#1
I've been looking around for a 4 track recorder. digital or otherwise. I assume digital is easier to find. And I've been trying to find one that has 4 inputs. something similar to the 4 track cassette recorders where you could record 4 things simultaneously then go back and adjust volume and such afterwards. but all the recorders i've found that are 4 track only have 2 inputs. any suggestions for anything I've described?
#2
Budget?

You won't find a 4 track recorder which can do 4 tracks at a time, if that's a requirement you'll need to get at least an 8 track - but the more tracks the better is a general rule.

I've used multitrackers made by Fostex, Tascam and Zoom and would recommend those.

If the multitrackers which have enough inputs for your purposes are out of your budget, it may also be worth considering just getting an interface with 4 inputs that you can hook up to your PC and use that for recording instead.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Nov 4, 2011,
#4
I have briefly used the 24 track version & was impressed, it was my second choice when I recently upgraded my multitracker.

I didn't go for it for 2 reasons:
  • I prefer actually using the multitracker for the whole process, this is designed for use in conjunction with a PC. Although I see it as a good thing that things are progressing and it's proof that multitrackers are keeping up with modern technology, I don't want to have to rely on my PC for recording (it's in a different room to my guitars) so it wouldn't have been very convenient.
  • Although it was a 24 track, it only has 8 faders. This means that when switching from one bank to the next (it had three banks of tracks, 1-8, 9-16 and 17-24) all faders will be out of position so a slight alteration in volume on one track could potentially become a bit of a pain in the arse. The 16 track version you're considering will have the same issue.


Both fairly minor complaints, and they were the only issues I found with Zoom's R series so I'd always recommend them. My thoughts are that they are the first step towards aligning multitracker DAWs with software DAWs and barring those two minor complaints I'd say they're a great step along the way.

Also worth noting that the 16 track version you're looking at doesn't include the drum machine functionality which is included with the 8 or 24 track version. I have no idea why Zoom would think it was a good idea to leave that off this version.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
Last edited by GaryBillington at Nov 4, 2011,
#5
well i want enough inputs to roughly mic up a band and able to play and record everything at once. but have everything on separate tracks to edit, mix, etc. and do you need to connect it to a computer for adding like effects to the tracks? and can you adjust like the volume and pan tracks roughly to a side after recording with the device and no pc? or is the pc required for that?
#6
The R16 does have built in effects, so it can do most of what you'd need without attaching it to the PC - have to admit, I didn't actually play with panning when I tried it, but that is standard functionality on even the most basic multitrackers so I'd be totally amazed if it couldn't do it! Volume is adjusted by the faders so that's easily controlled.

From what you've said, it sounds like you don't necessarily want to hook it up to your PC for mixing, so it could be worth looking at something which is designed as a standalone multitracker?

Zoom's R series is unique (at the moment) in being designed to work in conjunction with a PC. If you want something standalone, you would probably be better off looking at something else.

I said earlier the Zoom was my second choice. I ended up getting my first choice - a Tascam 2488. The current model (the Neo) is £649 in my country, but I bought the previous model (MkII) which has mostly the same functionality for £275 used. (I'd always recommend getting something like this used from somewhere like ebay, that way you get higher spec kit for your money).

The Tascam can record up to 8 tracks at a time and has more than enough EQ & effects for most people's needs (if you wanted more than this could do you'd have to use software and spend all your time downloading all sorts of plugins). As this is designed as standalone kit, it takes you right through the process from your initial recording to a fully mixed & mastered track which is burnt to CD.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
Last edited by GaryBillington at Nov 4, 2011,