#1
Hey folks, I'm about to record some demos, acoustic-ish style, two guitars and vocals..

I use a UX1 line-6 interface, recording only one guitar part at a time, using the Pod Farm software and audacity, i've tried running it through the dry settings, but the recording quality still isn't of the greatest quality.. How can I make the quality better?

Also when i use audacity to record multiple guitar layers individual, the rhythm and lead parts.. there is some sort of delay, and the second layer never sits where i recorded it? if this makes any sense? it sounds off.

I usually mix and master in fl studio, just take the audio files over and finalize it there, and everything seems to be fine there. It's just the audio capturing process i have trouble with.. It never seems to match the sound quality when I'm playing it real time through my speakers.

Some people have recommended reaper, but I don't really like it all too much.

Anyone able to offer some help? thanks
#2
Get pro tools and an MBox 3 Pro, and some SM57's
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#3
Quote by JDJBrooks
Get pro tools and an MBox 3 Pro, and some SM57's


I think i'd rather just use FL studio man, i'm in my environment there.
#5
Really - Learn to use Reaper. If you plan on getting at all serious with your recordings, you will learn fast that Audacity is junk for recording seriously and FL Studio is less than ideal. They are both catered to newer users to recording, which is good, but they also don't offer many of the useful features most of the professional DAWs have in them.

Reaper is much more powerful than both of those softwares. It might be a learning curve, since you've already been accustomed to the stripped down, ease of use of the two you're using, but once you get the hang of it, you'll be doing things quicker and getting much better results than you would in Audacity or FL Studio.

Quote by JDJBrooks
Get pro tools and an MBox 3 Pro, and some SM57's

Why? There's nothing wrong with the TS's hardware setup for what he wants.

The Mbox is so overrated it's not even funny. Horrible, horrible, mic preamps for the price. $720 for the Pro is a joke, the Focusrite Saffire Pro 40 is $220 cheaper for a new one ($360 cheaper if you buy it on eBay), has twice the mic inputs (expandable via ADAT to 4 times the amount of mic inputs) and sounds much more professional. You might not get Pro Tools LE with it, but with what you saved, you could easily pick up Pro Tools 9 used and have the full version of the software, and save a good chunk of cash. Or, you could just use Reaper and save a ton of cash.
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#6
Quote by MatrixClaw
Really - Learn to use Reaper. If you plan on getting at all serious with your recordings, you will learn fast that Audacity is junk for recording seriously and FL Studio is less than ideal. They are both catered to newer users to recording, which is good, but they also don't offer many of the useful features most of the professional DAWs have in them.

Reaper is much more powerful than both of those softwares. It might be a learning curve, since you've already been accustomed to the stripped down, ease of use of the two you're using, but once you get the hang of it, you'll be doing things quicker and getting much better results than you would in Audacity or FL Studio.


Why? There's nothing wrong with the TS's hardware setup for what he wants.

The Mbox is so overrated it's not even funny. Horrible, horrible, mic preamps for the price. $720 for the Pro is a joke, the Focusrite Saffire Pro 40 is $220 cheaper for a new one ($360 cheaper if you buy it on eBay), has twice the mic inputs (expandable via ADAT to 4 times the amount of mic inputs) and sounds much more professional. You might not get Pro Tools LE with it, but with what you saved, you could easily pick up Pro Tools 9 used and have the full version of the software, and save a good chunk of cash. Or, you could just use Reaper and save a ton of cash.


I do respect and understand what you're saying, it's just, I'm only doing what I feel suits my needs.

I use audacity ONLY to record and then to bring them over to FL to mix and master, and I honestly think FL is a great tool, very under-rated, for organisation and mastering, individually and overall. I do want to get more into reaper and I will.

But what i'm asking is really just a better way to record through my interface, to take into FL studio.. I'm comfortable there, and have been using it for years, so that's not the part I want to change.. It's getting the best possible recordings from my computer
#7
if you want to use your setup, record a single track at a time in audacity. export it as a .wav file without doing anything else first. save, then open up a new instance of audacity to record your second track. what makes it difficult is that you cant have playback of your first track to listen to. metronome, sure, playback, nope. it kinda sucks, but i used to do the same thing for a long time. i really liked FL for mixing and putting in VSTs and VSTis, but the old versions didnt work well for recording.

as for the actual quality, check the settings in audacity. dont have a copy of it any more, but make sure you are recording with enough quality that your mix isnt suffering. audacity may lower the quality for initial setup.

and i do agree, FL is a very solid tool for mixing. if you have a newer version (not sure what they are at now) then you can probably record in it just fine. older versions used to be a bit awkward, but its supposedly a lot better.
#8
If you're having latency, lower your buffer size the lowest you can go without buffer underruns happening.

I also agree you should get Reaper instead of using FL Studio. FL Studio is good for making beats, but as a recording DAW it's honestly not very good.