#1
Can anyone give me advice on how I can go about learning the really fast gallop sounds in songs like Killswitch Engages - Self Revolution. I think generally they are a 16th + 16th + 8th, or the same but in reverse order. You hear this in Iron Maiden songs and all kinds of metal. If someone could explain where my hand should be placed, whether it should be tense or relaxed. Another thing to note is I'm playing mostly in drop C with standard guage strings, which means what would be my E string is slightly looser than if I were in standard tuning - could this be preventing me from accurately doing these gallops? Any advice on this would be REALLY appreciated.
#2
Your strings would be stabler if you got .11s at least. You should always be relaxed. Your hand should be where it always is, which had better be unanchored.
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#3
Quote by zombizombi
Can anyone give me advice on how I can go about learning the really fast gallop sounds in songs like Killswitch Engages - Self Revolution. I think generally they are a 16th + 16th + 8th, or the same but in reverse order. You hear this in Iron Maiden songs and all kinds of metal. If someone could explain where my hand should be placed, whether it should be tense or relaxed. Another thing to note is I'm playing mostly in drop C with standard guage strings, which means what would be my E string is slightly looser than if I were in standard tuning - could this be preventing me from accurately doing these gallops? Any advice on this would be REALLY appreciated.


You should definitely be relaxed - you should always relax as much as you can while playing. After a while gallops will feel so easy and natural. Just practice really really slowly. They're usually 16ths so just try at something really slow like 50 or 60bpm then gradually bring it up. If you start to tense it means you need to drop the tempo a bit. You'll gradually be able to go faster as you go along.

And yeah drop c with too low a guague strings (what do you mean by standard guague? 9s,10s,11s etc?) will probably not help, I find it's noticeably slightly more difficult even when I go to drop D (though that's rare).
#4
Always make sure your hands are relaxed, and practice slowly.
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#5
Oh and another thing. How can I play unanchored and also be palm muting? Isn't resting my palm on the strings a form of anchoring?
Last edited by zombizombi at Nov 9, 2011,
#6
I do anchor. A lot. I guess I should ban myself from that. But when I'm palm muting these gallops, isn't that a form of anchoring? How can I palm mute but remain unanchored? String gauge is 9. Is there a better gauge that will allow relatively decent playing in both standard and drop c tunings?
#7
I use 11s for that.
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#8
Its only anchoring if you are putting pressure down, palm mutes require very little contact.
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#9
Resting your palm on the bridge is not anchoring. Having your fingers touch any part of the body is anchoring though.

I also recommend getting at least .11 gauge strings, but the main key is just to practise this kind of stuff. Try to get your hand confident about gallops, it will feel much more natural if you just practise it for a while with a metronome.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#10
Palm muting isn't anchoring - it's a necessity in many forms of music.

For galloping, place the meat of your right hand as close to the bridge as possible and alternate pick three of the same note/chord slowly. I find that using a thicker pick helps, because it allows me to be more precise. I use a 1mm Cool pick (large equilateral triangle.) Each stroke should sound clearly. Play around with emphasizing one of the three strokes for more 'oomph,' and you'll start to hear the familiar gallops of Killswitch, Metallica, Slayer, Iron Maiden, etc...it's really a "feel" thing, and once you hear it and mess around with it, you'll build it into your muscle memory. Once it's there, THEN and ONLY THEN, can you start to build speed into it.

And since you're into Killswitch, check out As I Lay Dying if you haven't already -- they use even more chugging gallopy riffs than Killswitch Engage.
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Last edited by KailM at Nov 9, 2011,