#1
I've been singing for about a year and I'm mainly influenced by singers Brad Nowell of Sublime, Glen Phillips of Toad the Wet Sprocket, and David Byrne of the Talking Heads. I'm a tenor. I've studied the Bel Canto and understand the logic behind it.

I don't have trouble with volume; people can here me at the opposite ends of my good sized house without hurting my voice. My issue is with tone: the highs are a little bit thin and have a slight nasal quality to them and the rest of my range isn't exactly superb. I use bits and pieces from the Bel Canto; as far as I can tell, I properly use the lift of throat and I understand the logic of the inhalation of voice. But I have trouble with the mask of face. My first question is how can I improve my tone and how to use the mask of face?

My other question is with the diaphragm: I understand how to breath with the diaphragm, but how do I apply it to singing? What should I feel when I sing with it and how should I control it? Long-story-short: I've read alot on the subject and got a lot of answers, but what is the best way to use the diaphragm?
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#2
Well, when a singer's voice starts to get thin and nasal, he or she is most likely out of upper range. Some people are baritones and some are tenors. All the wishing and practicing in the world won't change that.

Nasal decongestants might temporarily clean up a note or two, but no more. I DON'T MEAN NASAL SPRAY TYPES. They'll cause major problems in very short order.....

Using your diaphragm to push air into the "mask", will better produce notes you're capable of hitting, but you're still stuck with the same natural resonant volume, frequency, and of course, vocal chords

If you want to learn about involving the diaphragm in singing, especially pursuant to pitch shifting, I can think of no better suggestion than to grab a copy of Jethro Tull's "Aqualung", and sing along with it. Ian Anderson is a master of acrobatics with his diaphragm.

So was my ex wife, but that's a different matter entirely.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 7, 2011,
#3
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, when a singer's voice starts to get thin and nasal, he or she is most likely out of upper range.


Yes, or is most likely "pushing the voice" for thin-ness, and aiming it wrong within the mask for nasal.

Quote by Captaincranky

Some people are baritones and some are tenors. All the wishing and practicing in the world won't change that.


Mostly true, but with training and practice, you might find that you *thought* you were a baritone, but were really a tenor.... or vice-versa.

Quote by Captaincranky

Using your diaphragm to push air into the "mask", will better produce notes you're capable of hitting,


NOOOOooooo!!! Do not PUSH the voice *anywhere.* That's where it goes thin, takes on a shouting timbre, and starts damaging your vocal cords.

Quote by Captaincranky

but you're still stuck with the same natural resonant volume, frequency, and of course, vocal chords


You are still stuck with the same vocal cords, but resonance is a function of technique more than it is physiology.

Quote by Captaincranky

If you want to learn about involving the diaphragm in singing, especially pursuant to pitch shifting, I can think of no better suggestion than to grab a copy of Jethro Tull's "Aqualung", and sing along with it. Ian Anderson is a master of acrobatics with his diaphragm.


You can't learn technique by listening. You learn technique through a combination of guided instruction and practice.

Quote by Captaincranky

So was my ex wife, but that's a different matter entirely.




@Robbin' The Hood - I'm assuming you've been to my site, then? www.thebelcantotechnique.com ? Have you checked out the videos? My instructor, Edward, explains the mask quite clearly and provides an excellent supplement to what I have written.

As a basic generalization (and really, an over-generalization) you're basically looking at this:

Bottom lip - your lowest note(s) - roughly a major second or so (For me, G, G#)
between the teeth - the next minor third or so (for me, A, A# B)
behind the teeth - the next major third or so (for me, C, C#, D, D# )
top of the teeth - the next few notes (for me, E, F, F#)
the "ridge" - the next few notes (for me, G, G#, A)
the middle of the triangle - the next few notes (for me, A#, B, C, C#, D)
the upper third of the triangle - next few notes (for me, D# E, F)
across the cheekbones - the next few notes (for me F# G, G#)
top of the dome, but still forward - absolute highest notes (for me, maybe G#, A, A#)

It's all basically by degrees. Each part of the triangle is a little bit wider (or narrower, depending on direction) than the next. The important part is that the sound is focused forward on the hard palate, otherwise, everything goes to hell.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.