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#1
I just ripped my strings off and realized my "guitar polish" isn't around. Is lemon oil ok for mahogany?
#4
If you let lemon oil touch mahogany it will burst into flames.
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#7
It's fine yes.
It's only unfinished maple it can;t touch.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
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#9
Quote by Nameless742
It's fine yes.
It's only unfinished maple it can;t touch.

#10
Quote by lucky1978
So basicly, using lemon oil makes douchbags reply to threads? thanks!

You're welcome.
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#11
Regular store bought lemon oil is bad. It might not hurt much if you don't use it often, but if you use it continually, you'll really dry out your fretboard. It's kind of like drinking soda when you're dehydrated. Pays off in the short term, but ****s you in the long term.
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#12
Yep lemon oil is for mahogany and rosewoodfretboard. On maple fretboard you could use a normal guitar cleaning oil. I have no experience with other lemon oils than the Dunlop's one and I highly recommend it. Only costs like few euros a bottle and lasts for a long time.
Last edited by miio at Nov 9, 2011,
#13
Quote by Offworld92
Regular store bought lemon oil is bad. It might not hurt much if you don't use it often, but if you use it continually, you'll really dry out your fretboard. It's kind of like drinking soda when you're dehydrated. Pays off in the short term, but ****s you in the long term.


It’s a good thing we have random internet cranks to explain that we need to stop using a chemical that has been used on wood for centuries with no problems.
#14
Quote by jpnyc
It’s a good thing we have random internet cranks to explain that we need to stop using a chemical that has been used on wood for centuries with no problems.


Lemon oil from a hardware store usually has waxes and other random things in them. That's why you don't want to use those.
#15
Found this on DoucheBag.com

What about furniture care products like "Lemon Pledge"? Aerosol furniture polishes contain waxes, petroleum distillates, emulsifiers (detergents), and lots and lots of water. A very light spray on maple to clean it is fine, but aerosol polishes should not be used on unvarnished fretbaords. We do not want to apply products containing water to the natural finish of a guitar neck and fretboard.

A statement that is seen many times in the newsgroups is "use only 100% lemon oil". First, there are NO furniture care products that actually contain nothing but lemon oil, and even if there were, you would not want to use it on a wood finish. Pure cold-pressed lemon oil is very expensive and could not be marketed for $3 or $4 per bottle like the furniture oils you see in stores.

"But Product XYZ says that it contains 100% lemon oil." Yes, I've seen products with that on the label, and I assure you it is a false and misleading statement. It is used in the context that the product contains 100% lemon oil conditioner as opposed to a cheaper steam-distilled citrus oil or synthetic duplicate made from pine tree wood. Typically 99% or more of the product is a mineral oil with less than 1% lemon oil.

Pure lemon oil (or other citrus oils) is composed of d-limonene at an amount of 90% or more. There are other minor components that give each of the citrus oils its own unique flavors and fragrances. These ingredients include citral, linalool, geraniol, nerol, citronella, pinenes and other terpenes.

Since d-limonene is the majority of lemon oil (or orange oil), we can look at its properties to determine why it is not suited for fretboard care. First, and most importantly, d-limonene is a very strong solvent. It is used to remove glue, paint, grease, oil and other substances. If an oil with a high percentage of d-limonene were applied to a fretboard, it might even begin to loosen the bindings, fret markers or other trim. Additionally, it could soften some varnishes or lacquers used on necks and bodies. Also the vapors of d-limonene are flammable with a flash point of about 124 degrees F, so be sure to leave the bong outside.
#16
Who'da thought lemon oil could be so controversial! Well, I just used it this one time so I hope I'm safe. I probly wouldn't have just outta caution if I'd waited for more posts, oh well. Outta curiousity, what about just mineral oil?
#17
Quote by lucky1978
Who'da thought lemon oil could be so controversial! Well, I just used it this one time so I hope I'm safe. I probly wouldn't have just outta caution if I'd waited for more posts, oh well. Outta curiousity, what about just mineral oil?

That's what you just used (along with some lemon scent to make it smell good). Let us know. I doubt one time is going to do anything.

EDIT: Meaning, it's unlikely you were using REAL lemon oil.
Last edited by thehikingdude at Nov 9, 2011,
#18
oil the board, a couple times a year with a small amount of dunlop fretboard lemon oil.
(or similar)

it's not going to hurt it.

it's fine. use just small amounts and a $5 bottle will last the life of the guitar.

dont use any furniture polishes that contain silicon.

synthetic linseed oil, bore oil (and other products) can be fine,
but there are ready made guitar specific products
that are cheap, mild and used everywhere.

a huge advantage in using a ready made product, like dunlop,
is not having to worry about disposing of dangerous oiled rags afterwards.

for any more info, check out the setup thread, top of the page.

JEn
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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Last edited by jj1565 at Nov 9, 2011,
#19
Lemon oil is for rosewood, ebony and exotic wood fretboards. It's too be used when they need conditioning which is just a couple of times per year if that.

