#1
Hello

Anyone got a list of songs that will actually sound good on guitar?

I'm also going to learn piano so if you could just tell me where to start and then suggest songs when I actually progress on it.

I know some basic music theory and I would like to apply it on piano and guitar with some songs.

Any suggestions?
#2
Someone like you - Adele
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#4
If you want to orchestrate a piano piece you have to be aware of what's idiomatic to the instruments (techniques/how the instrument is played) and facilitate that in your orchestration.

For example take the piano:

-Able to play a melody and provide it's own accompaniment

-Can sustain passages of music with the sustain pedal

-Large tessitura (range)

-Good dynamic control throughout range

-fast arpeggio/scalar passages can be produced with (relative) ease


Compare this to guitar:

-Can provide melody and accompaniment, although can only produce 6 notes at a time, so if your piano piece has a part in more than 6 voices, you're going to have to make a conscious decision to omit unimportant notes.

-Can sustain single notes and chords, but not to the extent that a piano can. Scales played on piano with the sustain pedal down are going to be hard to replicate on guitar.

-Guitar has good dynamic control, no problems here.

- Compared to the piano, the guitar has a fairly small range, again you're going to have to do some thinking and decide how to get the same effect, maybe with some octave transposition or coming up with something new which has the same effect.

-The guitar is a transposing instrument. When it reads a middle C, the sound that comes out of the guitar is one octave below middle C. Take this into consideration when writing it out.

I'll pick a random piano piece


I have stuff to do, so maybe look at this piece and figure out any problems you might encounter when transferring it to guitar and I'll come back later and give you some pointers.
#7
Thanks for all the suggestions....looks like I have massive work to do hahaha
#9
I think La Valse D'Amelie by Yann Tiersen is a pretty nice piece. I only learned the introduction, but I can see how the arpeggios in the bass towards the middle of the song would pose a problem.
#10
Pretty much ANY piano song can be made to work on the guitar, as there's few songs that can't be stripped down to a bare-bones chord progression. By song I mean a piece of music that has vocals, obviously some tour-de-force instrumentals will have been written to showcase technique on the musicians instrument of choice.

The trick is in being able to pick those chords out, but as long as there's some solid harmony and melody there it can be rearranged for guitar.
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
Pretty much ANY piano song can be made to work on the guitar, as there's few songs that can't be stripped down to a bare-bones chord progression. By song I mean a piece of music that has vocals, obviously some tour-de-force instrumentals will have been written to showcase technique on the musicians instrument of choice.

The trick is in being able to pick those chords out, but as long as there's some solid harmony and melody there it can be rearranged for guitar.


This is good advice as is Griff's advice.

I'd like to add, that if you transpose, do a quick mockup of the lowest voice and the highest voice. (it's bolded because this is very important)

It's a bummer if you spent a lot of time on an arrangement, only to see that you can't get to the lowest note or the highest note in the middle of the song. I used to mess up on this, and it's really demotivating.

Of course you can transcribe octave up or down, but melodies (or parts of them) often rely on contour.

(contour is the direction of the melody in terms of going to a higher note or lower note irregardless of a particular interval)

ie. if you climb up to a high note, playing that last note an octave down due to playability can mess up the tension of the melody and make it seem more of the middle part of the voicing rather then the melody. This is due to the way our ear perceives higher notes as more "prominent" if you will.

So first do a bare mockup of the bass (lowest voice) and the melody, cause the fleshing out (filling in the chords, harmonies etc) is the most flexible in terms of playability and aural perception, and also the place where most of you're individual style comes in (both this, and rhythmic/groove being the other).

If you really want to do a particular song and it's not very playable, mess around with tunings, but know you're fretboard very well, cause if you rely a lot on shapes to navigate around on you're guitar, this can be very hard.

Even better is to train you're ear, cause constant looking up or re-learning a new fretboard layout is time better spent on creativity.

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#13
A lot of people on here might not be into this sort of thing, but I personally like taking church hymns and playing them on guitar. Most hymns are just 4-part harmony, and the piano just plays that instead of an accompaniment. Since it's only 4 parts, it's a LOT easier to transpose for guitar: no long scale runs, not so many range problems, etc. It's a lot of fun for me, and it definitely challenges my guitar playing/music reading abilities.

Piano pieces in pop music and rock are probably your best bet otherwise, they're fairly minimalistic these days, and really easy to play. My personal favorite piano to guitar tune is Billy Joel's "And So It Goes". Tommy Emmanuel did a fantastic arrangement of the song for guitar, and it's really easy to play. Classical music would be MUCH harder to play for the reasons that Griff mentioned, but it's still possible. I would recommend starting with something much less complex.
#14
partita 3 in e major by bach
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#15
Elliott Smith's Baby Britain sounds pretty cool when played on an acoustic.