Em7 and then goes into A7, ect..."

I play it without a capo, and I was like, "The hell is up?" I listen more closely, and the guy is playing everything a Wholestep up without transposing chord names.

Point is, learn the actual notes and not just the patterns, it will help you immensely.
#22
Quote by GS LEAD 5
^Thats what happens when you play in Drop Z.



It's vot zee germans call B flat
#24
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Oops mistake, E Minor with the F# replaced with an F. That would be E Phrygian if the context is modal.

Indeed, i figured it probably was. Basically yes if the context / harmony implies modality then it would be e phrygian.
#25
I always thing in E for pentatonics/blues and C for major and A for minor.

A for minor because it is same notes as C major and E pentatonics because it was how i first learned it before I knew what diffrent keys were.
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#26
Quote by NewYngwie
ok, so if im every playing somthing in the minor scale i always think in the key of A, even if its G, F, Fb or whatever. Am i the only person that deoes this?

Depends on the style of music.
#27
Quote by Twidler
It's vot zee germans call B flat



German H = American B
German B = American Bb
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#28
Quote by Flibo


German H = American B
German B = American Bb



Probably, it's been a while since I was at college lol
#30
Quote by HotspurJr
I thought it was more of a scandinavian thing than an German thing.



No idea, I got it from a little german man who took the theory class and played piano for the queen lol. He was pretty amazin on that thing but looked a bit like crusty the clown so it was hard to concentrate.
#31
Quote by HotspurJr
I thought it was more of a scandinavian thing than an German thing.

You might be right. I just used those countries for the sake of the example; I didn't feel like listing them all up.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#32
I think it's a tendency for metal players to play in Em/Gmaj because many riffs work off of the open notes where the root is an E. If the guitar is tuned to D standard, then it would be Dm/Fmaj, but it's the exact same fretboard pattern. Many of my songs are based of Em/Gmaj scales of whatever variety because of this. I really like complex pull offs and taps, which this scale does well. I've been trying to get away from this as it tends to get old if you do it too much.

I would say if you base a lot of stuff off of Amin to learn some different chord progressions that you like and base some lead work or whatever off of that. Different guitar tunings will help you get away from this too.
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#33
Quote by Flibo


German H = American B
German B = American Bb


ABSOLUTELY OFF TOPIC.

i heard from my theory/band teacher that Bach once wrote a song based around the melody Bb, A, C, B. So in German...it's BACH! clever


On topic now....
I'm not positive if I understand your question too clearly. But I personally get stuck in the key of G a lot. whenever I'm listening to a song (withOUT my guitar) and trying to figure out the chord progression, I always imagine myself playing the chords as if it's in G. Then when I go to my guitar later (this usually happens in the car, at the store, etc) I just find what key it actually is in and I already know what the progression is.


Quote by Life Is Brutal
If you're playing in X Minor, but regardless you call all the notes as the notes in Y Minor, then you really need to rethink your playing.

Its like when people downtune their guitars and still refer to the notes as EADGBe, instead of DGCFAD or whatever. Learn the actual notes you're playing, don't just superimpose another scale over it by starting on a different tonic.

Someone wanted me to learn "Wonderwall", and they brought up an instructional vid with the chords. Dude was in standard tuning with a Capo at the 2nd fret, and refered to all notes as if he was in standard with the capo as the nut.

"Ok, starts with Em7 and then goes into A7, ect..."

I play it without a capo, and I was like, "The hell is up?" I listen more closely, and the guy is playing everything a Wholestep up without transposing chord names.

Point is, learn the actual notes and not just the patterns, it will help you immensely.


I used to be that way. As an example, there is a guy who tabbed out P!ATD's Pretty.Odd. album in DGCFAD (the way it's played), but named the chords as what they actually are as opposed to the chord shapes. I remember hating it so much because I wasn't able to understand it.
But now I've learned to read and hear chords as their actual name, no matter the tuning. Honestly, it makes life so much easier for me, because it's easy to play a song no matter what tuning I'm in, or to find easier ways to play certain chord progressions.
long reply just to say I agree, definitely annoying