It is absolutely NOT for finished wood of any kind. That includes mahogany.
#20
Quote by grohl1987
Lemon oil is for rosewood, ebony and exotic wood fretboards. It's too be used when they need conditioning which is just a couple of times per year if that.

It is absolutely NOT for finished wood of any kind. That includes mahogany.



This post ftw.

Also lemon oil isn't real oil extract from actual lemons...commercial grade Dunlop Lemon Oil is just mineral oil with some added lemon scent.

A lot of scare mongering and misinformation in this thread.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Nov 10, 2011,
#21
Quote by grohl1987
Lemon oil is for rosewood, ebony and exotic wood fretboards. It's too be used when they need conditioning which is just a couple of times per year if that.

It is absolutely NOT for finished wood of any kind. That includes mahogany.



mahogany can also be unfinished...

i would love to know what guitar he has. and if it's the board or the guitar's wood
he's looking at in the specs.

after reading again i realized, he's anything but specific.

he removed the strings, so i assumed he meant, the fretboard.

but he also mentioned polish, so is he talking about the finished painted areas?
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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Last edited by jj1565 at Nov 10, 2011,
#22
As Jen already said, clean the fretboard with oil twice a year. I Clean it every christmas and summer.


Now to clean, first scrape dirt off gently. I use a credit card flush onto the board.
Apply the oil sparingly. A couple of dabs. Let it sit for a minute.
Work away at dirt with cloth.
Simple.

I do it a lot for my friends. I enjoy cleaning guitars.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#23
If its your fretboard, its not mahogany. Mahogany cant hold frets so its not used as a fretboard. If your referring to the body, then oiling it will do nothing, unless its already an oil finish(which it probably isnt)
#24
so wait,can you use mineral oil without any problems?I clean My guitars with lemon oil and I never have problems(not very often of course)
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#25
Quote by the wako kid
so wait,can you use mineral oil without any problems?I clean My guitars with lemon oil and I never have problems(not very often of course)

Lots of info in this post, if you haven't already read through it. In my opinion, along with facts from the pros, you should not. Unless maybe you're using your guitar as a dining room table or a night stand.
#26
Quote by the wako kid
so wait,can you use mineral oil without any problems?I clean My guitars with lemon oil and I never have problems(not very often of course)


yeah which guitar oil are you specifically using?

if it's a made for guitar product and you don't have a finished board, you should be fine.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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#27
Quote by the wako kid
so wait,can you use mineral oil without any problems?I clean My guitars with lemon oil and I never have problems(not very often of course)


Its the same thing. Lemon oil for fretboard is very light mineral oil with 1% lemon oil for fragrance.

Great for unsealed fretboards of rosewood, ebony. Don't use on sealed fretboards like coated maple

You only need to wipe the fretboard once or twice in a year. A bottle should last decades. Don't go dousing your fretboard with it.

Oils or polishes which contain waxes, silicones are a no no for unsealed fretboards.
The waxes and silicones build up over time. Some can become gummy. And don't use pure citrus oil of any kind
Last edited by Phoenix V at Nov 11, 2011,
#28
there is actually a way you can do it with lighter fluid but i cant remember.lougle it
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#29
Somehow not completely related to the op, but still.
After you apply oil to wood, do you still have to apply other finishes on top of it, like lacquer?
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#30
Quote by Guodlca
Somehow not completely related to the op, but still.
After you apply oil to wood, do you still have to apply other finishes on top of it, like lacquer?


are you talking about finishing the guitar with a tung oil?
as a guitar finish?

and NOT about cleaning the fretboard with a guitar cleaning oil product?

for example if you mean tung oil, then no. no clear coat needed.

if you were to use a stain to color a guitar's natural wood body, then yes, you would use the correct clear coat for that stain.

as for cleaning fretboard. no. you don't add a clear coat on top of dunlop oil.
it's just a cleaning conditioning aid.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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Last edited by jj1565 at Nov 12, 2011,
#31
Quote by jj1565
are you talking about finishing the guitar with a tung oil?
as a guitar finish?

and NOT about cleaning the fretboard with a guitar cleaning oil product?

for example if you mean tung oil, then no. no clear coat needed.

if you were to use a stain to color a guitar's natural wood body, then yes, you would use the correct clear coat for that stain.

as for cleaning fretboard. no. you don't add a clear coat on top of dunlop oil.
it's just a cleaning conditioning aid.

