#1
I know this has probably been done to death but i cant find a defintive answer.

Can anyone just tell me which major, minor and pentatonic scales work over the keys A,B,C,D,E,F & G. I know obviously any major scale will work over its respective key but thats not the case with pentatonics. Im really struggling to get my head round it all and whenever i try coming up with anything it sounds shit
#2
The pentatonics are just normal (diatonic) scales with notes missing: A minor pentatonic will work over A minor, B minor pentatonic will work over B minor and so on.

There are other things you can do with them that involve using them to simulate the sound of other scales but that's all you need to know for now.
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#3
Well, a major pentatonic scale is just a normal major scale with the 4th and 7th degrees omitted. You already know you can play the A major scale over a piece in the key of A, so if you wanted to play a pentatonic scale over it, you would use... A major pentatonic

Similarly, a minor pentatonic scale is a minor scale without the second and sixth degrees, so you could use A minor pentatonic over a progression in A minor.
#4
But doesnt the Am pentatonic work over the key of F though as well (thats probably completely wrong), thats what i want a list of, the cross over scales and keys, if you like
#5
Quote by LivinJoke84
But doesnt the Am pentatonic work over the key of F though as well (thats probably completely wrong), thats what i want a list of, the cross over scales and keys, if you like


Yes you can do things like that but that's just using a scale shape that you know in a different place to give yourself a different set of notes while playing something physically familiar.

I would definitely suggest that you get used to using the root scale over whatever you're playing over first (so in F that would be F major pentatonic) and getting used to that before screwing around with other ideas like the one you just mentioned.

If you have that basis of the pentatonics down pretty well then it's always there and you can always go back to it for a set of comfortable and safe licks that you know will always work if you screw something up. If you don't have that basis and you mess up somewhere and get completely lost you've got nothing to fall back on.
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#6
Quote by LivinJoke84
But doesnt the Am pentatonic work over the key of F though as well (thats probably completely wrong), thats what i want a list of, the cross over scales and keys, if you like

No, and technically it doesn't even exist in that context.

The key tells you the tonal centre of your piece, and also by definition will give you the root note of any scales you're using.

So if you're in the key of A minor any scales you're using will have a root note of A.
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#7
I shall explain to you what a pentatonic is and why they were created.

Many many years ago when the guitar, the guitar soloing and improvisation were created people would often get around the key just by soloing in its parent scale (major or minor).

But they soon found a problem. In major keys they would that the 4th nd the 7th did not work over every note in the major scale harmonically. Even though they were in the same key, certain intervals would clash. So as a quick fix for this they made a scale that did not include those to risky intervals, the pentatonic.

So basically the major pentatonic is exactly the same as the major scale, but with the 4th and 7th removed.

Suddenly they had a risk free scale that could be used over every single chord/ note in the key.


The minor pentatonic is the same story, except it is the second and the 6th that is removed.


So its actually safer to use C major pentatonic over some thing in C major than it is to use the C major scale.

The pentatonic scales are the most common scale used in improvisation on guitar and keyboard.
#8
Looking at some diagrams, it appears that the Am pentatonic scale is the same as Cmaj. So does this mean I can use the Am pent scale over a Cmaj chord progression
#9
Quote by LivinJoke84
Looking at some diagrams, it appears that the Am pentatonic scale is the same as Cmaj. So does this mean I can use the Am pent scale over a Cmaj chord progression


If you did what looked like that to you you'd actually just be playing C major pentatonic; just because something looks like one thing to you doesn't mean that's what it is. Many scales contain the same notes but they're not defined by the notes they contain, they're defined by the intervals they contain relative to the key you're playing in.
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#10
Quote by jkielq91
I shall explain to you what a pentatonic is and why they were created.

Many many years ago when the guitar, the guitar soloing and improvisation were created people would often get around the key just by soloing in its parent scale (major or minor).

But they soon found a problem. In major keys they would that the 4th nd the 7th did not work over every note in the major scale harmonically. Even though they were in the same key, certain intervals would clash. So as a quick fix for this they made a scale that did not include those to risky intervals, the pentatonic.

So basically the major pentatonic is exactly the same as the major scale, but with the 4th and 7th removed.

Suddenly they had a risk free scale that could be used over every single chord/ note in the key.


The minor pentatonic is the same story, except it is the second and the 6th that is removed.


So its actually safer to use C major pentatonic over some thing in C major than it is to use the C major scale.

The pentatonic scales are the most common scale used in improvisation on guitar and keyboard.

Yes, because pentatonic scales didn't exist before they invented the guitar.
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#11
Quote by LivinJoke84
I know this has probably been done to death but i cant find a defintive answer.

Can anyone just tell me which major, minor and pentatonic scales work over the keys A,B,C,D,E,F & G. I know obviously any major scale will work over its respective key but thats not the case with pentatonics. Im really struggling to get my head round it all and whenever i try coming up with anything it sounds shit


Google image search a Key Wheel. It shows the harmonic minor of every major key. It is a handy tool for knowing what notes you can use in a certain key.
#12
Quote by Art Vandalay
Google image search a Key Wheel. It shows the harmonic minor of every major key. It is a handy tool for knowing what notes you can use in a certain key.


On the other hand you could just try knowing your scales...
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