#1
I just got a guitar put together from parts. I set it all up and the OFR (an 80's one off a Kramer), won't stay in tune when I dive bomb. I dive bomb once and all the strings sharpen but I can dive bomb again and again after that and the strings always go back to the pitch they went to after the fist dive bomb. So, it's like it stays in tune after the first use of the trem but the problem is the first use of the trem puts it all out of tune haha. If that makes sense. Dose anyone know how to fix this?
#2
Did you put a locking nut on the guitar?
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#3
If you did put a locking nut on then the chances are that the knife edge is slipping and it needs to be lubricated and possibly sharpened. Check the floyd setup thread (it may just be a section of the guitar setup thread, I've forgotten) on how to do that since I'm not sure.
Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?


http://www.youtube.com/user/Joeseffel


Quote by smcstoronto1234

So very true...
#4
Quote by Bhaok
Did you put a locking nut on the guitar?


Yes

And I'll try lubricating it in the morning. That is one thing I forgot to do while setting up and remeberd after I posted this.
But why would it be going back to the same pitch every time except after the first use of the trem?
Last edited by da_ at Nov 6, 2011,
#6
Quote by tappooh
what happens when you pull up? does it go back in tune?


It's not floating so I can't pull up. But I'd say if I could it wouldn't go back in tune since it is going sharp.
#7
Hold on. An OFR is a floating trem. If it isn't completely floating, it might have been blocked by someone, which could be your problem.

On the other hand, you say it's an old Kramer model - any chance of a pic? That might help us understand what we're working with here
#8
OFR's don't need to be floating. If it isn't a recessed floyd it is ushally not floating inless it has been set up to. And that involves puting a shim in the neck pocket to angle the neck and putting the pivot posts higer so the floyd is slightly off the body and floating. And I can post a pic if you need one but I don't see how much it would help. It is pretty much just the same as a new OFR.
#9
Vanhalen kramer had a proper floyd but it rested on the body so it could only go down, just the way he liked it.
#10
The reason for the pitch jump it that the knife edge is resting on the posts and jumping between one of 2 points when you dive/pull, hence the exact changes each time.
Assuming the problem lies with lubrication.
Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?


http://www.youtube.com/user/Joeseffel


Quote by smcstoronto1234

So very true...
#11
Quote by Twidler
Vanhalen kramer had a proper floyd but it rested on the body so it could only go down, just the way he liked it.

Yes Most (all?) 80's Kramers were like this inless set up diffrently after they had come out of the factory.

Quote by WarriorArtist94
The reason for the pitch jump it that the knife edge is resting on the posts and jumping between one of 2 points when you dive/pull, hence the exact changes each time.
Assuming the problem lies with lubrication.


I still think it might be the lubrication too. Thanks for pointing it out I still havn't had a chance to lube it up yet
#12
Lube nothing, if it's a locking one it's the knife edges or the posts, one or the other or both need replaced. Lube lol, Lube's for dry ladies
#13
I just lubed it up and adjusted the pivot poles and it is alot better but its still going out of tune. This time its not going out by as much and dosn't always go back to the same pitch. Pretty much how a normal floyd would act. It might just be the strings havn't stretched enough but I have stretched them alot. I'll see what its like after a couple of days and maybe put a diffrent set of strings on. But dose anyone have any other ideas of what it would be?
#14
Quote by da_
I just lubed it up and adjusted the pivot poles and it is alot better but its still going out of tune. This time its not going out by as much and dosn't always go back to the same pitch. Pretty much how a normal floyd would act. It might just be the strings havn't stretched enough but I have stretched them alot. I'll see what its like after a couple of days and maybe put a diffrent set of strings on. But dose anyone have any other ideas of what it would be?



You what? A proper floyd goes back to perfect pitch, anything else isn't right, it means there's something worn. I've got two of them and never ever do they lose pitch when I let off the bar. If it doesn't go back to pitch and the strings are setlled in then you've got 1. a loose nut 2. worn posts 3. worn knife edges or a mixture of all three.
#15
Quote by Twidler
You what?


