#1
Is there any tips anyone can give me for writing heavy riffs with a Breaking Benjamin type style, or similar styles (RED, Trapt, etc)
#2
they're not heavy!
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    #3
    drop d/c, boring power chords, hook-verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus-chorus formula
    modes are a social construct
    #8
    Another distortion pedal for teh br00tz!!!
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    #9
    3 powerchord x50 2 x50 oh, then put it in drop A flat
    5 _____________4
    just kidding. learn their style then expand from that with your own flair and creativity. do not copy them though.
    #10
    Sing them out and figure it out on guitar.

    This is why I walk around going "Duu-duduu-duuu,etc.." and bopping my head like a lunatic
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    #11
    Utilize palm muting. If tuning to Drop B is still too bright for you, try tuning G#/Ab standard or Drop F#, you'll need heavier gauge strings. Palm muting will make a world of difference. If you're still not getting what you want out of a six, it might be time to move to an ERG.
    #12
    lol those bands aren't heavy at all
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    #13
    im getting a baritone for christmas (which is what those bands use, except trapt on some songs) and when I say heavy i mean some of the riffs, i know theres heavier bands i listen to all kinds of music
    #14
    People: do not judge people's taste in music, that's not what we're here for. The fact that there are heavier bands has no place in this thread.

    TS: I second jkielq91's advice but also add: learn some theory so you can analyse the songs you like and find out what makes them sound the way they do and what parts of that you enjoy. That's really what theory is for: saying to yourself "I need this sound" and knowing how to get it.
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    #15
    Quote by jkielq91
    Learn riffs by the band you love AND the bands who inspired the bands you love.



    This is the best way.

    Also you should consider:

    if yu know how to pal mute:

    If you don't here is how: http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/palm-mute-guitar-fret-hand-muting/


    And you should also learn the modes.

    This kind of riffs (i am a fan of drop B tuning) are usually in the minor scale.

    http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/music-theory/guitar-modes-the-guitar-modes-of-the-major-scale/

    Learn all the shapes in 5 strings. I rarely use the thick string in soloing, and besides that in drop tuning it get a little different to use it when you play scales and stuff.
    #16
    Just to point out that while a lot of heavy bands do use really low tuning, you don't NEED really low tuning to sound heavy. There are plenty of heavy riffs in standard tuning - plus if it sounds heavy in standard, it'll sure as hell sound heavy in drop B. Doesn't always work the other way around.
    #17
    Quote by llBlackenedll
    Just to point out that while a lot of heavy bands do use really low tuning, you don't NEED really low tuning to sound heavy. There are plenty of heavy riffs in standard tuning - plus if it sounds heavy in standard, it'll sure as hell sound heavy in drop B. Doesn't always work the other way around.

    Yeah, Slayer manage to sound heavier than most metalcore and they play in Eb, and Lamb Of God don't go lower than Drop D. You don't need to go low to be heavy.
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    #18
    Quote by DoubleBassCrash
    Utilize palm muting. If tuning to Drop B is still too bright for you, try tuning G#/Ab standard or Drop F#, you'll need heavier gauge strings. Palm muting will make a world of difference. If you're still not getting what you want out of a six, it might be time to move to an ERG.

    "Tune lower = br00tul d00d".
    #19
    If you want to write heavier sounding riffs, look at what kind of note and time intervals make the riffs you want to emulate sound that way. Most of the bands you named get their sound from low tunings (Drop C and lower) and using large amounts of distortion. Further, they seem to tend to build on simple minor motifs that focus on the signature minor intervals - the third, the sixth, and the seventh - as well as half step intervals to achieve that sound. They also tend to use powerchords, open chords, and basic barre chords to achieve a full sound. Most of the melodies on the guitar focus on those same minor intervals and are doubled in octaves to achieve a full sound over the rhythm section's chords and root notes.

    All of that is just from cursory listening. If you learn how to listen to music from a productional and theoretical standpoint, you can do a basic analysis like that just from listening to the song. If you practice listening with the intent to analyze, you can easily figure out what makes certain passages sound the way they do and how to emulate them.
    #20
    Quote by apajr

    And you should also learn the modes.

    This kind of riffs (i am a fan of drop B tuning) are usually in the minor scale.

    http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/music-theory/guitar-modes-the-guitar-modes-of-the-major-scale/

    Learn all the shapes in 5 strings. I rarely use the thick string in soloing, and besides that in drop tuning it get a little different to use it when you play scales and stuff.

    That's the good thing about drop tuning IMO, if you're in say, Drop D, both D strings will use the same frets for the scale. But modes really aren't necessary, just use the minor scale and don't be afraid to hit notes outside of the scale.
    Quote by DoubleBassCrash
    Utilize palm muting. If tuning to Drop B is still too bright for you, try tuning G#/Ab standard or Drop F#, you'll need heavier gauge strings. Palm muting will make a world of difference. If you're still not getting what you want out of a six, it might be time to move to an ERG.

    Dude he wants to be like Breaking Benjamen not Meshuggah, lol. If Drop B isn't heavy enough for him then he just needs to practice using it more.
    Last edited by 37 Narwhals at Oct 31, 2011,