#1
I am practicing chromatic patterns with a metronome on my guitar, and i noticed my pinky especially comes way off the guitar. i Get tired quickly when i do these excersizes, first my thumb then my pinky, ring finger, etc. I've been playing guitar for a few years, and would often practice shredding for a month but then stop. I dont want to, but should i start learning guitar over again beacause my fingers? I imagine i would have to go very slowly from the beginning, but I don't know if its worth it. they never gaveme a problem before but i am trying to increase speed....
#2
Don't focus on speed, it comes in time, focus on something different like accuracy, and random techniques.
#7
Firstly, Congratulations on using a metronome and practicing.

Your fingers will naturally move more economically in time. Try different variations.
EG:
3 notes per string runs.
2 note per string (Pentatonic) (This is important too, lots of players can shred chromatics but play a mediocre pentatonic run).


You're picking hand is important. Practice alternate picking over two strings.
Or, if you're like me, Economy picking. There's no point having fast fingers if your picking hand can't keep up and isn't in sync.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#8
Quote by Knucklehead Dyl
can you imagine how desolate this place would be if people did a little research before they made a thread about their problems?


+10000
#9
Quote by Knucklehead Dyl
can you imagine how desolate this place would be if people did a little research before they made a thread about their problems?



We wouldn't even have this section of the forum.
Quote by Diamond Dave

Things that restored my faith in humanity this year: 26
Things that removed all faith in humanity this year: 1,563,745,234 (estimated)

so that's a result of -1,563,745,208 faith points in humanity lost, which is actually up from last year!
#10
Quote by mdc


For once I actually disagree with Justin: I would say that trying to keep your fingers close to the fretboard is very likely to introduce tension. In my opinion the key thing you should be aiming for when you're doing that kind of exercise is relaxing.

The most important part is really to make sure that when you're done fretting a note you don't lift your finger, you don't try and keep it at a certain height over the fretboard or anything like that. When you're done fretting just relax your finger; don't lift, lifting is counter-productive, just relax. Of course when you're practicing you need to work on this really slowly but whatever you do, don't try and make yourself do anything, not fretting a note because you're fretting another one is exactly that: not fretting.

Just remember: the opposite of fretting is not lifting, it's just not fretting.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
For once I actually disagree with Justin: I would say that trying to keep your fingers close to the fretboard is very likely to introduce tension. In my opinion the key thing you should be aiming for when you're doing that kind of exercise is relaxing.

The most important part is really to make sure that when you're done fretting a note you don't lift your finger, you don't try and keep it at a certain height over the fretboard or anything like that. When you're done fretting just relax your finger; don't lift, lifting is counter-productive, just relax. Of course when you're practicing you need to work on this really slowly but whatever you do, don't try and make yourself do anything, not fretting a note because you're fretting another one is exactly that: not fretting.

Just remember: the opposite of fretting is not lifting, it's just not fretting.



I agree with this. During many complex solos you just wouldn't be able to keep fingers close to the fretboard, also, some techniques like sweep picking and tapping quite don't go well with that. The idea is to play anything in a relaxed state without creating tension.
#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
For once I actually disagree with Justin: I would say that trying to keep your fingers close to the fretboard is very likely to introduce tension. In my opinion the key thing you should be aiming for when you're doing that kind of exercise is relaxing.

The most important part is really to make sure that when you're done fretting a note you don't lift your finger, you don't try and keep it at a certain height over the fretboard or anything like that. When you're done fretting just relax your finger; don't lift, lifting is counter-productive, just relax. Of course when you're practicing you need to work on this really slowly but whatever you do, don't try and make yourself do anything, not fretting a note because you're fretting another one is exactly that: not fretting.

Just remember: the opposite of fretting is not lifting, it's just not fretting.


Glad I found someone who understand one of the important key in achieving speed

totally agree
#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
For once I actually disagree with Justin: I would say that trying to keep your fingers close to the fretboard is very likely to introduce tension. In my opinion the key thing you should be aiming for when you're doing that kind of exercise is relaxing.

The most important part is really to make sure that when you're done fretting a note you don't lift your finger, you don't try and keep it at a certain height over the fretboard or anything like that. When you're done fretting just relax your finger; don't lift, lifting is counter-productive, just relax. Of course when you're practicing you need to work on this really slowly but whatever you do, don't try and make yourself do anything, not fretting a note because you're fretting another one is exactly that: not fretting.

Just remember: the opposite of fretting is not lifting, it's just not fretting.


+1

Try it slow, turtle slow, braindead slow, grass growing slow and relaxed until that friggin pinky doesnt shoot up like a whip, keep practicing slow and gradually speed up.
You should get it fixe within a couple of months
#14
Quote by Slashiepie
+1

Try it slow, turtle slow, braindead slow, grass growing slow and relaxed until that friggin pinky doesnt shoot up like a whip, keep practicing slow and gradually speed up.
You should get it fixe within a couple of months


Depending on what you're trying to achieve I might not agree with that either. Bearing in mind that just because you can play X thing, whatever that is, that doesn't mean your technique is necessarily good and it will never be perfect I also would say that if you want to improve your technique you have to keep on playing slowly and not speed up.

In a post in the last couple of weeks I mentioned that this "practice" process was different from the "learning" process wherein you do start slow and speed up gradually and so on just like everyone always says.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.