#1
Which one do you prefer and why?

I used to own an SM57 and a Fast Track Ultra but sold them to fund my current guitar. Now I'm thinking about buying another recording set up. I could get away with not much money if I bought eg. a Line6 POD HD(3-500) which I'm thinking about currently. Any friends of "regular" recording want to argue against this?

The reason I'm pretty much looking at digital stuff is that it seems much more simple. Also with my old set up I used to have this latency-kinda problem that no one here could give an answer to, neither could one of my friends who really knows this kinda stuff and records a lot and studies about musical recording.

How about tonalities. Which one would you say gave me a better recording? Keep in mind that I'm pretty much a n00b at this, allthough I do have some experience. Its not that I couldn't dial in a good tone, but the recording (if using a real amp).

Argue.
#2
You'd have latency issues either way. Regardless of how you record, when digital there will always be a 2 ms latency issue.

It really honestly depends on what you want to do with the recordings. If you just want them for your own use (getting ideas down, sharing with a handful of people, etc) then the digital stuff will probably be fine. But you can not beat actually throwing a mic onto an amp... If you want good quality, regardless of which route you go down you'll end up spending a lot of money. But you can bet better results with a 57 then by digitally processing your signal.

Just my two cents.
#4
Both can sound good. Depends on the person using them actually.
With a modeller, youll spend more time tweaking the amp model for the sweet spot, while with an actual tube amp, you spend more time tweaking the micing(all the hard work micing wise is already done for you thanks to the mic sims on the pod. Mind you, using third party impulses like Guitarhacks or Redwires usually sounds much better).

TLDR
MFX Pros- Simple, versatile, portable, quiet
Cons- Needs MUCH more tweaking than a real amp to sound good

Old fashioned way
Pros- Less time spend on amp tweaking, fun, "if it aint broke, dont fix it"
Cons- Room plays a big role, mic positions arent easy to replicate- even a slightly different position will get you a different sound.


Quote by scimitar_255
You'd have latency issues either way. Regardless of how you record, when digital there will always be a 2 ms latency issue.

It really honestly depends on what you want to do with the recordings. If you just want them for your own use (getting ideas down, sharing with a handful of people, etc) then the digital stuff will probably be fine. But you can not beat actually throwing a mic onto an amp... If you want good quality, regardless of which route you go down you'll end up spending a lot of money. But you can bet better results with a 57 then by digitally processing your signal.

Just my two cents.



Depends on what modeller you use actually. If youre using a basic 200 dollar MFX, then a rel mic will always sound better. But something like an Axe or an 11R with the right settings can easily be on par, and even surpass a real mic at times.

This is more a personal preference thing rather than a concrete one is better than the other case


Quote by ShevanelFlip
Interface are used to convert analog signal into digital so therefore you don't really make sense...



The POD is a modeller and interface rolled into one.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 30, 2011,
#5
Both ways are digital.

I prefer micing up my amp. Bear in mind, however, I have a pretty good tube amp with an attenuator, and as I live in a house, I can turn it up a bit. This simply isn't the case for many people.

1. If I had a Line 6 Spider, or something like that, I would use a VST amp. No matter what.
2. If I lived in an apartment, I wouldn't bother micing up my amp. Being a good neighbor requires some sacrifices.
3. If my amp was too loud to be recorded with a good tone in my house, I would use a VST.

It all depends on your circumstances.

EDIT: Micing an amp gives you infinite options as to how you capture your tone, and I personally just find it more... fun.

Also, you can't quite beat a tube tone.
Last edited by Kevin19 at Oct 30, 2011,
#6
Your Fast Track was digital. They are essentially the same thing, just one has your effects built in and the other has it in your computer. If you record DIs from the POD and apply POD Farm as a VST in your DAW, they are the same thing.

I'm pretty sure the POD HD has an XLR input on it, so I assume you could send the dry signal to your computer and mic an amp with it as well. The preamps are probably horrible, but they are on the Fast Track as well.

