#1
I'm not really sure if this is the right place so feel free to move this or whatever.
Anyway, what sort of playing techniques would i need to get the Metallica Load era sound, because as much as i love playing thrash i would like to try the slightly bluesy-er hard rock styles of Load, but i don't know where to start, could anyone help me out?
thanks in advance, will.
#2
Inb4 "suck more", "sell out", etc.

Anyway. The first thing they did on those records to get a tonally different sound from their previous ones was turn up the mids. Most of their albums up until Load had a guitar tone that was dominated mostly by bass and treble, and a very punchy bass tone to take up the midrange. With Load and Reload, they put the mids back into their guitar for a more up-front sounding tone. Obviously, the tempo became slower, and with that the drums were mixed in a much crisper style; this was also apparent on the self-titled. The mix of everything was very integral to that sound.

Mixing techniques aside, as far as playing goes Kirk and James both experimented with more bluesy scales; they began favoring blues scale, minor pentatonic and natural minor for their riffs, rather than Phrygian Locrian, or chromatic as they did in records past (compare The Unforgiven II, Until It Sleeps, or King Nothing to Damage Inc, Seek & Destroy, or Fight Fire With Fire). Kirk's solos got slower and more focused on phrasing rather than just fast legato, although this was apparent in the self-titled album also. The main things I can think of are the scale choice and the speed of the riffs, focusing more on individual notes rather than the speed of the phrase as a whole.
#3
Quote by NathanielLost
Inb4 "suck more", "sell out", etc.

Anyway. The first thing they did on those records to get a tonally different sound from their previous ones was turn up the mids. Most of their albums up until Load had a guitar tone that was dominated mostly by bass and treble, and a very punchy bass tone to take up the midrange. With Load and Reload, they put the mids back into their guitar for a more up-front sounding tone. Obviously, the tempo became slower, and with that the drums were mixed in a much crisper style; this was also apparent on the self-titled. The mix of everything was very integral to that sound.

Mixing techniques aside, as far as playing goes Kirk and James both experimented with more bluesy scales; they began favoring blues scale, minor pentatonic and natural minor for their riffs, rather than Phrygian Locrian, or chromatic as they did in records past (compare The Unforgiven II, Until It Sleeps, or King Nothing to Damage Inc, Seek & Destroy, or Fight Fire With Fire). Kirk's solos got slower and more focused on phrasing rather than just fast legato, although this was apparent in the self-titled album also. The main things I can think of are the scale choice and the speed of the riffs, focusing more on individual notes rather than the speed of the phrase as a whole.

im trying out the things you suggested and i get a similar sort of sound but because i have listened to these albums a lot a find my self playing things that sound a bit TOO similar to songs of the albums, but i am getting there slowly
#4
I always want to sound good with the guitar even when it sounds good i always find imperfections but i think having more than one guitar would clear that. I always tune in different ways but i have to tune again to get different sound that i like but it still feels incomplete, that's when i play one song with the guitar tuned in a way and can't seem to play another song the same way but i always believe that one can in further from that standard EADGBE, why is it called standard maybe a confirmation of why will convince many people to stick to it. But i don't think that any of the well known guitar using bands or artistes do stick with the standard tuning.