#1
2 years ago, I brought a friend into my band to fill in guitars and vocals after our vocalist quit. Throughout this 2 years, it has been a fun yet stressful time with him. He's a good guitarist, and an okay vocalist but a terrible bandmate. We've skipped a few gigs and a lot of band practice because of him, and we're getting terribly sick of his attitude. In Malaysia, getting a gig is almost like finding a needle in straws. His main excuse is that he needs to study (He's a law student), his relative's getting married, he has football practice, he has some taekwondo competition, etc.

Honestly speaking, I really don't wanna kick him out, because he's good, and we have great chemistry jamming and performing together, but his excuses are killing me. And it's extremely hard finding for vocalists for our style. I'm not really free all the time too, as I have to complete my degree and teach guitar at the same time. Can you guys advise me what should I do? My bassist suggests that we kick him out, play 3 piece instead but change our style to playing post rock. I don't have a problem with that, but post rock just isn't really my drummer's style. I don't wanna force him playing something he doesn't enjoy. I wanna keep our vocalist, and just talk to him about his commitment before taking the option of kicking him out. I can understand that he needs to study, but seriously, at the rate we're going, we're not progressing at all. I'm not actually intending for rockstarhood, but at least coming out with albums and gigging and most importantly, fun. Or maybe I'm just taking this music thing too seriously. Sigh.
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#3
I hate to say that it's up to you.

If you think your vocalist is worth waiting for, then keep him in the band and put up with his schedule. If not, then tell him that his schedule just doesn't work with yours and tell him that he's out. At least, talk to him and make sure that both of your goals musically are the same. If you want to play for a living, but he just wants to play for fun, then the relationship is doomed.

If it's possible to play as a 3 piece when he's not there, then do that for gigs where he can't make it, if your drummer plays things that he doesn't enjoy, it will help him grow as a musician. He wouldn't be the first musician that played what he didn't like to because it was his job.
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#4
If he was really keen, he'd make time. Assuming that band practice is on the same day, at the same time, it's quite easy to fit a two hour block into your schedule. Admittedly yes there will be times where he (or any other member of the band) will say "sorry guys, I have x thing on". I'm a lawyer and I've used that excuse once because I had to stay late at the office. And that's really about it. While I was a law student I probably used the "essay" excuse once or twice, not really more.

The reason I didn't use excuses more was because I knew when band practice was on. I wanted to go to it so I did.

I'll forsee that this guy will probably drop out in the future to focus on more important things anyway. I'd advise bringing it up (if you do have a set band practice time) with him.
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#5
Quote by Papabear505


If it's possible to play as a 3 piece when he's not there, then do that for gigs where he can't make it, if your drummer plays things that he doesn't enjoy, it will help him grow as a musician. He wouldn't be the first musician that played what he didn't like to because it was his job.


Bullshit, obviously. If you were a metal guitar player and suddenly forced to play hiphop, would you just go along because 'it'll help you grow as a musician'?
#6
Quote by Soldier Poet
Bullshit, obviously. If you were a metal guitar player and suddenly forced to play hiphop, would you just go along because 'it'll help you grow as a musician'?

Anything that puts you outside of a comfort zone can help you grow as a musician. Taking emphasis from melody and heavyiness to rythym and will most definatley put you in a different headspace and cause you to think about your instrument in a different way. Just because a song isn't outwardly difficult, doesn't mean it won't challenge your skills in a more thougt-filled way.
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Last edited by sonny bb at Nov 7, 2011,
#7
Quote by Soldier Poet
Bullshit, obviously. If you were a metal guitar player and suddenly forced to play hiphop, would you just go along because 'it'll help you grow as a musician'?


Well, thats a bit of a stretch.. but as a Blues/Rock musician, I've played country, BECAUSE IT WAS MY JOB... the part of the post that you quoted you forgot to mention.

He wouldn't be the first musician that played what he didn't like to because it was his job.


I didn't see hip hop mentioned in his OP at all...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!