#1
hey people, hows it going? i thought this was the perfect place to seek answers.

lately i've been looking into lead playing more and more because i'm starting to love funky fusionish bluesy stuff. i don't want to limit myself to playing pink floyd stuff that i learn by watching others, and i've always enjoyed faster playing and so forth. now, fast alternate picking is no problem for me, so i figured i'd have some fun blazing through the pentatonic scale--thing is, i keep playing the same lick over and over, same amount of notes in 1 beat and so forth... so i figured i'd look up some videos online, see if it'd make me any wiser, and i came across this; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVCTJpHyeXE

the guy's always been one of my heroes but i have no idea what exactly he's doing and/or talking about when he's starting to play the somewhat simple scales over the metronome...

i know my chords, shapes and pentatonics, but i have no idea how to incorporate them... so basicly, right now you could classify me as a intermediate rythm player... where do i go from here? how do i gain the ability to be able to play things that for example govan and gilbert do--perhaps not as fast and complex, but atleast understand them and be able to do them.
Last edited by choocharooni at Nov 1, 2011,
#2
understanding sadly, doesnt always comes from being able to play things.
you could learn to play virtually anything without knowing any theory.

When it comes to lead, pentatonics are just the tip of the iceberg.
Learn the Major Scale ->after youre done memorize the cIrcle of Fifths, then you will know the Minor scale -> learn other scales like the Melodic Minor -> Harmonic Minor ->Hungarian etc..

Understand some basic Theory and youre good to go
#3
He's talking about grouping your notes rhythmically. The cliché he talks about is for example running down the natural minor scale in 3's or 4's.

For example start on the root and go backwards 4 adjacent notes: Root, 7th, 6th, 5th
Then start on the 7th and go back by 4: 7th, 6th , 5th, 4th

(Those intervals are just numbered notes of the particular diatonic scales starting on the root)

Keep up the pattern until desired lick is formed.

Try coming up with other patterns - for example you not only can go down, you could go up. Or maybe instead of adjacent notes, go up every other note (up in 3rds).

Guthrie's been asked about instead of grouping them in 4's, try weird ones like 5's and 7's. Two ways being similar to the pattern above, or put it into quintuplets.


All that's sort of irrelevant though, the most important thing he said was about having a 'Sonic Reference'. What you want is to hear the music in your head and use your scales/chords/theory to get those sounds out there and refine.

Find a backing track (youtube's good) and start experimenting
Last edited by Rich T at Nov 1, 2011,
#4
so i would have to learn the major scale and experiment with backing tracks? what's the circle of fifths? any more tips? i liked rich_t's advice.
#5
You mentioned knowing chords and "shapes", but do you know what stuff actually sounds like?
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Quote by choocharooni
nope

i knew that would be your answer - and that's the whole problem.

You're unwittingly approaching this ass-backwards...playing the guitar, in particular composing a solo, isn't a case of thinking "well, I know this shape, let's muck around with it and see what comes out". If you do that what tends to happen is you aimlessly let your fingers wander up and down a scale shape, or they wander through some well drilled shapes and runs on autopilot- and all the time you're wondering why everything sounds the same.

The absolute first thing you need to do, before you fret a note, before you pick a string, before you even pick the guitar up, is ask yourself one question - "what do I want to hear?". You need to have a goal, an idea of the sound you want to hear and will therefore going to have to create. Once you have that idea, then your knowledge of theory and the fretboard will help you make it come to life.

Scales are just tools - and just as a carpenter can't pick up a hammer and have it suggest what to make or how to make it, a guitarist can't just look at a scale shape and magically have a melody appear. That creative spark has to come from inside you, from your experience, knowledge and understanding of music. Listen to the backing, think of what would sound good over it, then worry about what you need to do on the guitar to create it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
Quote by steven seagull
i knew that would be your answer - and that's the whole problem.

You're unwittingly approaching this ass-backwards...playing the guitar, in particular composing a solo, isn't a case of thinking "well, I know this shape, let's muck around with it and see what comes out". If you do that what tends to happen is you aimlessly let your fingers wander up and down a scale shape, or they wander through some well drilled shapes and runs on autopilot- and all the time you're wondering why everything sounds the same.

The absolute first thing you need to do, before you fret a note, before you pick a string, before you even pick the guitar up, is ask yourself one question - "what do I want to hear?". You need to have a goal, an idea of the sound you want to hear and will therefore going to have to create. Once you have that idea, then your knowledge of theory and the fretboard will help you make it come to life.

Scales are just tools - and just as a carpenter can't pick up a hammer and have it suggest what to make or how to make it, a guitarist can't just look at a scale shape and magically have a melody appear. That creative spark has to come from inside you, from your experience, knowledge and understanding of music. Listen to the backing, think of what would sound good over it, then worry about what you need to do on the guitar to create it.


This post should be a sticky in itself ^
It's spelled wiener.