#1
Is there anything like the different Major scale keys for chords but for solo notes so you have an idea of which notes sound good together, I am pretty good at making catchy chord patterns and stuff but i could not make a riff or solo to save my live. please help meh!
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#2
Quote by Cloudkicker
Is there anything like the different Major scale keys for chords but for solo notes so you have an idea of which notes sound good together, I am pretty good at making catchy chord patterns and stuff but i could not make a riff or solo to save my live. please help meh!


Just learn some modes and scales or learn some lead parts of your favourite bands. It'll come naturally after a while :P
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#3
When coming up with leads and melodies, the strongest notes will usually be the ones that are part of the chord. So if the chord is Dm, the melody over that will be strongest when the note is D, F, or A. Try to make the stronger notes line up with the on-beat.
Traditional folk songs tend to be good examples of this, because of how they're written. If that's not really your speed, try folk metal. Listen to the melodies in these songs, and see when the chord tones and non-chord tones are used:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIS0IuC7_d8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaqqsTVuCnI
I know that sounded complicated (that's how theory is...), so if that's too much: Just check out some melodic metal bands, play their guitar parts, and see what you pick up.
Don't be discouraged by all the theory stuff; most guitarists don't even think about it. It'll come naturally after a while. I'm just describing how it works.
Cheers.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Nov 6, 2011,
#4
Quote by Cavalcade
When coming up with leads and melodies, the strongest notes will usually be the ones that are part of the chord. So if the chord is Dm, the melody over that will be strongest when the note is D, F, or A. Try to make the stronger notes line up with the on-beat.
Traditional folk songs tend to be good examples of this, because of how they're written. If that's not really your speed, try folk metal. Listen to the melodies in these songs, and see when the chord tones and non-chord tones are used:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIS0IuC7_d8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaqqsTVuCnI
I know that sounded complicated (that's how theory is...), so if that's too much: Just check out some melodic metal bands, play their guitar parts, and see what you pick up.
Don't be discouraged by all the theory stuff; most guitarists don't even think about it. It'll come naturally after a while. I'm just describing how it works.
Cheers.

what about when you are using chords in drop tuning? how will the whole chord thing work if its just one fret chords.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#5
Quote by Cloudkicker
what about when you are using chords in drop tuning? how will the whole chord thing work if its just one fret chords.

Well there you will at least have the first and the fifth of the chords, so if you have the bottom 3 strings open you have a D, the root, and an A, the fifth. Those two notes are guaranteed to sound right and if you know the scales, and concentrate mostly on those two notes you'll be safe
#6
Quote by Cloudkicker
what about when you are using chords in drop tuning? how will the whole chord thing work if its just one fret chords.

Chords are chords. Tuning doesn't have anything to do with it.
It sounds like you're treating them as just powerchords, and if you want to play melodically, you'll have to think outside the root and fifth. Odds are you're playing simple diatonic progressions, so every power chord implies either a major or minor third.
The trick is to write the chord progression with major or minor chords first, then just play power chords. So if your progression is:
Em C G D Am C G D
you'll play:
E5 C5 G5 D5 A5 C5 G5 D5
but when you're coming up with a melody, you'll act like the chords are:
Em C G D Am C G D
#7
Quote by Cavalcade
Chords are chords. Tuning doesn't have anything to do with it.
It sounds like you're treating them as just powerchords, and if you want to play melodically, you'll have to think outside the root and fifth. Odds are you're playing simple diatonic progressions, so every power chord implies either a major or minor third.
The trick is to write the chord progression with major or minor chords first, then just play power chords. So if your progression is:
Em C G D Am C G D
you'll play:
E5 C5 G5 D5 A5 C5 G5 D5
but when you're coming up with a melody, you'll act like the chords are:
Em C G D Am C G D

That actually makes a lot of sense.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#8
Quote by GangsterLi
Just learn some scales or learn some lead parts of your favourite bands. It'll come naturally after a while :P

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#9
Learn the notes on your fretboard
Learn intervals
Learn how to construct the major scale
Learn how to construct chords
Ignore modes.
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#10
Pretty much what's said above, I like to find "common" notes between the key (and it's associated scale) and the chord played underneath it. Basically emphasising chord tones is where it's at.

I've said this a few times but if you really take the time to analyse Mark Knopfler's stuff and how it relates to the chords underneath, you basically have a textbook on how to construct great solos emphasising chord tones and not needing to resort to accidentals to get a "different" feel within them. His work is inspired.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Have a look at the CAGED system, then you'll see that chords and scales are pretty much the same thing and it will hopefully help you to get around the fretboard easier.
#12
Quote by NorthernPaul
Have a look at the CAGED system, then you'll see that chords and scales are pretty much the same thing and it will hopefully help you to get around the fretboard easier.

TS, this.
#14
Modes are only worthwhile once you know the major and minor scale like the back of your hand. And even then, they aren't gonna be the golden ticket you expect them to be.