#1
When you do the 12-bar blues, what is the usual way to improvise a solo on it? Just solo in the main key and play notes which sound good with the other chords (in the ROOT scale), or play individual scales for every chord when the chords change?
I really want to learn to play simple blues improvisation.
thank you
#3
blues scale. So if you're 12 bar blues in E, your chords are E, A, B. Usually with 7s. Your notes you could use in the scale are E, G, A, Bb, B, D, E. Anywhere on the neck. Find ways to bend it and make it sound interesting. There are a few blues tricks you can learn too, but whatever. Go from there man

edit: and it's the same pattern no matter where you start
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Last edited by Dimefromhell12 at Nov 7, 2011,
#5
Here's a very simple Pentatonic scale


and here is a backing track that is pretty simple and slow.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PzyEtQypYA&feature=related

The nice thing about this simple scale is you can move it around anywhere on the fretboard you want...

On this scale, there is a #8 wich means that this example is in the key of C and so is the Backing track, although it makes a "turn around" at the beginning from F to G, then back to the C

Play the notes in the scale, and figure out which ones sound good where...

Give it a shot...
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#6
The blues scale is essentially the pentatonic but with an added flat 5th. Once you recognise it you can spot it in any key. The best way to improvise over blues 12 bar progressions is to keep it simple. Most famous blues solos are the simple ones. Have fun with it and after a little while you start creating some good runs if you do it regularly over backing tracks.
#7
And here you have a more complex article about the pentatonic scale:

1. http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/music-theory/the-pentatonic-scale/

And here is one that can help you to apply it:

2. http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/the-pentatonic-scale-chart/

Good luck !
#8
The fastest way to learn some really "good" blues soloing improv is to steal all the licks you can find. The "language" is the blues pentatonic scale and the "words" are often just short 4 to 12 note phrases strung together in different orders and with different rests (pauses) inserted and usually connected by ascending and descending runs of various lengths

Start by to learn by studying the licks of one of the blues masters, play the licks in different order and even try them backwards. Learn enough licks and you will soon amaze yourself as your vocabulary grows. Play the licks at a faster tempo you got a rock solo.

Just to name a solo that everyones familiar with take a look at Page's Stairway solo, the whole thing is strung together with famous blues licks starting with Albert King then T-Bone Walker to Muddy Waters. Not knocking Page, all the greats do it, from Hendrix to Clapton.
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#13
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#14
Quote by Yekex
When you do the 12-bar blues, what is the usual way to improvise a solo on it? Just solo in the main key and play notes which sound good with the other chords (in the ROOT scale), or play individual scales for every chord when the chords change?
I really want to learn to play simple blues improvisation.
thank you

When starting out, licks are the best way in as they're quick and easy to learn, and transcribing them from other artists is what all the great blues players did.

But when improvising through a blues, try to think in concepts rather than licks. The concept is basically the source where your ideas will come from, rather than trying to memorize every single lick you've ever learned.

Essentially, the blues deals with the I, IV and V chords. Focus on dealing with one at a time, try to exhaust all the ideas you have for the change from I to IV, then move on to the V.

The pentatonic scale is a great place to start, but eventually it'll become boring, you should combine that scale with targeting chord tones, of which some don't lie within the scale. Do you know about guide tones and chord tones?

What you do over the V chord is really the crux moment in a blues.

A word that is tossed around a lot is "phrasing". To understand the language of blues you should try and transcribe other players. BB King, Jimmie Vaughn etc.

If you can, try and find other blues players to jam with, preferably that are better than you. I don't mean that in condescending manner, you really will improve faster that way.
#15
Quote by BlackbirdPie
The fastest way to learn some really "good" blues soloing improv is to steal all the licks you can find. The "language" is the blues pentatonic scale and the "words" are often just short 4 to 12 note phrases strung together in different orders and with different rests (pauses) inserted and usually connected by ascending and descending runs of various lengths

Start by to learn by studying the licks of one of the blues masters, play the licks in different order and even try them backwards. Learn enough licks and you will soon amaze yourself as your vocabulary grows. Play the licks at a faster tempo you got a rock solo.

Just to name a solo that everyones familiar with take a look at Page's Stairway solo, the whole thing is strung together with famous blues licks starting with Albert King then T-Bone Walker to Muddy Waters. Not knocking Page, all the greats do it, from Hendrix to Clapton.


I would agree. If you get a hard time to follow licks you can use song surgeon a slow down music software but it retains the sound quality which I like most. There's a free demo in their somewhere in their page (www.songsurgeon.com). Slowing down music allows you to hear every note that is being played in the segment. Then try to speed up until you can play the normal speed of that solo.
#16
If you're 12 bar blues in E, your chords are E, A, B. Usually with 7s. Your notes you could use in the scale are E, G, A, Bb, B, D, E. Anywhere on the neck. Find ways to bend it and make it sound interesting. There are a few blues tricks you can learn too, but whatever.