#1
Im talking about purely in-key notes.

I heard someone say that if you play a minor 6th over the tonic chord (in a minor key), it will sound horrible because its only a half step away from the perfect 5th. So i tried it out over a backing track and i can confirm its not a notes you want to stay on too long over the tonic chord.

So do all notes 'clash' if they are just a semi-tone from a chord tone ?

was hoping someone could give me a bit of help here
#2
Go on musictheory.net and learn about non chord tones.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Nov 8, 2011,
#3
Quote by mrbabo91
Im talking about purely in-key notes.

I heard someone say that if you play a minor 6th over the tonic chord (in a minor key), it will sound horrible because its only a half step away from the perfect 5th. So i tried it out over a backing track and i can confirm its not a notes you want to stay on too long over the tonic chord.

So do all notes 'clash' if they are just a semi-tone from a chord tone ?

was hoping someone could give me a bit of help here


It depends: for example, a Major 7th, which letter wise is next to a root, but intervallically pitched an octave higher, doesn't clash with the root.

Best,

Sean
#4
Don't be afraid to dissonance!


In my restless dreams...
I see that town.
Silent Hill.
You promised you'd take me there again someday.
But you never did.

Well, I'm alone there now.
In our 'special place'...
Waiting for you.

#6
Quote by Cavalcade
Yes. But that can be used to create tension in the melody.
Also, try playing a major 2nd over a VI chord. You end up with a tritone.

As far as I know that's not true. For example a major vs a minor chord. The third has only a semi-tone difference but it doesn't 'clash' right?

Quote by mrbabo91
So i tried it out over a backing track and i can confirm its not a notes you want to stay on too long over the tonic chord.

Listen to Don't Know Why from Norah Jones. Listen very carefully to the guitar at the beginning, he descends per semi-tone. All the notes the guitarist is playing are definitely notes from the chords used. The 'clash' you're talking about is widely used. Eg.: C7 has that clash with its third and seventh note, but the chord sounds right? It's a matter of knowing/feeling where and when you should place it. It takes some practice, you'll get used to it
Best example of those chords is a full diminish (Cdim7) played as 1 - b3 - b5 - bb7(=6). Dissonance is 1-b5 and b3-bb7
lalala
#7
Quote by Didii
As far as I know that's not true. For example a major vs a minor chord. The third has only a semi-tone difference but it doesn't 'clash' right?

Where are you getting a semi-tone difference in that chord? Between what and what? All I see are thirds and a fourth.
#8
Quote by Cavalcade
Where are you getting a semi-tone difference in that chord? Between what and what? All I see are thirds and a fourth.

I think I interpreted the question wrong. I meant the difference between the third from the major vs the minor is a semi-tone.
lalala
#9
Quote by Didii
I think I interpreted the question wrong. I meant the difference between the third from the major vs the minor is a semi-tone.

Since nobody in their right mind would play the minor and major at the same time, how can they clash?

Yes, I know there's probably a few songs where someone does that.
#10
Quote by mrbabo91
Im talking about purely in-key notes.

I heard someone say that if you play a minor 6th over the tonic chord (in a minor key), it will sound horrible because its only a half step away from the perfect 5th. So i tried it out over a backing track and i can confirm its not a notes you want to stay on too long over the tonic chord.

So do all notes 'clash' if they are just a semi-tone from a chord tone ?

was hoping someone could give me a bit of help here

Depends on context. If you had a chromatically descending bass line from the tonic in a minor key it sounds quite cool.

i - VI in G Minor

Gm - Gm/F-sharp - Gm/F - Gm/E - Gm/Eb

The minor 6 is an interesting one, because if you invert it becomes a major 3rd which is considered fairly consonant, hence the last chord which is actually Ebmaj7.
------
-8--8-8-8-8
-7--7-7-7-[B][color="Red"]7[/COLOR][/B]
-8--8-8-8-8
-10-9-8-7-[B][color="Red"]6[/COLOR][/B]
---------
Last edited by mdc at Nov 9, 2011,
#11
Quote by Cavalcade
Since nobody in their right mind would play the minor and major at the same time, how can they clash?

Yes, I know there's probably a few songs where someone does that.



Jimi Hendrix became famous with it (and yes I read the little ditty in ur post)

It's called a 7#9 chord. (R, 3, 5, b7, #9)

Which is a dominant chord (R, 3, 5, b7) with a #9 added which is enharmonic to the b3.

It's the first chord of purple haze, which appears as the E7#9 chord.

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#14
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Jimi Hendrix became famous with it (and yes I read the little ditty in ur post)

It's called a 7#9 chord. (R, 3, 5, b7, #9)

Which is a dominant chord (R, 3, 5, b7) with a #9 added which is enharmonic to the b3.

It's the first chord of purple haze, which appears as the E7#9 chord.


Considering the amount of drugs Hendrix used, I'm not sure he was ever in a right mind

I do love the sound of that chord tho
#15
Quote by Brainpolice2
Well, notes "clashing" (I.E. dissonance) is a desirable thing in lots of musical contexts. "Clashing" is only something negative when the dissonance is not desired or perhaps if it seems horribly out of context.


This.

There has to be a balance between dissonance and consonance (the opposite of dissonance)- too much consonance and the whole thing will sound kinda boring, flat, and predictable; too much dissonance and it just becomes difficult to listen to!

This also might help:

http://chainsawguitartuition.net/blog/?p=1481