Poll: What's your preferes method of Recording?
Poll Options
View poll results: What's your preferes method of Recording?
I record and mix everything myself at home.
23 66%
I'd prefer to use a professional engineer and studio
6 17%
I record it all myself, but I'd pay someone to mix for me (in person or via online)
4 11%
I'd pay someone to record me/us at home/rehearsal room etc and mix it (minus studio costs)
2 6%
Voters: 35.
#1
Hey Guys,

I'm interested to find out what the general view is from bands today on recording. Most people nowadays have some form of home recording setup. Why, even the most basic (audacity software for example) is more advanced then what was used to make some of the most influential albums in the history of recorded sound.

So, what do you think? Would you prefer to record, produce and mix all of your own music, or would you still be happy to pay an engineer and/or producer to do it with you in a professional recording facility.

There are a few options in the poll. Please let me know which you would favour, and if you'd like to leave a reason, please do!
member number 14 of the UG John frusciante fan club

Founder of the 'the John Frusciante ****ing sucks!Club!" sucks, club!
Last edited by Eddy Hitler at Nov 6, 2011,
#4
Home for Demo/EP quality. Pro studio for Album quality. Mainly due to drums. At home I use programmed drums but in the studio i'd use live drums.

But yeah, local studios cost a lot and I can normally do as well, if not better with my own equipment/experience .
#5
Find and awesome mixing engineer who works from their home, track everything but drums there. Outsource your drums to a studio.

should sound pro but save quite a bit of $$$
#6
If someone in the band has the time, money and interest to get into recording seriously (as a hobby/career), it's a great solution. However, you're talking a minimum of 6 months to a year of work before you'll be getting good results.

Bands who decide to self-record just to save money, with no previous experience, will get you dreadful results and waste a lot of money. It takes a long time to learn to engineer and mix even a basic demo so it doesn't sound dreadful.
It's a false economy; demo studios really aren't that expensive (you can get a radio-quality demo for £30-£150 here), it's certainly much cheaper than getting gear to record yourself if you're starting from scratch.
#7
I Record Myself. But that because i'm studying in that field and I Record and mix people for money.

The advantage of going to a pro in a studio is all the gear you just don't have access to in you're usual home Setup. Also Studios are often Acoustically treated VS. your friends bedroom with frequencies going all over the place.
#8
I would probably record everything myself on my home setup and have someone else mix it. Not because I can't mix it myself, but because I find mixing my own stuff extremely boring and I'm so damn picky with my own songs, that after I get a mix I really like, I listen to it a week later and completely hate it
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#9
I usually like to do everything myself. I can get a decent sound out of what I use for a setup. If my hard drives dont crash on me, I'm usually able to mix a decent session.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
Quote by Eddy Hitler
Why, even the most basic (audacity software for example) is more advanced then what was used to make some of the most influential albums in the history of recorded sound.


Name one (bonus points for not naming black metal)
#12
I record and mix everything myself, but that's just as a hobby. If I was going to be using the recording for any form of professional use, I'd have the recording done professionally.
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#13
Quote by Eddy Hitler
Why, even the most basic (audacity software for example) is more advanced then what was used to make some of the most influential albums in the history of recorded sound.


This makes a supposition that it is the recording software that makes the recording. The reality is that the software manipulates the sound after the recording has been made.

The most influential albums of all time have a lot of things that most of us do NOT have at home:
-high end microphones
-high end preamps
-experienced engineers/producers
-treated rooms in specially designed spaces

There's a start. Those things are WAAAAAY more important than whether you use Cubase, ProTools or Audacity.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Quote by xFilth
Name one (bonus points for not naming black metal)



....Anything before the digital era....

People use to record on tape ya know.
#15
I have to say I enjoyed recording in a studio much more than I have at home. It's like having someone work for you.
#16
Quote by ShevanelFlip
....Anything before the digital era....

People use to record on tape ya know.


So you're saying that an old analogue studio will produce worse quality than any studio that uses audacity?
#17
Bands pay me to record, people who have been through audio engineering courses before want to work with me, it's worth noting that this isn't because I have fancy gear - because I merely have enough to get results, it's about three things:

1. Knowledge - I have accumulated more knowledge and know where said knowledge is relevant and applicable, this knowledge it should be said is freely available but no one wants to trawl internet forums for it which leads onto the next point...

2. I am meticulous - I go through every single detail and pull as much stuff out as I can - most people don't want to do this, because it can be tedious, I will automate every note on the bass and vocals, spend hours editing drums and I also offer good outside perspective - I've played in and recorded bands for a while now and musically I know what works and how much to make people work hard and when to back off. Bands can get snappy if someone internal is recording - there becomes a power conflict, you can remove this by bringing in someone external because they can say more and remain impartial. Musicians are also lazy and sometimes need someone to give them a push - I make sure they work hard when they are on the clock so they get the long term result they want and not the short term one ie slacking off.

3. I am consistent - this mainly a result of the first two but I give every product my utmost time and dedication to get as much out of it as possible, at some point of it you have to let go but that's not until you have exposed every little bit of goodness and grace that is in that particular song.

On top of that you have to appreciate that this is a skillset and as such takes time to master - as long as guitar to truly articulate - if not longer and as with any skillset if you are not actively working to get better and improve at it you will remain static.

Every day I learn something new.
Owen - Sound Engineer - Mixing & Editing Available, PM for details.
#18
Quote by xFilth
So you're saying that an old analogue studio will produce worse quality than any studio that uses audacity?



