#1
Picked up a hardware-stripped 2008 Gibson LP Special DC body off eBay a few weeks ago. Can't find this particular model in shops here and buying a bare body and putting on the hardware and electronics myself saved about £250 in total, so not too bad. That's including the custom charge too, if it hadn't been for that I pretty much would have had this for about the price of an Epiphone.

Note on pickups: these guitars will not take non-Gibson pickups. Not only is the routing more rounded and slightly narrower than the standard P-90 shape but there are brass threaded inserts for the mounting screws and regular P-90 mounting screws won't fit. So you need both Gibson's own screws and their covers. If you really didn't like Gibson's P-90s you could buy one and have it re-wound by someone or you could re-route the body and take out the inserts, but that's a pain. Luckily for me my main reason for wanting one of these guitars was the stock tone so I happily bought the Gibson pickups, but other buyers beware: no other brand of pickups will fit.

But I got it to all fit together properly in the end. Full spec run-down is as follows:
  • 1 piece mahogany body (yes, 1-piece on a production guitar. I was expecting 3-piece but this is definitely a 1-piece)
  • 1 piece mahogany neck, set at the 22nd fret (even better fret access than an SG)
  • Rosewood fretboard (looks like Madagascar Rosewood)
  • 60's neck profile, or at least something very close to it
  • 'Worn' TV Yellow finish
  • Gibson P-90s: alnico V, DC resistance measures 8.33k at the bridge, 8.54k at the neck (installed the 'wrong' way around as I prefer my bridge pickups to be a little clearer and my neck pickups to be a bit louder and thicker)
  • 300k linear pots for volume
  • 500k audio taper pots for tone
  • Orange Drop .033uf capacitors
  • Kluson tuners
  • Gotoh tune-o-matic bridge with a Gibson stopbar


It's exactly what I wanted. The slightly hotter neck gives a great solo tone - pinch harmonics scream out of it like you wouldn't believe, **** the people who say you need bridge pickups for harmonics - and the clearer bridge has quickly become my favourite rhythm tone. There's not much hum either. With a noise gate I've had this thing throwing out gothic metal really well (because lol), with low gain this is the best classic rock guitars I've found and sticking a fuzz pedal in front of it gave me instant Prince crazy wailing. Dare I say with my HD147 I don't think I need any of my other guitars any more. P-90s are the shit.


Speaking o f the HD147, I also picked up a new amp to replace it. Or at least, that was my initial idea. Bear with me.


Anyone who remembers me from a while back will know I'm a massive Bon Jovi and Paramore nut, both of whom use JCM2000s. So I thought it was about time I picked up a DSL100. Found one second hand, fairly beat up but still in working order (and most importantly, under half the new price). Had it serviced, put in new valves. Plugged it in. Let it warm up. Played it. Loved it..

A month later and I can't be arsed to turn the ****er on.

Tone-wise it did what I wanted it to. It's got that standard Marshall crunch plus a little extra gain and a mid-cut switch for more modern flexibility. It's got that warm valve tone, it sags and screams as you'd want it to. I can back the gain off and get a quality blues-rock tone or max it out and be in classic metal heaven.

Problem is, I can't be bothered waiting for it to warm up. There's a lot of background noise. The EQ controls don't have as much range as I'd like. I can't go crazy with the gain without it just becoming a wall of noise. I can't get it 100% clean without playing so quietly the unplugged strings drown it out.

Most importantly though... it doesn't sound any different to the various Marshall tones in the HD147. It just doesn't. I even got in a mate's identical Marshall 1936 cab to A/B the two amps and there is no difference in the middle tones. The only difference is the HD147 can also go much heavier and also much cleaner than the Marshall can and it's got a noise gate, compressor, delay, chorus, reverb, flange, phaser, tremolo, Leslie and octave fuzz built in to it and the patch controller has a wah/volume and tuner in it. In comparison the Marshall's noisey, limited in tone, has a mere 1-button channel controller and every other effect has to run through the front of it, making it a lot slower and more messy to operate. The Marshall takes 10 minutes to warm up. The Line 6 is good to go instantly and can even be run without a cab.

I know some smug Plexi nut is going to claim otherwise, but I'm the one that's been in the room with both of them at the same time; modelling is not the devil, solid state is not the devil, there is no difference in sound between good modelling and valve other than the valve amp is far, far more limited.



What I've done three times over the last month is played with the Marshall on-stage but unplugged and the HD147 hiding behind it. Not a single person has noticed that something's amiss, nobody has noticed that I'm actually running though a different amp. Nobody has noticed that I'm actually playing through a solid state modelling amp and not the huge Marshall they can see. To really push the point the last time I did it I didn't even have the Line 6 running to the cab. I had the Marshall go to the cab, turned on and miced up but stuck in standby. The Line 6 went straight to the mixer with the cab modelling on. Yes, amp modelling and cab modelling. And nobody spotted it, nobody could tell the difference.

The funny thing is whenever I've just be running the HD147 in plain sight there has always been at least one person ask me why the hell I'm using a Line 6. Some have flat told me my tone has sucked. Put a dummy Marshall on stage and suddenly nobody has any complaints. Stupid.

I'm not saying that every dumbarse who's bought a Spider III head is justified. I'm not saying that a Marshall MG can sound as good as their valve amps or that nobody should ever buy a valve amp ever again. But in the case of these particular amps, for my purposes as someone who values convenience and doesn't care about being 'vintage correct', high-quality modelling is the way to go.



I know there's stupid rules here now about these threads needing more than text (because reading is so ****ing hard apparently), so have a couple of quick shots.


Close-up of the worn finish. You'll also notice the very round corners of the pickups, which is why non-Gibson P-90s won't fit.




Both together, very classic (and check that fret access)

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#3
tl;dr

But HNGD I like me some double cut gibbshonies
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#5
You can't be bothered to wait the 40 odd seconds it takes for the Marshall to warm up.... Right

Hngd either way.

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#7
Quote by zelyx01
HNGD!

.. and now I'm going out dogging in a Robin Reliant.

Wp


Quote by Tom 1.0
You can't be bothered to wait the 40 odd seconds it takes for the Marshall to warm up.... Right

Hngd either way.
It's not forty seconds, not unless you want to bugger stuff up. takes about six minutes to warm up properly but you want to leave it ten minutes ideally.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble

It's not forty seconds, not unless you want to bugger stuff up. takes about six minutes to warm up properly but you want to leave it ten minutes ideally.

Incorrect.
#10
Quote by MrFlibble



The Marshall takes 10 minutes to warm up. The Line 6 is good to goinstantly and can even be run without a cab


Not true, though tell me, what do you break if you dont warm it upproperly?


What I've done three times over the last month is played with theMarshall on-stage but unplugged and the HD147 hiding behind it. Not a singleperson has noticed that something's amiss, nobody has noticed that I'm actuallyrunning though a different amp.


Probably because your tone sucks or you play at places with truly awfulsound engineers. If you cant tell the difference yourself, either you haveavery poor ear fro tone, or your using so much gain and fizz that the subtlenuances are lost on you anayway.


Yes, amp modelling and cab modelling. And nobody spotted it,nobody could tell the difference


See above.


The funny thing is whenever I've just be running the HD147 in plain sightthere has always been at least one person ask me why the hell I'm using a Line6. Some have flat told me my tone has sucked. Put a dummy Marshall on stage andsuddenly nobody has any complaints. Stupid.


Mainly because your not Robben Ford. Nobody gives a shit if your using aVintage Spec JTM45 or a Dumble. More so if your not famous. Most people dont know much about gear andthose with a small amount of knowlegde will only know that Marshall is generallypercieved as "good" and line6 as "bad".


high-quality modelling is the way to go.


This is a point I would be tempted to agree with you on, if you were usingan Axe or something, but your amp is just POD Farm and a SS power amp. Hardly cutting edge.




I am not trying to to be a dick but your post is just a bit, well weird. A DSL100 is not the best Marshall out there anyway and the HD147 although good, is not the best modeler either, so unless your point is, "two mediorce amps sound similar" I dont get it.

1977 Burny FLG70
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#11
Quote by Tom 1.0
I am not trying to to be a dick but your post is just a bit, well weird. A DSL100 is not the best Marshall out there anyway and the HD147 although good, is not the best modeler either, so unless your point is, "two mediorce amps sound similar" I dont get it.


That's basically it. Not much more to get.


Hey, if he likes the tone, great. Awesome.

Have you tried running the HD147 into the poweramp of the Marshall?
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#12
Quote by MrFlibble
Wp


It's not forty seconds, not unless you want to bugger stuff up. takes about six minutes to warm up properly but you want to leave it ten minutes ideally.

I leave mine on for about two to three minutes while I tune up, warm my fingers up and sort the strap out and get a plectrum.
#13
Quote by MrFlibble

It's not forty seconds, not unless you want to bugger stuff up. takes about six minutes to warm up properly but you want to leave it ten minutes ideally.


lol wut
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#14
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#15
Quote by MrFlibble


this is why i'm certain you just like to type, and are basically trolling with this entire thread.

why the hell would you write this much, then write this line, then go on so long afterwards?

if you are sure nobody is reading, what is the point?

good luck man.

*reported*

for obvious trolling.