#1
What are some chord patterns that you can use to make certain types of chords beside Power Chords. Are there any Major, Minor, Diminshed, Augmented Chord patterns? I know theory but I want to be able to construct chords on the go for jamming on the spot.

The only move-able ones I know are the Hendrix style chord pattern and Steve Vai variation on the Hendrix move-able chord pattern
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#2
the minor scale from A up to next octave= A minor, Bdim, Cmaj, Dmin, Emin, Fmaj, Gmaj, Amin... etc.
Basically it's min,dim,maj,min,min,maj.maj over again.
That's what you should learn at first, but later on you can check out other chords you can use while staying in the same key.
#3
I'm not sure about the Hendrix and Via chord patterns, I didn't know there was such a thing.

Try finding the chords in the Key of C Major - Look up "harmonized major scale in the key of C" and play with those chords together, mix and match and use your ears, as I am assuming you dont know diatonic theory and harmony or much theory at all. See if you can find which chords want to move and resolve on C the most (cadences).

Then, lay down a backing trach of some of these chords, and play a C Major scale over it and then begin to experiment and improvise in small bits over that progression. A simple 4 track program like Audacity can provide a rudimentary backing track creation system for most people.

Good luck!

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Nov 11, 2011,
#4
Quote by Sean0913
I'm not sure about the Hendrix and Via chord patterns, I didn't know there was such a thing.

Try finding the chords in the Key of C Major - Look up "harmonized major scale in the key of C" and play with those chords together, mix and match and use your ears, as I am assuming you dont know diatonic theory and harmony or much theory at all. See if you can find which chords want to move and resolve on C the most (cadences).

Then, lay down a backing trach of some of these chords, and play a C Major scale over it and then begin to experiment and improvise in small bits over that progression. A simple 4 track program like Audacity can provide a rudimentary backing track creation system for most people.

Good luck!

Best,

Sean


Yeah i just want a pattern on the fretboard with the Root, 3rd, 5th and 7th thats move-able. I should of clarified. I toke 2 years of Music Theory so I know those, I just wanted a quick way to play chords on the fretboard in a jam without major thinking.

Quote by JB95
the minor scale from A up to next octave= A minor, Bdim, Cmaj, Dmin, Emin, Fmaj, Gmaj, Amin... etc.
Basically it's min,dim,maj,min,min,maj.maj over again.
That's what you should learn at first, but later on you can check out other chords you can use while staying in the same key.


Again I know my theory, I should of clarified. I just wanted a quick way to make chords on the fretboard with patterns
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Last edited by Xter at Nov 11, 2011,
#5
The best way would be to know the notes on the neck and know then very well, especially on the 6th and 5th strings.

Do you know open position chords?

Do you know barre chords?

Do you understand the CAGED theory system

Do you know the notes on the neck where you can find a root note anywhere on the guitar in "real-time"?

Can you recite any chord formula pattern in "real time" by instantly being able to call out the notes of the chord?

As for the Hendrix thing, you just gave me a Major 7th chord formula. The only song that comes to mind that Hendrix uses that chord on is May This Be Love.

Even if it was other 7ths like b7, that's not endemic to Hendrix, as say a 7#9 chord would be, so I'm still not sure what you mean by his "progressions" unless you mean his rhythm "style" a la Little Wing with double stops and hammer ons.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Nov 11, 2011,
#6
Quote by Sean0913
The best way would be to know the notes on the neck and know then very well, especially on the 6th and 5th strings.

Do you know open position chords?

Do you know barre chords?

Do you understand the CAGED theory system

Do you know the notes on the neck where you can find a root note anywhere on the guitar in "real-time"?

Can you recite any chord formula pattern in "real time" by instantly being able to call out the notes of the chord?

As for the Hendrix thing, you just gave me a Major 7th chord formula. The only song that comes to mind that Hendrix uses that chord on is May This Be Love.