No.well depend of the Studio , old doesnt = better

I think What he ments, at least that's how I see it, is that nowadays you can get VERY decent sound that, done right, can sound pro for a very cheap prices. I mean Anybody nowadays can start a studio home and with time get a decent result.

Point is technology makes it way easier today.


...nowadays....
Last edited by ShevanelFlip at Nov 7, 2011,
#19
Yeah the most important attributes of recording are time and comfort.

The band need to be at ease, I am much more secure in the results I can get from recording in someones living room for 10 hours than recording in a proper studio for 3. Time invested is definitely the most important part of any equation, which is why with accessibility we now have situation where anyone can do this, this annoys some elitist old timer mentality where you had to have proper financial backing or support but I honestly couldn't give a shít about this because accessibility doesnt necessitate better results. Hard work does. If you work hard you should be rewarded - just because everyone on this planet plays guitar doesn't mean they don't go and watch some other fúcker perform on their friday off, why, because that person standing up there worked hard and found their niche; no matter how exposed the market was. Most people are lazy, it's easy to capitalise on that by being the one guy who works his arse off.
Owen - Sound Engineer - Mixing & Editing Available, PM for details.
Last edited by Beefmo at Nov 7, 2011,
#20
In response to Xfilth;

Sgt Peppers
Pet Sounds
Black Sabbath
The Ramones
Maggot Brain

I'm talking particularly here about features and functions available, not quality. With just audacity youve a much higher track count then was available, and non destructive editing, and not t o mention the drop down menu with all the effects (time and dynamics based).

Obviously what was available then was limited by its period in time, and was still top quality.
member number 14 of the UG John frusciante fan club

Founder of the 'the John Frusciante ****ing sucks!Club!" sucks, club!
Last edited by Eddy Hitler at Nov 7, 2011,
#21
In response to axemanchris;

I absolutley agree. I am myself an engineer.

with this poll though, I'm just interested to gauge peoples opinions. Obviously I would say a good studio, good mics, good mic pres, good ears (extremely important!!!!) and all the rest make the recording.

But despite this, people will still go for D.I.Y for reasons stated here, the time it allows you, the control you have over your own work, and the fact it can cost you little or nothing to get some sort of setup.

I also just chose auadacity as an example because its free
member number 14 of the UG John frusciante fan club

Founder of the 'the John Frusciante ****ing sucks!Club!" sucks, club!
Last edited by Eddy Hitler at Nov 7, 2011,
#22
Another reason I like to D.I.Y. is because, now that I have a new halfway decent laptop, I can mix and do a lot of work outside of my house. I mean, outside of anything that requires a physical instrument, I can do it wherever I feel like. I know I'm going to be spending a shit ton of time at work for the holiday season (Yay Retail) so I'll probably have my laptop out in the break room doing mixing.

I know I'm not going to get the results of a Pro Studio. But, I'll probably be able to pull off results similar to most of the home studios in my area. I've got plenty of plugins, VIs and enough knowledge on how to use them that I can do what I want without the high budget.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#23
i like to record and mix my own stuff. more as a hobby because i enjoy it than because i am going to put out music in a professional or semi-professional type of atmosphere. i can put out stuff that is fairly listenable

if i was putting out something that i wanted to sound a bit more polished, i would pay to have at least some of it done by someone else. could range from everything done in studio to just having someone mix it. i think if i was going to go that route, i would record DIs of guitars and bass myself and have them re-amp them in a studio. i feel thats a nice balance of time/comfort of home recording (to get the best take) and using the equipment and knowledge available at a studio.

so i could really go for any of the options. but for now, ill just record myself at home. for anything more than a demo, i want someone who knows more than me to provide some (or a lot of) assistance.
#24
I put myself down as "I record and mix everything myself." However, I don't feel that is the right choice for most people.

When I first got into this game a little over ten years ago (well... not counting the few years I spent in the late '80's/early '90's with my Fostex X260 4-track...), I did so with probably the same kind of expectations everyone else has.

"Man, I'm gonna get me some recording software and it'll be just like having a pro studio in my own home. Man, I'll be able to do edits and tracks on top of tracks all day long and never wish for someone else's studio time again."

... and with that, I plugged my guitar into my Soundblaster card using a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter and wondered why the hell I can't get a decent sound to save my life.

Ten years in and a few thousand dollars worth of gear later, I consider myself pretty decent at recording. I'm not disappointed about that, but for a person who just wants to make a demo, instead of going with "ten years and a few thousand dollars", I'd personally hope for something more along the lines of "a weekend and a few hundred dollars."

During that ten years, I have spent SO much time learning about recording, and that time has to come from somewhere. It's not like I spent all those hours just watching TV, so I gave up watching TV and I was good. Basically, it came at the expense of practicing guitar, which I basically never do anymore.

What kind of cost, time, and sacrifices are a person willing to make to learn recording? If the answer is "not that much", then you'd best skip the pirated version of Sonar, the soundblaster card and a couple of SM57-knock-offs and just spend a weekend checking into a project studio.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#25
Looks like I am with the masses on this one. I have paid for several recordings. And the very first one we did ourselves with me mixing sounded better than the average $500 demo but not as good as real pro studio.

I still plan to do myself but want to find a skilled mixer/master

A good example is on our page.

The song Pargola I did.

All the others were done, well for free by family but. Along the $500 demo vein. You will hear the differences.

Some good and bad on both but the end result is that our free recording overall we like better.
Reverbnation.com/offthewitness
Last edited by maddnotez at Nov 11, 2011,