#1
I usually play with the area around my wrist of my right hand resting on the guitar bride. I think I just started playing this way, because I was into a lot of rock/metal and I needed to be able to mute strings ringing out. However, I can move my hand, up and down, just as long as it's still touching the bridge.

I find it harder to play with no contact with the guitar at all, but it seems almost impossible to play cleanly with no hand/wrist contact to the guitar, even on the clean channel other strings ring out, even subtlety.

So, am I anchoring and if so what needs to be done to fix it, how long might it take?

Cheers.
#2
Not anchoring is not the same as having no contact with the guitar at all, anchoring is having part of your hand fixed in such a way that it creates tension or limits your movement; you need to have contact with the guitar for muting purposes.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Not anchoring is not the same as having no contact with the guitar at all, anchoring is having part of your hand fixed in such a way that it creates tension or limits your movement; you need to have contact with the guitar for muting purposes.

no...
Achoring is the opposite. It improves your accuracy and keeps you from getting tense like you do when having a floating picking hand.
It's possible to mute and anchor by still having the palm in contact with the strings.
You must have some sort of contact with guitar to play properly, but it's not neccesary when strumming.
#4
Quote by JB95
no...
Achoring is the opposite. It improves your accuracy and keeps you from getting tense like you do when having a floating picking hand.
It's possible to mute and anchor by still having the palm in contact with the strings.
You must have some sort of contact with guitar to play properly, but it's not neccesary when strumming.


No, I didn't say anything about floating, many many many players have physical contact with the guitar without anchoring because they're not touching the thing in such a way that causes any negative effects.

Personally I wouldn't advise that people have a completely floating hand either, I think it causes unnecessary strain and stops proper muting technique from being applied. That doesn't mean that anchoring is good however because anchoring, at least by the accepted definition on this forum (and therefore the one I always use), always causes extra tension and usually hinders movement in a detrimental way.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Quote by JB95
no...
Achoring is the opposite. It improves your accuracy and keeps you from getting tense like you do when having a floating picking hand.
It's possible to mute and anchor by still having the palm in contact with the strings.
You must have some sort of contact with guitar to play properly, but it's not neccesary when strumming.

No... anchoring is the opposite. It doesn't help with flow and increases tension in your wrist. Trust me after moving to a floating hand I'm seeing a lot less tension, and the freedom is so much better, it just takes getting used to.

In terms of is that anchoring - it's anchoring if you're relying on the pressure of pushing your hand into the guitar at any point. Lightly touching a part of the guitar is fine provided you're not relying on it for support.

EDIT: After seeing Zaphod's response, just thought I'd point out that I don't have anything against resting your forearm on the body a bit, but personally I find it hinders my playing.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 10, 2011,
#6
Just nevermind, my anchoring can barely be called anchoring...
I do use my pinky and ring finger to anchor slightly, but just to not make much unneccesary wrist movement when playing fast. Still I slide the anchoring point to not feeling the need to turn my wrist in a uncomfortable position to hit the strings correctly.
Usually, the fingers are just hanging there helping a little with muting, or I just do the opposite when I'm sweeping for example.
I never press my fingers down at the body of the guitar, and I know that would just make people tense, but I think it works better for me to get some use of the fingers by doing it slighlty.
#7
However, I can move my hand, up and down, just as long as it's still touching the bridge.

I find it harder to play with no contact with the guitar at all, but it seems almost impossible to play cleanly with no hand/wrist contact to the guitar, even on the clean channel other strings ring out, even subtlety.

So, am I anchoring and if so what needs to be done to fix it, how long might it take?


Personally I'd say you sound fine, if you wanted to change to a floating hand (which does make it tricky to mute, as you say) it'd probably take about 6 months to go from start to completely comfortable.

Just make sure you don't press into the guitar - a lot of people do that unconsciously when playing fast and it's a totally pointless use of effort!
#8
Quote by Freepower
Personally I'd say you sound fine, if you wanted to change to a floating hand (which does make it tricky to mute, as you say) it'd probably take about 6 months to go from start to completely comfortable.

Just make sure you don't press into the guitar - a lot of people do that unconsciously when playing fast and it's a totally pointless use of effort!


Took me an hour before I noticed the benefit and about a week or 2 before I was completely comfortable with it (initially I got quite a bit of shoulder pain). Depends on the person I guess. The kicker for me was playing the low E string - didn't realise it until I tried playing with a floating hand but I always used to press the thumb on my picking hand into the body of the guitar!
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 11, 2011,
#9
For lead playing, I tend to put my little finger down on the guitar, but it doesn't seem to affect my playing. Rhythm wise, which is what I play mostly, I don't touch the guitar at all with my right hand. Unless I'm palm muting.
#10
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
For lead playing, I tend to put my little finger down on the guitar, but it doesn't seem to affect my playing. Rhythm wise, which is what I play mostly, I don't touch the guitar at all with my right hand. Unless I'm palm muting.

Your avatar is always so distracting... which thread is this again?
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
#11
I'm fairly sure resting your wrist on the bridge while playing is perfectly normal, it helps your stability when playing and muting the strings. Keeping the resting (non-picking) fingers on your picking hand bound to the body or another part of the guitar while playing, however, is generally NOT a good practice as it promotes tension in your wrist and arm.
PRS SE Custom 22
Peavey Vypyr 30


"When you look into the eyes of a man grown old,
wonder about the secrets gone untold.

When you look into the eyes of a young child,
marvel at the innocence running wild."
#12
Quote by Scopic
I'm fairly sure resting your wrist on the bridge while playing is perfectly normal, it helps your stability when playing and muting the strings. Keeping the resting (non-picking) fingers on your picking hand bound to the body or another part of the guitar while playing, however, is generally NOT a good practice as it promotes tension in your wrist and arm.


Resting my hand on the bridge of my Ibanez (Edge Pro trem unit) makes everything sharp :P Well, depending on the amount of pressure you apply.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 11, 2011,
#13
Quote by llBlackenedll
Took me an hour before I noticed the benefit and about a week or 2 before I was completely comfortable with it (initially I got quite a bit of shoulder pain). Depends on the person I guess. The kicker for me was playing the low E string - didn't realise it until I tried playing with a floating hand but I always used to press the thumb on my picking hand into the body of the guitar!


yeah me too, I stopped anchoring because I was struggling to hit the higher strings, took about three days before I was able to play with the same speed and comfort.