#1
hi there everyone, i've been having a hard time figuring out how to hold the harmonics and make em squeal with the whammy bar, any pointers? I've watched a couple of vids on youtube and it sort of works but i'd like to know if theres other similar techniques that can be applied for the same results. Cheers
Guitars : Jackson king v js30,xpt 700,bc rich bich,'76 ibanez les paul copy
Gear: Mt-2,avt 150h head cab,Randall RH50,Pod XT Pro
#2
Would probably be a good thing if we knew how you were doing it to begin with so we know if what we could say even is different anyway...
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#3
okay from what i gathered off the videos, i pull off at the 5th 7th or 12th fret of the G string, and dump the bar right down(strings kinda go out of tension and floppy) and as it comes back up i gotta try and catch the harmonic or squealing noise and then go up and down with the bar ?
Guitars : Jackson king v js30,xpt 700,bc rich bich,'76 ibanez les paul copy
Gear: Mt-2,avt 150h head cab,Randall RH50,Pod XT Pro
#4
Ok, you're working with the Dimebag method then, there's also:

The Satch method where you bring your fretting hand to the tremolo, dump the bar and then hit a pinch harmonic on the open string before bringing the bar back up. ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CWC9mOUdMA )

The Matthias Eklundh method: hard to describe I think so just have a link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XROFYC7z5so

The only other method I'm aware of is where you dump the bar and pick the natural harmonic you want before raising the bar to pitch.


That's about all I can think of off the top of my head, there may be other ways of doing it though.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Nov 6, 2011,
#5
that video's awesome explains it quite well, even though his accent is weird and he talks really fast, cheers for that
Guitars : Jackson king v js30,xpt 700,bc rich bich,'76 ibanez les paul copy
Gear: Mt-2,avt 150h head cab,Randall RH50,Pod XT Pro
#6
Steve´s take on it (works for virtually anything in life)

The following exercise will help you develop your musical meditation skills. Take one isolated musical idea, such as a single chord or riff. For our example, let's take vibrato. Vibrato is a very expressive technique, and can say a thousand different things when properly used (or misused). Sit with your guitar and a clock, and vibrate a note for one hour. Sounds simple, but here's the catch...

Never deviate from holding that note.

Pick it as many times as you like. Try many different vibrato approaches (fast, slow, soulful, mellifluous, etc).

Most important, don't let your mind wander. When you find yourself thinking of anything other than vibrato (and you will, probably in the first few seconds), pull your mind back to the note. Your mind will wander off into thoughts such as "Am I doing this right?", then "Boy, what a waste of time this is!" Eventually, you'll find yourself thinking about your friends, your financial situation, what you did yesterday, what you're going to do tomorrow, and of course, "Let's eat!" This is the hard part. Just keep pulling your mind back to vibrating that note. It's a discipline worth working on.

Eventually, you'll exhaust all conventional vibrato approaches, all the ways you saw someone else do it. Then (if you have the discipline to continue), your mind will enter private realms and you will reach deeper into your own uniqueness for different ideas.

You may have to start practicing this technique little by little, doing it for just five or ten minutes. Try timing yourself. Ultimately, you'll find that when it comes time to "just play", you'll use these vibratos with great ease, and you will discover something different in your playing.

You can practice this exercise with any riff, solo, or chord change. Just keep your mind on it and constantly analyze your performance. It can become very soulful. You might, for example, take just two notes — any two — and play them for an hour without straying from them. Try any approach; stretch them, use different picking styles, play hard or soft, make the notes long or short, or vibrate them.

One of the great things you'll gain from this type of practicing is authority. When you play something, you'll feel confident about pulling it off with flying colors.

But most important, you'll gain discipline. Great results require discipline, and meditation is a discipline. But if you are really into this, it won't seem like a discipline, but a pleasure. But there's one thing for sure: Nothing you read in a column can teach you anything. You just have to do it!