#1
I believe that im ready for guitar tapping, but i just don't know when tapping should be used. what notes do i hit? do i still have to get it through the root chord?
#2
If you don't know when you'd use a technique, you aren't ready to learn it. Tapping has a lot of different uses, ranging from extending legato runs to extending legato runs to include large intervals to creating artificial harmonics.

Tapping is normally an extension of simple hammer-ons and pull-offs. A common usage, popularized by Eddie Van Halen, is to play triads rapidly on a single string. That is by far the most common use that I've come across, though some players (Joe Satriani comes to mind) use it to extend legato runs and increase the intervals they can leap on a single string. I know that Shawn Lane used tapping in his famous performance of Grey Pianos Flying to tap artificial harmonics over a chord (a technique which is sadly overlooked, since you can do some really cool things with that application). Some people (Muhammed Suicmez from Necrophagist comes to mind) use tapping alongside sweep picking to extend arpeggios rapidly while retaining a legato sound. I know that Luke Hoskins of Protest the Hero has done a lot with tapping on their albums Fortress and Scurrilous to create some very interesting lead lines (the tapping parts in Bloodmeat, Hair Trigger, and Tongue-Splitter are good examples of his tapping use).

Essentially, you can do a lot with tapping. It's one of the most versatile techniques out there, though many people stop at the simple triad tapping for some reason.
#3
Quote by Geldin
If you don't know when you'd use a technique, you aren't ready to learn it. Tapping has a lot of different uses, ranging from extending legato runs to extending legato runs to include large intervals to creating artificial harmonics.

Tapping is normally an extension of simple hammer-ons and pull-offs. A common usage, popularized by Eddie Van Halen, is to play triads rapidly on a single string. That is by far the most common use that I've come across, though some players (Joe Satriani comes to mind) use it to extend legato runs and increase the intervals they can leap on a single string. I know that Shawn Lane used tapping in his famous performance of Grey Pianos Flying to tap artificial harmonics over a chord (a technique which is sadly overlooked, since you can do some really cool things with that application). Some people (Muhammed Suicmez from Necrophagist comes to mind) use tapping alongside sweep picking to extend arpeggios rapidly while retaining a legato sound. I know that Luke Hoskins of Protest the Hero has done a lot with tapping on their albums Fortress and Scurrilous to create some very interesting lead lines (the tapping parts in Bloodmeat, Hair Trigger, and Tongue-Splitter are good examples of his tapping use).

Essentially, you can do a lot with tapping. It's one of the most versatile techniques out there, though many people stop at the simple triad tapping for some reason.

This.
Exactly this.
Even down to the specific examples. I was seriously gonna say EVH, Satriani, and then about how PTH uses it for interesting leads.
Good job
#4
thanks for the reply, the truth is i know how to tap and how to do it, i just don't basically know when to start a tap and when to place the note.
#5
The same as any other technique, you apply it where you think it works well. Knowing when to do that comes with practice.

When I started thinking about doing any sort of tapping, I included it in pretty much any way I could. Now I use it for a couple of the spots described above: I'll use it to extend legato runs and swept arpeggios, and I do quite a bit with tapping octave harmonics on chords or bends. I don't really like the "EVH approach" to tapping, so overall I use it very sparingly. It's simply what works best with your personal style.