#1
Hey Pit,
I just did a painting for my technical theatre class and it was my first stab ever at painting and I have to say, I did better than I thought I would and it's peaked my curiosity. I kinda want to paint a few more paintings just to see if it's something I am halfway decent at or if it was a fluke. Are there any painters out there who can give me a few pointers on where to begin?

Btw: It was acrylic painting on a 24x36 canvas, if that makes a difference.

Thanks alot
#4
Quote by Weaponxclaws
Hey Pit,
I just did a painting for my technical theatre class and it was my first stab ever at painting and I have to say, I did better than I thought I would and it's peaked my curiosity. I kinda want to paint a few more paintings just to see if it's something I am halfway decent at or if it was a fluke. Are there any painters out there who can give me a few pointers on where to begin?

Btw: It was acrylic painting on a 24x36 canvas, if that makes a difference.

Thanks alot

dont put too much paint on the potatoes
lift carefully
#5
lets see it. And honestly the best thing you can do is just paint, and keep painting. It is one of those things that you can definitely work at, but you still need natural talent for. There isn't too much learning involved. Also, don't go out buying a book or anything like that. All the info you need is on the internet, just look up general image stuff like color, shape, light, etc.

A good thing to do for beginners is to paint objects and focus on the lighting and color, y'know, standard painting stuff. If you want more abstract stuff there isn't really anything to learn, you can paint whatever you see in your mind.
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#6
I haven't done any portraiture or landscapes since art class days in primary school (no time, alas) but do a reasonable amount of set painting, signwriting and the like. I really wish I could stop procrastinating, get prepped up and just do nothing else for the next few days.

Starting points... it's been so long, I wouldn't know anymore, but basically do as much as you can as often as you can. Practice never hurts . Trying to do more sketching helps, too - it 'gets your eye in,' if that makes sense, and gets you used to looking for shapes and shades and lines. Plus, it's way easier to do on the spur of the moment. As far as technique, try to go from lights to darks (not religiously, but in your general planning for when you're layering up colours). But mainly? have fun.

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Last edited by miss_muso~ at Nov 10, 2011,
#7
I think we need some Bob Ross up in here.



In all seriousness though-- from what I've seen from his shows, I did learn a few techniques. None that I actually use because I don't paint, but I learned them nonetheless.
#8
Yup, I'm a painter.

burndttoast is absolutely right, watch some Bob Ross shows. (The Joy of Painting)
The techniques he used (he's dead now) are easy to learn and just take a little bit of effort to master and can be used for all sorts of subjects. (although Bob himself mainly concentrated on landscapes)

Also, try some different mediums, such as oils on canvas or wood board, watercolour on paper, gouache on stretched paper, chalk pastels on card, ect.
Each medium brings it's own advantages and disadvantages, oils for instance can take months to dry properly, which to many is a disadvantage, because it means you have to safely store the pantings while they dry or you have to wait ages for one coat to dry befor you can add another coat (or, you can learn to paint using the 'wet on wet' technique that Bob Ross used) but the advantage of oils is that you can move the paint around on the canvas for much longer, making slight adjustments (or even scraping sections off with a palet knife and starting them again) until you're happy with your work, whereas acrilics, which are dry within 20 minutes, don't afford you that leeway.

My point is, by trying out all these different mediums, you're likely to find the medium that works the best for you. Personaly, I used to paint mainly in acrilics, (which, quick tip, can be mixed with houshold emulsion paint and used to make incredible wall murals) sometimes in gouache, and I kinda stuck with those, painting mainly cartoony, kinda surrealist stuff for a long time because it was what I knew, what I was used to, but then about 3 years ago I started experimenting with defferent medias and tried oils on canvass together with a more realistic style (funnily enough, after watching Bob Ross on TV) and I've never looked back ever since because I found sometihing that works really well for me. (I have my own portrait business now) But I had to seach and kinda go on an artististic 'voyage of discovery' in order to get there.

Painting anything from real life (or even a made up scene that looks like real life) is all about getting your highlights and shadows in the right place, notice (or decide) what direction the light is hitting the subject from and paint anything that's facing the light lighter than anything that's facing away from the light.
Don't just use black for shadow and white for highlights, notice how light affects the colours of what you are viewing. For instance, grass (which we all generaly consider to be a mid-green) will often look almost yellow in bright light and dark green in shadow.

It's all about REALLY studying your subject. For example, look at this painting of mine of a desert dwelling Middle Eastern man.


He's obviously a dark skinned man, and we may be tempted to paint his skin mainly brown with black shadows and light brown (or even white) highlights, but look closer, there are actualy various shades of blue, purple, grey, brown, ect, because of the way that light affects the colour of his skin as we see it.

Keep at it and develop your art, don't expect superb results straight away and don't be disappointed if a piece doesn't work out as you wanted it, as with anything, the more you do it, the better you'll become at it and we learn at least as much (if not more) from our mistakes as we do from our triumphs.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Nov 10, 2011,