#1
Hi
i am having a really frustrating problem. does this happen to others or is it just me. i
learn a lick and at first i nail it and can play it even without looking at the frets.
But after few days of practice i mess it up and can't seem to get it right
no matter how hard i try...please tell me if its normal or is it a
problem with me alone.

Thanks
#2
http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/ (it is FREE)

Read chapter 1 and 2 and you will understand what is the solution.

The thing is that you probably practice good according to your opinion, but according to "muscle memory" you are probably doing something wrong.

Ask yourself these questions:

1. When learning the lick are first playing it at slow tempos ?

2. When learning the lick are you COMPLETELY relaxed or you try the lick as fast as you can from start ?

In chapter 2 i give you a powerful technique to help you out with learning licks and making them second nature so that you can play them effortlessly any time.

Warning: It takes time to play effortlessly and probably more important, it takes you a good learning approach in order to achieve effortlessly mastery.

Good luck
#3
Make sure you arent using muscle memory (I dislike using it outside of alt picking technique) There are some riffs that I have known and played for a long time and using muscle memory I just tend to **** them up alot more often then not.

-my 2c
#4
Quote by SGen
Make sure you arent using muscle memory (I dislike using it outside of alt picking technique) There are some riffs that I have known and played for a long time and using muscle memory I just tend to **** them up alot more often then not.

-my 2c


If you're screwing them up from muscle memory you never knew them in the first place; doing it that way is the only reasonable way of getting any kind of pace in your playing.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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Album.
Legion.
#5
Okay i get that its the muscle memory but is it common among guitar players or does it happen to only few???????
#6
Quote by bonehead14
Okay i get that its the muscle memory but is it common among guitar players or does it happen to only few???????


It doesn't matter, if you can't play something to a certain tempo on a certain day then you need to slow it down and make sure you're doing it right at a tempo you can manage before trying to get it back up to speed again.

Are you making sure you're warmed up and such before jumping in to difficult things? I find that if I hit "the zone" on one day then I do have to work a bit to get back to that awesome spot again the next day.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
If you're screwing them up from muscle memory you never knew them in the first place; doing it that way is the only reasonable way of getting any kind of pace in your playing.


No I know them and have been able to play them at speed for some time, but I know that there are a few I can screw up at speed if I dont pay enough attention to and simply let pure muscle memory do its thing.

Probably should have phrased that differently but w/e.
#8
Quote by SGen
Make sure you arent using muscle memory (I dislike using it outside of alt picking technique) There are some riffs that I have known and played for a long time and using muscle memory I just tend to **** them up alot more often then not.

-my 2c


Why not use muscle memory?
It's one of the greatest things for a guitar player, since if you learn something well so that it becomes natural for you muscle memory you will be able to play it effortless.
Sorry, i just found that it sounded stupid not to use it.

My 2 cents.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#9
Chances are you learnt them at speed and could play them fine, but then the next day you expected to be able to play it as well as you could at the end of the previous night's session. Doing this over a few days will likely change your muscle memory to be the mistake-riddled version you're now playing.

I used to do it all the time - nail something one day, then the next day try to start off at the same speed. I'd get frustrated and keep trying it at that speed. It doesn't work well at all - if you're making mistakes, slow down, preferably a LOT. You just have to make sure that you start slow every day, after a while it'll come back to you.
#10
Guys, muscle memory is good for your playing!

...but you shouldn't use it to learn entire phrases and licks, as this can lead to very repetitive playing.

Doesn't it make more sense to focus on programming the correct technique into your "muscle memory" (i.e. having the correct hand position, economy of motion and finger independence etc.) and then apply those things to whatever you intend to play?

Anyway, playing something from "muscle memory" with mistakes and bad technique, is still something that's riddled with mistakes and bad technique! If you're using great technique from "muscle memory", then you should be able to play whatever you play in the best, most efficient way, right?
#11
Quote by chainsawguitar
Guys, muscle memory is good for your playing!

...but you shouldn't use it to learn entire phrases and licks, as this can lead to very repetitive playing.

Doesn't it make more sense to focus on programming the correct technique into your "muscle memory" (i.e. having the correct hand position, economy of motion and finger independence etc.) and then apply those things to whatever you intend to play?

Anyway, playing something from "muscle memory" with mistakes and bad technique, is still something that's riddled with mistakes and bad technique! If you're using great technique from "muscle memory", then you should be able to play whatever you play in the best, most efficient way, right?


I don't think you can control muscle memory like that.... just like if you see something you can't unsee it.

Do you mean to say if you learn something you intentionally unlearn it after a time so it doesn't set in as muscle memory? Muscle memory is just a thing that happens..

Having said that I do agree that the main thing you want down as muscle memory is technique, though learning licks etc slowly and thoroughly is as good a way to build technique as any.
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 3, 2011,