#1
Hey,

Recently my band asked me to write a solo for a compo of ours. The progression of the solo section is :
i - i - i - VII/VI.
The problem is, whatever I play, the first three bars desperately sound boring and dull.

Now I'm lacking ideas, and my knowledge in musical theory is obviously quite weak, so, could anyone give me some advices about writing such solos ?

Thanks in advance.


PS : I'm not asking you to write a solo in my place !
Last edited by intOxPTH at Oct 30, 2011,
#2
Maybe change up the rhythm section, it sounds like the fact that it's so dull is bringing the solo down, but, i haven't heard it, so maybe you're doing something totally awesome with it that i can't hear from this... You could also just loop the progression and improvise until you find something cool.
#3
Just make sure each time that chord is played you play that note too. Then just use filler notes in between
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#4
Check out a jazz song called Impressions. It's a 15 minute song that only uses two chords. I often say that theory isn't necessary, but this is one instance where a little could go a long way. Have you considered using something modal over that long three-bar section? It might be just the ticket.
#6
I have played and written similar songs. The key is to shake up the rhythm, like a few other people said, and really experiment with the notes. A good idea might be to sit at a piano and have the chords play over and over again and try to figure out what notes sound good, basically trial and error. Then, when you grab your guitar, you will have a better understanding of what notes sound good and which ones dont. I do this all the time, especially when playing jazz. I sit down with the chords and work out a solo on the piano. Then, once I feel like I get it, I pick up my trombone and go to work!
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#7
Quote by intOxPTH
Hey,

Recently my band asked me to write a solo for a compo of ours. The progression of the solo section is :
i - i - i - VII/VI.
The problem is, whatever I play, the first three bars desperately sound boring and dull.

Now I'm lacking ideas, and my knowledge in musical theory is obviously quite weak, so, could anyone give me some advices about writing such solos ?

Thanks in advance.


PS : I'm not asking you to write a solo in my place !


good advice from people so far, but what style are you playing in?
#8
You have to think of a musical idea that sounds interesting given the rhythmic and other melodic content of the song.

This would be a great time to write the solo away from your instrument - at least the main melodic ideas. Without chord changes to give you something to play against, it's even more important.

Remember that really a good solo has two parts: the melody and the embellishment. A lot of less experienced guitar players focus on the second part of that, but it's really the less important of the two parts.

But trying to compose on you guitar may make you tend to focus on licks and trills, rather than the melodic content of the solo. So start by coming up with a solo that sounds interesting SUNG. Then, once you've worked that out, translate it to the fretboard and start adding embellishments.
#9
I think that a good solo can still sound like shit if it has a dull chord progression underneath. Try changing the chord progression.

Try adding chords iv and v.
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#10
I'm going to guess that there's only one note in those first bars because the bassist is just hanging on the root. So he's always able to add more if his skills are up to scratch.

Otherwise, it's all up to you. Most of the ridiculously long "stop the show it's show off time" solos are played to one chord, or with no backing at all, but the guitarist chooses to stay with one scale anyway.

Personally I'd write a melody outside of band practice for you to play over that section at least (if not all). Play around with it and see how goes. The only "boring" part is coming from your perspective, so figure out why it's "boring" and try to make your part "interesting".
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#11
Quote by BeastModeEngage
Just make sure each time that chord is played you play that note too. Then just use filler notes in between


Why does he have to do that?

Is there a rhythm guitar playing the i chord, or is indeed just a bassist?

What kind of "feel" do you want to create? What kind of song is it? Is it a shred-tacular extravaganza, or is a moody, sultry kind of song? That's the first thing you want to tackle. You aren't locked into a particular scale - the rythm guitarist is only giving you three notes - the rest is up to you. So first you need to know what you want to listener to feel.
#12
This...
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
good advice from people so far, but what style are you playing in?

and this...
Sounding boring and dull is subjective. Can't give advice unless you can describe what you are already doing.

As a general rule; work on your phrasing, use non-chord tones to create tension, resolve that tension with chord tones.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 31, 2011,