#1
Hey guys! I am getting really lost into the writers block. It have been this way since the summer vacation which is 2,5 months. For 2,5 months I sat down and tried to write riffs I could use in a song, but I am thinking too much about the characteristics of a genre that everything I write becomes generic. Even when I try mixing things I can only think of things that have been done before!

I play metal... or to be more specific I want to play thrash metal without playing thrash metal. I mean that thrash metal in general is generic nowadays so I want to do something new within it... problem is I don't have a clue what to do... If I try changing a chord progression or harmonize or something it switches to another already-invented-subgenre.

It's easy to play in another band's "style", I mean take a look at In Flames for example (they aren't thrash but they were just on top of my mind), all In Flames do is using harmonies in a good way. It's easy for me to do that too, but everything I do is too In Flames-ish and I feel like a copycat even if it have a different structure

Anyone have some tips to get over this copycat-writers-block-feel? Thanks!
#3
You can't do something new within a clearly defined genre. You can draw influences from it, but as soon as you leave the confines of thrash, well, it won't be thrash anymore.

Just write music, don't worry about genres.
#4
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
You can't do something new within a clearly defined genre. You can draw influences from it, but as soon as you leave the confines of thrash, well, it won't be thrash anymore.

Just write music, don't worry about genres.

This. Don't worry if it doesn't sound like thrash, worry if it doesn't sound good.
#5
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
You can't do something new within a clearly defined genre. You can draw influences from it, but as soon as you leave the confines of thrash, well, it won't be thrash anymore.

Just write music, don't worry about genres.


Quote by 37 Narwhals
This. Don't worry if it doesn't sound like thrash, worry if it doesn't sound good.


Well ... some riffs I make does, in my opinion, sound good but also generic :/
#6
I'm sorry TS, but I feel like I've seen this same post from you like 3 times now, and it doesn't ever seem to get resolved because you're obsessed with sounding original and writing original thrash metal. There are only 12 notes to play and only so much context. If you want to sound different, you have to write differently, draw different influences and innovate. There is no easy answer that will get you writing suddenly new or different thrash metal riffs.

The vast majority of all rock and roll has been rehashing the same blues concepts for half a century, there's only so much you can do inside any given genre that like others in the thread have said, is clearly defined. Yet, the Black Keys are suddenly popular, though its not like they've done anything so incredibly new to blues rock.

If your riffs don't satisfy you, go back and rewrite them. Don't look at where your fingers are going, try to imagine the sound inside of your head, away from your guitar. Try different songwriting techniques.
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#7
And to add to this, search bar. This has already been discussed, for the same genre...

Maybe it was you, s someone suggested...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#9
Start in a different place. Instead of starting your song with a guitar riff, try starting with a vocal part, or a bass line.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
One thing you could do is take some of the generic sounding riffs that you think are good, and build off of them. You could change the key, or try adding a lead that could change the sound.

For example, if the riff is a pretty heavy, classic thrash sort of thing, you could try adding a delayed lead, or maybe an ambient clean sort of thing over it.