As to whether they'll give you a better recording, it really depends on your skill level. As someone who's not too experienced in recording, I'm sure you'll find using the hardware interface of the POD over the computer interface of the Fast Track easier to get your results, because you're actually moving physical knobs and can hear the difference while you play. In the end, you could get similar results with either, it's just all about how well you know how to use what you're given.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
Last edited by MatrixClaw at Oct 30, 2011,
#7
Quote by MatrixClaw
Your Fast Track was digital. They are essentially the same thing, just one has your effects built in and the other has it in your computer. If you record DIs from the POD and apply POD Farm as a VST in your DAW, they are the same thing.

I'm pretty sure the POD HD has an XLR input on it, so I assume you could send the dry signal to your computer and mic an amp with it as well. The preamps probably are horrible, but they are on the Fast Track as well.

As to whether they'll give you a better recording, it really depends on your skill level. As someone who's not too experienced in recording, I'm sure you'll find using the hardware interface of the POD over the computer interface of the Fast Track to get your results, because you're actually moving physical knobs and can hear the difference while you play. In the end, you could get similar results with either, it's just all about how well you know how to use what you're given.



Cant put it better myself- both micing and using an MFX depend about 90% of the way in your skills at micing/tweaking. And IIRC only the rack PODs have XLR ins?
#8
As well as looking at the software options, it's worth considering use of a multitracker as your DAW.

They're often far simpler to use than software, can be purchased at reasonable costs (assuming the 3-500 you mentioned is your budget, that would be more than enough to buy some high quality used kit) and provide all the main functionality of software recording packages assuming you don't use things like virtual synth packages etc.

They can create excellent quality results, just as good as the average home recording artist would achieve using software.

Some of them also include drum machines, and some like the Zoom R series are designed so they can also be hooked up to your PC if you still wanted to use a software DAW for the final mix to add in any virtual instruments you felt were needed.
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#9
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Cant put it better myself- both micing and using an MFX depend about 90% of the way in your skills at micing/tweaking. And IIRC only the rack PODs have XLR ins?

The HD500 has one, just checked. Not sure on the others in the series. Pretty sure the X3 has an XLR input as well.

I've never seen XLR recording discussed with them, but I assume you can send a dry signal to the computer, just as you can with the 1/4" inputs?
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#10
Thanks a lot guys!

Now I guess I'm gonna ask this:

Which way would be easier for me (a beginner)?
#11
Quote by fc89konkari
Thanks a lot guys!

Now I guess I'm gonna ask this:

Which way would be easier for me (a beginner)?

I usually get moaned at for saying this, but the easiest way for a beginner to get started is with a multitracker.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#12
Quote by MatrixClaw
The HD500 has one, just checked. Not sure on the others in the series. Pretty sure the X3 has an XLR input as well.

I've never seen XLR recording discussed with them, but I assume you can send a dry signal to the computer, just as you can with the 1/4" inputs?


My RP500 sends a dry signal if I hit the bypass button, or if I manually disable all modelling. The POD should do the same? Ive never tried recording with one, so cant really tell should, since I cant imagine XLR being used for guitar.

I wonder how vocals will sound through one?


EDIT: Just googled it, you can use a mic, but only use mics that dont need phantom power.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 30, 2011,
#14
Why not a UX2? Gives you Line 6 amp modeling so you don't need a mic but still gives you the option to add mics to your setup in the future. It seems like the best of both worlds... That or get a cheaper one and some other amp sims.
#15
I use amp software. Tubes are great but expensive. I don't have money to buy 1000 dollar amps, but a 200-300 dollar program gives me over 50 amps and effects, allowing me to get tones I never thought I could get.
#16
Line 6 HD300 is better option for recording for you.
The tone is great.
Definitely nothing can beat the real old skool mic ing the guitar amp. But you need skill to mic it properly, set it up properly, you need good amp, you need acoustically treated room.
So unless you have professional sound engineer, great tube amp and mic and great room for recording, definitely go for the Line 6 HD series.