#1
I've always been interest in how guitarist's like Hnedrix and Frusciante improvise solos or just little bits in songs and wanted to start being able to do that, too.

I have a basic understanding of scales and playing in key, have no idea on how to start learning arpeggios and have idea on where else to go or what else I'll need to learn, anyone help?
#2
There are two things to start doing: play over some backing tracks in order to get the feel for improvising, and study guitarists you admire in order to see how they approach things. Using backing tracks to play will give you a feel for playing over a rhythm part, which in turn should help your phrasing and the general rhythmic drive of your ideas; no one's gonna care if you're playing 10,000 nps if the phrasing sucks. In addition, when you study the guys you admire, you'll be interested in what you're doing and you'll also be able to employ some of their licks in your own playing as well as getting a general feel for their playing style.

Since you say you like Frusciante and Hendrix, I'd spend a lot of time looking at their rhythm parts. I'd consider both of them better rhythm guitarists than lead players, and a lot of it is due in part to the fact that they're influenced considerably by funk players. That's not to say they don't have some good solos here and there, but if you study the way they incorporate little fills and licks into their rhythm playing, you'll be closer to the sound you want to get.
#4
Play one note that sounds good. Play another note that sounds good.

I know it sounds condescending, but thats really all there is too it. Start learning arpeggios and scales and things. They unlock a lot of commonly used sounds to you and a means of organizing senorities, rather than having to think one note at a time
#5
As far as learning arpeggios, just learn chords. Introduce yourself to some chord theory, learn what intervals construct them. Intervals are the tiny building blocks of music theory.

As far as improvisation, just practice over and over until you're sick of it. Trial by fire, playing over rhythm tracks, until it becomes second nature. Think of a quick lick for the upcoming bar; then when you're playing that, whip up another in your head for the next bar.

Ultimately, it's all practice practice practice.
#6
I would say that learning to improvise - which is one of the most challenging things to do as a musician, probably THE most challenging, involves the following:

1) Learning your scales and practicing them over chord changes.
2) Developing your ear so you can think in musical ideas
3) Studying solos you like, learning how to play them, understanding what those guitarists are actually doing
4) Practice, practice, practice.

The book "Guitar Soloing" by Gilbert is supposed to be a pretty good starting place, although it may be covering some material you already know.
#8
http://www.youtube.com/user/youcanlearnguitar
(beginner-intermediate) lesson on licks some scale lessons i think


http://www.youtube.com/user/gr8bluesgtr

(this guy has quite a few lessons on how to help ur soloing /phrasing) if ur into blues u might want to consider this guitar instructor


http://www.youtube.com/user/JustinSandercoe
(if u wan learn about arpegios justin has a free online site that talks about arpegios


now if ur looking for inspiration to help u while ur playing to a backing track these two guys are good:

http://www.youtube.com/user/RobChappers
(inspirational to listen to , if ur into joe sach style)

http://www.youtube.com/user/Wallimann
(he specializes in improvising)
they also have lessons on soloing (try this if ur an intermediate n up)

anyway ill stop here, dont wanna overwelm u with links

hope I've helped....
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
Last edited by Marqway at Nov 6, 2011,
#10
Just practice. "If it sounds good its good" (quoted from yngwie malmsteen). Practice scales, tapping, arpeggios, whatever you like the sound of. So if you don't like the sound of arpeggios or think you may never use it, don't practice it just because it looks cool. You have to discover the answers yourself if you really want to know how. All I can tell you is learn scales and the sounds of them and how to really SPEAK with your notes. Apply this concept to backing tracks and also without backing tracks.
#11
alright guys, thanks.
I'm going to look into all the things, i appreciate all your replys.

But I do have a question about borrowing licks and not "stealing" them

Frusciante does this lick that repeats goes:

B--------5h7p5------
G-----------------6---
On various places on the neck (usually the same two strings though), if i used that lick occasionally would that mean I'm influenced by him or flat on stealing it? I know that may be a dumb question but I always look at that being his kinda lick(Obviously not saying it is, just to me it seems like his "signature" go to one)

Same with hendrix's lick that goes(repeating fast like the froosh one):

e-------12p9------9--
B---------------12------
#13
At this point in your development, don't worry about the distinction between borrowing and stealing licks.

So long as you are developing your ear, you will eventually develop your own voice, your own set of signature licks. Everybody goes through a phase of aping their heroes. Heck, you can hear a bunch of Albert King if you listen to Clapton, and Clapton was already being hailed as "god" at the time.

But, I mean it, don't stint on the ear training. That's the key to getting to a place where you're expressing YOU and not your influences. It may take a while. Stay at it.
#15
Quote by HotspurJr
At this point in your development, don't worry about the distinction between borrowing and stealing licks.

So long as you are developing your ear, you will eventually develop your own voice, your own set of signature licks. Everybody goes through a phase of aping their heroes. Heck, you can hear a bunch of Albert King if you listen to Clapton, and Clapton was already being hailed as "god" at the time.

But, I mean it, don't stint on the ear training. That's the key to getting to a place where you're expressing YOU and not your influences. It may take a while. Stay at it.



Can you maybe explain the whole "develop your ear" thing? if you mean transcribe I can do that pretty decent.

@Cavalcade alright cool, i'm not that familiar with much blues at this point.

@CarsonStevens alright, next time at barnes and nobles i'll check for it.

Also, I missed Spreadsheet's original post in this thread but what are target notes?
#16
Don't forget, music theory is just a tool in the arsenal of the guitarist/musician!

When you can forget what you've learned and just play what comes to your fingers while playing by instinct, that is the heart of improvisation essentially.

Don't get me wrong, the use of theoretical elements while improvising will aid you immeasurably, but don't get caught up in the "how" just do it. That's how you start.

To be honest, you're only steps ahead of me in what you know I bet, and thus we are in the same boat really. So take this with a grain or two of salt and digest it a bit.

I know you aren't talking anything about theory, but trust me on this... you'll find yourself at the cross-roads of Theory and Improvisation... with that temptress daemoness trying to tempt you to sell your soul ... we'll all be there at some point... what you do is up to you!
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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Last edited by Outside Octaves at Nov 8, 2011,