#1
Hi, I´m learning the pentatonic scale - the minor and the major version of it Well it´s the same version but with different roots And I can´t quite understand that for example - I´ve got a jamtrack that´s repeating let´s say an A major chord, so it´s in the key of A so I should solo over it with a A major pentatonic, right? And my second question, let´s have a jam with an A minor chord, should I solo over it with the A minor pentatonic or is the A major pentatonic still usable? And my third question, you´ve got a song in a key, let´s say key of G so you solo over it with a G major pentatonic? Thanks for your help
#2
The pentatonic is interesting.

You can use the minor pentatonic over either a major or minor chord progression.

Over major chords, you'll get a blues sound. Minor-pentatonic-over-major-chords is probably the first situation most people learn to solo with.

To my ear, the major pentatonic works less well over a minor chord progression, but your mileage may vary.

The key is to LISTEN. Use those things on either side of your head. What sounds good to you? You should always be listening to how what you're playing interacts with the jam track? (And, in fact, I think it's often a good idea to record your own jam tracks because it's usually easier to tell what's going on with them.).
#3
Thanks, I´ll try to work on that And just so I don´t get everything confused, the major and minor pentatonic is the same with the exception of the position of the roots?
#4
agreed with first guy who replied.....it could be a major pentatonic over amajor progression,or a minor over a minor progression,yet sometimes a minor pentatonic sounds better over a major progression then a major pentatonic.....gotta use you ear alot,i see it alot in blues or old classic rock,like creedance clearwater....sometimes its a major progressiong (a for example) yet instead of a major pentatonic you would play a minor,wich is the same shape just slid down a few frets,or up....depending if your looking at the fretboard of what the highest tone is or what is vertically higher....weird.just use your ear man,and keep examing everything you do and make mental notes of what works and what doesnt for the future.your on the right track.
#5
Quote by winprog15
Thanks, I´ll try to work on that And just so I don´t get everything confused, the major and minor pentatonic is the same with the exception of the position of the roots?



Yeh Em = G major etc, relative major and minor. I love the pentatonic.
#6
Quote by winprog15
Thanks, I´ll try to work on that And just so I don´t get everything confused, the major and minor pentatonic is the same with the exception of the position of the roots?


Uh. ... Kind of.

Each minor pentatonic shares the same notes as a different major pentatonic. These are called "relative" majors and minors.

C maj = Am
G maj = Em
F maj = Dm

Count down four frets from the major, and you get the relative minor.
#7
Quote by winprog15
Thanks, I´ll try to work on that And just so I don´t get everything confused, the major and minor pentatonic is the same with the exception of the position of the roots?

If you are thinking of them purely as scale shapes, then yes, they are basically the same. But other than that, they are very different. The scale formula for the major pentatonic is 1 2 3 5 6, while the scale formula for the minor pentatonic is 1 b3 4 5 b7. They are related because they are relative to each other, the same way that Am is the relative minor of C.
So if you're using a jam track in the major key, you're really using the major pentatonic. If it's in a minor key, you're using the minor pentatonic. You can use either scale shape, but musically you are using one or the other.
In blues and rock, it's common to solo using the minor pentatonic over a major chord progression. You're still in a major key, but the accidentals that you are using (notes not in the major scale) still sound good. This has to do with the fact that if you take the roots and b7ths of the three chords in the twelve bar blues and combined them, you would get the minor pentatonic scale.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Oct 29, 2011,
#8
Thank you guys for such a help, it´s clearer to me now And If I may just another question How to find out in what key a song is? Let´s take an example - a song with chords Bbm,Fsharp,Ab first I found this chart http://guitarteacher.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/majorscalechords.gif and what I did was that I trasposed the chords one half step higher so they became Bm,G and A and I looked it up in the chart and it said that it´s the key of D .. so I tried soloing over the song with the Db (Csharp) major scale and it sounded good to my ear .. is this method okay?
#9
The best way is to use your ear. Where does the chord progression sound resolved, as in where does your ear not want to travel anymore?
Play C - G - F - G over and over again. On what chord does your ear not want to continue going? Where does it feel at home?

With experience, you can identify keys by looking at the chords. If most of the chords belong to a certain key and ends with a V - I or IV - I cadence, then you can take a reasonable guess at what the key is. Some people say the key is always the first chord of a song, but that is far from true. People only say that because is most cases, especially in popular songs, the root is the first chord played.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK