#1
Hello U-G Forum, I would like to know what my guitar level is and what songs I should try so I can maybe even begin to play songs from the bands I'm going to list at the end. I want to play hard core rock, metal, death metal, ect... but right now I can only play decent rock.

Songs I can completely play:
A new momentum - Chevelle
Closure - Chevelle
Comfortable liar - Chevelle
Jars - Chevelle
Send the pain below - Chevelle
The Red - Chevelle
When I come around - Green Day

There are like 2 more songs but I don't play them often so I'm not sure of the names.

Bands I would like to play like are:
We butter the bread with butter
A day to remember
Parkway Drive
Dr. Acula
ect..

Thanks for any help / info.

-Donald8274
#3
Just practice like hell.

Pick a song you want to learn to play and dont move on to anything else until youve nailed it. what most folk do is practice a song til they get stuck then just move onto something else so they never get past the bit they were stuck on.

Just keep at it. Hard work will pay dividends
Last edited by LivinJoke84 at Nov 4, 2011,
#4
This is just my opinion and i have no statistics to back it up.
I however think it is a bad move to keep at a song you are still not able to play, because of lacking technique..

You will learn it yeah! but it will take you forever and will be very frustrating and you will take shortcuts and pick up bad habits along the way.

eg if someone wants to play Building The Church by Vai but cant mute, cant finger tap, cant bend, cant play fast or alternate what do you think will be the result?

He will learn it if he keeps at it! definetly! some day some time, but the technique will be lacking. Everyone has their own approach, do what works best for you.

I however always suggest:
This is hard but try to find out what your limitations are and work on them SEPARATELY.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Nov 4, 2011,
#5
Quote by Slashiepie
This is just my opinion and i have no statistics to back it up.
I however think it is a bad move to keep at a song you are still not able to play, because of lacking technique..

You will learn it yeah! but it will take you forever and will be very frustrating and you will take shortcuts and pick up bad habits along the way.

eg if someone wants to play Building The Church by Vai but cant mute, cant finger tap, cant bend, cant play fast or alternate what do you think will be the result?

He will learn it if he keeps at it! definetly! some day some time, but the technique will be lacking. Everyone has their own approach, do what works best for you.

I however always suggest:
This is hard but try to find out what your limitations are and work on them SEPARATELY.


+1. I always used to find if I spent ages trying to learn something way beyond my level, I would often not get that far, and get frustrated. However, after learning other pieces, I'd come back to that one I found so hard and find it easy. It's always best to learn things at or just above your level, though whatever you learn, always make sure you practice it at a speed you can actually play it at rather than forcing your way through. So right now one of the songs I'm learning is "Country Boy" by Albert Lee. Not the kind of thing I usually play, and my hybrid picking isn't great but it's good to play stuff you don't usually. Anyway, I know I can't get it above 120bpm yet, and can only just play it at that speed, to I tend to play it around 70-100bpm to ensure I practice it correctly.
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 4, 2011,
#6
DONT learn one style, sure you want to play death metal or whatever, which is all well and good when you have a solid skillset and technique, which can only be fully developed using different styles and techniques, by all means practice some songs you like and want to play, but don't focus just on them.
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#7
Please dont make the same mistake I did I got out of my music lessons after 2 months (family crisis) and figured I could self teach after that. Nothing wrong with that, except I started learning everything I could by Slipknot, Disturbed, and Avenged Gayfold. Now I'm stuck playing Parkway Drive, Trivium, Gojira, and the aforementioned Avenged Gayfold. I'm having a REALLY tough time breaking out of that, I'm actually learning ska right now.

The trick is to start trying to learn the song you want to learn. Once you hit a wall, find out what's holding you back. Is your picking not fast enough? Are you unable to bar properly? Do parts of your wrist or fingers hurt excessively which is holding you back? What are you unable to do that you need to do in order to play this song dead-on?

Once you've isolated what your problem is, think of a good example of a song that uses that technique or aspect of playing to its' FULLEST. Example, I wanted to learn speed picking so I learned A7Dix - The Beast And The Harlot. lots of easy tremolo picking there, now I'm very good with palm mutes and tremolo picking. The problem is I focused entirely on that so I suck everywhere else. Then move on to trying to learn the song again. Each time you find an obstacle, find a song that forces you to learn what you don't already know, then go back and try again.

If you're ever lost as to what songs you should be learning, come here on UG and ask for advice. For what you want buddy, I'd say if you can play rock, you've probably got some decent knowledge of Chords, even if it's just power chords, that's mostly all metal uses anyway. I know half of everything Parkway has ever written, very rarely do they use too many of those. What you need now is the power of RIFFAGE my friend. Learn stuff with lots of riffs. I really, REALLY hate to use these guys as an example, but Avenged Dickinmyass uses a lot of riff work that's actually pretty beneficial to learn.

It won't get you center stage, but it will prove a useful stepping stone to getting you where you want to be. Try to pick up A7Cox - Strength Of The World, and Bat Country is easy enough to get you started into licks and riffs. When you feel confident, look up the tabs for Parkway Drive - Carrion. Very simple, easy to catch the hang of. I use Carrion as one of my warmups actually. Just for the love of god, do yourself a huge favor.

Pace yourself man. I sped through riffage and metal as fast as I could ignoring everything else. Ask me what a scale is, I'll tell you my weight's none of your business. Learn the fundamentals in between songs. Scales, chords, one at a time. Set a goal to master a new scale every time you learn a new song. Don't quit on a song halfway, finish the whole thing, then move on to a scale or set of chords. You'll be so much of a better guitar player in the end for it. Improvising is key, I can't improvise for shit. I'm a total robot. I can reproduce other people's music easily, provided it's all rhythm lol. But I can't write my own because I have yet to, as moose1512 put it, develop my own skillset. I have metal and I have nothing else, and because of that I don't understand metal as well as I should. Playing for 6 years and I still only know the major pentatonic scale? sad. I'm a very limited player for it and breaking old habits is easily a THOUSAND times harder than forging new habits. Your brain can learn new stuff but your fingers will always remember what you learned to begin with.

New song, Scale, Chords, repeat. When you feel confident in your scales, put a good long tune with instrumentals you really dig on. Improvise, use their music as a backing track and come up with your own stuff to add to it and make it better. Ideas will start popping up in your head and you'll have your own unique sound in no time flat. Key words are patience and motivation. drive.

edit:: 5 haha faces? damn, I must really love making fun of myself. whoops, six.

edit to prevent a crapshoot of my posts everywhere:: I hate avenged with a furious, fiery passion. I could rant all day about it but that's not the point of this thread, that's a convo for the pit. I'll simply leave it with unless you can learn to play their leads which are not by any means easy, then you're stuck with their rhythm which WILL develop horrible habits if not countered with scales and proper musical theory. Only thing I ever gained from them was consistent tremolo picking and average riffing accuracy.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
Last edited by Ishiga at Nov 6, 2011,
#8
Ishiga: That's alot of bashing at Avenged. Not that i like them that much byt still.

TS: As said learn songs you want to play, as long as you practice well and relaxed you can learn everything. Just keep in mind that the harder songs you pick the more time it will take to learn them. Therefor i advice you not to pick the most difficult songs at the start, but there is nothing wrong with a little challange.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#9
I agree with moose1512. Im working on hybrid picking because ive been playing alot of mastodon, but i used to play alot of all that remains, which has alot of triplets...since ive been playing less all that remains i can no longer play triplets as fast. so to fix it ive learned some new songs by atr and played more of old stuff. try msking a small exercise using several techniques and speeds together to practice and try to keep your several skillsets fresh etc...btw brent hinds started with banjo. point being he learned valuable skills not by practicing a single thing but by broadening his skill set and still lots of practice...
Last edited by SDiscipleQ9 at Nov 25, 2011,