I lubricated the trem, like any metal on metal should be. And like most people who know what they are doing do to there floyds and other parts of there guitars.

It has a brand new nut and brand new pivot posts and the knife edges don't seem to be worn. I might try and sharpen them though and see if that helps.
#16
It might seem like a stupid question, but did you set up the intonation and whatnot when you put everything together?

It's surprising how many people "set up" their guitars without performing an actual set-up.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#17
Quote by da_
I lubricated the trem, like any metal on metal should be. And like most people who know what they are doing do to there floyds and other parts of there guitars.

It has a brand new nut and brand new pivot posts and the knife edges don't seem to be worn. I might try and sharpen them though and see if that helps.



It's a knife edge sitting in the bottom of a V, it doesn't need lubed. It's a pivot point rather than anything rubbing so lubrication is pointless. I've been messing with guitars for over 20 years and floyds for a good 15 of them, I've never had to lube a floyd and they always go back to perfect tuning after the furthest stretch or the biggest dive. If yours is sticking for any reason at all then there's something wrong with it. Have you also checked the nut is tight? You'll either have a couple of screws from the top or from underneath, I've seen them loose once. Apart from that though it's always wear at the other end and I would take it back, it shouldn't happen on a new guitar unless it's a really cheap one.
Last edited by Twidler at Nov 7, 2011,
#18
Quote by Hail
It might seem like a stupid question, but did you set up the intonation and whatnot when you put everything together?

It's surprising how many people "set up" their guitars without performing an actual set-up.


Yup I set the intonation. I'm pretty sure I did a full set up.
Just so you guys know, I'm not a guitar noob haha. I have built (full builds from scratch. Not just put togthers like this guitar was) a couple of guitars but havn't had much experiance with floyds.
#19
Noob or non noob man, it's like I said, either the nut is loose or something's worn/not fitting right. I was talking to someone else on here recently who had a brand new guitar with a floyd rose, he had similar problems to you but it turned out although the guitar was new it had been fairly hammered in the shop as far as the whammy bar went, his posts and knife edges were a mess. Once they're a mess too attacking them with a file doesn't seem to really cure it most of the time but the parts can all be bought sperately for reasonable money.
#20
Its an 80's Original Floyd Rose. So its not new but it was on a professional guitarists backup guitar who had regular services on his guitar and treated it right. Its also not a new guitar, its a parts guitar put together from original 80's Kramer parts. So its not a cheap guitar either. The knife edges aren’t worn out. You're right, Floyds don't need lube but like I said, its metal rubbing on metal, and yes, it is rubbing like any trem with pivot posts insteed of screws (vintage fender trem). So lube helps, allot. And the nut is tight.
#21
After reading your first post again I've come to the conclusion that your guitar is wierd lol. Going sharp after a divebomb? Wtf? Are you 100% sure there's no grooving on the posts? They shouldn't rub either, because the groove in the posts should be nice and clean with a nice sharp V shape and the knife edges should be spot on and nice and sharp the whole thing should just pivot. I know some folk like to put a little bit of graphite on them but I never have and I've never had any problems at all, my guitars both go back to perfect pitch everytime. The fact it's going sharp makes me still think that it's either the posts or knife edges unless you can come up with anything. Worn springs would more likely go flat unless they're catching on anything, there's no foam in the back or covers on the springs?
#22
I pulled it all apart again and found two of the screws that are used to set the saddle in place for the inotation were rubing on the guitar body. This could have been whats wrong so I shimed the neck and set the bridge up so it was floating so the screws couldn't dig in but now the springs are rubing on the bottom of the cavity. This could have been happening before I put the floyd higher aswell but I'm not sure. I have a spear spring claw so I'm going to try bend it and see if that brings the springs higher and stops them rubing. If that dosn't work I will try put the bridge back down and hope the springs wern't rubing before I put the bridge up and just file the screws shorter so they don't stick out the bottom of the bridge and dig in to the body. Inless you or anybody else has any other suggestions. Thanks.