Thanks, almost everything I needed to know.
What about other drying oils, like walnut oil, maybe even almond oil?
Does the final colour or "depthness" effect vary on the oil used, e.g. olive oil would result in a darker colour than mineral oil?
Does a drying oil ever lose colour, and has to be reapplied?
Can some oils harm wood?
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#32
Quote by jj1565
mahogany can also be unfinished...
I have never heard of unfinished mahogany being used other than when someone has stripped the finish off a guitar. Certainly no production guitar will feature unfinished mahogany.
#34
Quote by Guodlca
Thanks, almost everything I needed to know.
What about other drying oils, like walnut oil, maybe even almond oil?
Does the final colour or "depthness" effect vary on the oil used, e.g. olive oil would result in a darker colour than mineral oil?
Does a drying oil ever lose colour, and has to be reapplied?
Can some oils harm wood?



you don't want to use anything like olive oil on guitars.

a lot of oils like the ones you mentioned are too thick
and will rot on the board, creating a horrid smell.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#35
don't use any vegetable based oil on a guitar. As Jenny said, it will spoil, and you have then ruined your fretboard.

I don't know why everybody tries to go DIY on guitar cleaning products. You can buy stuff specifically formulated for guitars for pennies per use. If you use the dunlop lemon oil twice a year, that $5 bottle would probably last you 20 years. That's about $0.12 per application. You'll spend more than that on a pick, and that will only last you a month or so (or less if you lose them as often as I do).

EDIT: After reading through this again, you shouldn't be using oil on any finished surface of the guitar. Just wanted to clarify that. Fretboards are raw wood, which is why they need to be oiled periodically, but the clear coat on a finished surface protects the wood. No further care is required other than periodic cleaning. I ususally don't even use any cleaning products on the finish of my guitar. I just wipe it down with a clean microfiber cloth, and it's good to go. If you do use products, make sure they do not contain silicone.
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Last edited by jpatan at Nov 13, 2011,
#36
Quote by jpatan
don't use any vegetable based oil on a guitar. As Jenny said, it will spoil, and you have then ruined your fretboard.

I don't know why everybody tries to go DIY on guitar cleaning products. You can buy stuff specifically formulated for guitars for pennies per use. If you use the dunlop lemon oil twice a year, that $5 bottle would probably last you 20 years. That's about $0.12 per application. You'll spend more than that on a pick, and that will only last you a month or so (or less if you lose them as often as I do).

EDIT: After reading through this again, you shouldn't be using oil on any finished surface of the guitar. Just wanted to clarify that. Fretboards are raw wood, which is why they need to be oiled periodically, but the clear coat on a finished surface protects the wood. No further care is required other than periodic cleaning. I ususally don't even use any cleaning products on the finish of my guitar. I just wipe it down with a clean microfiber cloth, and it's good to go. If you do use products, make sure they do not contain silicone.



+1

i but i think the ts was vague, started a huge discussion on his intentions and cleaning protocol, then split never to be seen again.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#37
Quote by jj1565
you don't want to use anything like olive oil on guitars.

a lot of oils like the ones you mentioned are too thick
and will rot on the board, creating a horrid smell.

In a nutshell, which oils besides tung could I use? Is it necessary for them to be drying oils? Mineral oil (paraffin) would do?
Today I tried almond oil out, I cut a small thin piece of wood perpendicular to the grain, So it soaked through very easily. Now I'm drying it on a radiator and so far so good, I can see it gathering on top and evaporating slowly. The colour went from natural beech to a walnut colour.
Does a different oil result in different colour?
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#38
Quote by Guodlca
In a nutshell, which oils besides tung could I use? Is it necessary for them to be drying oils? Mineral oil (paraffin) would do?
Today I tried almond oil out, I cut a small thin piece of wood perpendicular to the grain, So it soaked through very easily. Now I'm drying it on a radiator and so far so good, I can see it gathering on top and evaporating slowly. The colour went from natural beech to a walnut colour.
Does a different oil result in different colour?



ok well first you need to be clear as to WHAT you are oiling,

and for what purpose?

are you talking about cleaning and conditioning a fretboard?

or are you looking for a way to stain and protect an unfinished
guitar body, neck (back)?

either way there are threads dedicated to refinishing and protecting
guitar bodies in the Custom section of this site.

to clean an unfinished board, use a dedicated guitar oil / conditioner.

to stain a fretboard, use a fretboard dye.

to stain an unfinished guitar body, use a wood stain.

to protect it, use a clear coat that's compatible with that stain.

or use a protecting one step oil coat like tung oil.
which is easy to apply, but you'll need to maintain.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
Last edited by jj1565 at Nov 13, 2011,
#39
Quote by jj1565
ok well first you need to be clear as to WHAT you are oiling,

and for what purpose?

are you talking about cleaning and conditioning a fretboard?

or are you looking for a way to stain and protect an unfinished
guitar body, neck (back)?

either way there are threads dedicated to refinishing and protecting
guitar bodies in the Custom section of this site.

to clean an unfinished board, use a dedicated guitar oil / conditioner.

to stain a fretboard, use a fretboard dye.

to stain an unfinished guitar body, use a wood stain.

to protect it, use a clear coat that's compatible with that stain.

or use a protecting one step oil coat like tung oil.
which is easy to apply, but you'll need to maintain.

Sorry, forgot to mention what I'll be oiling..
It's made of beech.


Well, I've learned a few things, thanks!
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
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