Even if it was other 7ths like b7, that's not endemic to Hendrix, as say a 7#9 chord would be, so I'm still not sure what you mean by his "progressions" unless you mean his rhythm "style" a la Little Wing with double stops and hammer ons.

Best,

Sean


Yes I do know open position chords.

Yes I know Barre-chords.

Yes I understand the CAGED system but i don't particulary enjoy using it.

Unforunately, I cannot identify all the notes on the fretboard in real time, only on both the E strings, the A string, and the D string.

Again no, only Major, Minor, Diminished, and Augmented triads in real-time.

And im sorry, I was looking for a chord pattern for that example. Hendrix move-able pattern is a 7#9 chord. Like E7#9 in purple haze.

E:---------
A:----7----
D:----6----
G:----7----
B:----8----
E:---------

The Steve Vai move-able chord style is the same but inverted

E:--------
A:---6----
D:---5----
G:---7----
B:---8----
E:--------
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
Epiphone Black Beauty
Epiphone AJ
Marshall JCM900 4201
Blackheart Little Giant
MXR Dist. +
MXR Six Band EQ
MXR Phase 90
#7
what you are calling a movable chord pattern is nothing more than a chord shape... you can move any chord shape, especially the barred ones...

also, I would learn to read and write tablature if I were you... yours is upside down... lol
#8
You say you know barre chords - how are they not exactly what you're looking for?
#9
Quote by mrkeka
what you are calling a movable chord pattern is nothing more than a chord shape... you can move any chord shape, especially the barred ones...

also, I would learn to read and write tablature if I were you... yours is upside down... lol


Thank you, and I don't use tabs a lot at all. I read sheet music 99.9% of the time anymore.

Quote by HotspurJr
You say you know barre chords - how are they not exactly what you're looking for?


Because I want more "exciting" chord styles then that. Like the chords used in the intro to "Diary of a Madman". A lot of guitarists use Barre Chords. I want to make my general sound more unique and something if I jammed with someone they are surprised by the voicing. So far no one has really provided me with any chord patterns or "shapes" as the above user to you said. I wouldn't mind some inverted chord patterns that are major/minor, because thats what i want is a move-able chord pattern then could be a Amaj7 in 2nd inversion but I move it up two frets and its Bmaj7 in 2nd inversion. Understand?
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
Epiphone Black Beauty
Epiphone AJ
Marshall JCM900 4201
Blackheart Little Giant
MXR Dist. +
MXR Six Band EQ
MXR Phase 90
Last edited by Xter at Nov 11, 2011,
#10
In this thread I presented a method for creating inversions and voicing's of the four seventh type chords. There are many, but this (I hope) will help you out, if you understand chord construction you'll be able to make sense of it.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1475400

Post 8 and 16 onwards.

Edit: You know what, I'll just paste it in here...

To experiment with inversions and voicings, you can do this. In this example I've chosen the 4 middle strings. But you should find the voicings on the other two string sets as well.

What I've done is taken a root position chord, then played it with the 3rd in the bass, followed by the 5th and then the 7th.

Use these shapes as a template, and adjust the notes accordingly to accommodate the three remaining chord types, which are: m7, 7, m7b5.

I don't want to tab all the shapes out for you, as I think it's important for the person to find the notes/intervals themselves.

So this should give you plenty of home work. In total, you should be able to come up with 48 different voicings.

4 chord types, in 4 position, on 3 different string sets (as mentioned in the 1st para).
------------
-5-8-12-13
-4-5-9--12
-5-9-10-14
-3-7-10-14
------------

Here's Cm7 as an example.

------------
-4-8-11-13
-3-5-8--12
-5-8-10-13
-3-6-10-13
-----------

Unless your name's Allan Holdsworth, not many people would probably go for the 2nd voicing!

A dom7 chord this time.

-------------
-3-6-8--12
-4-7-10-12
-3-5-9--12
-------------
-3-7-10-13
Last edited by mdc at Nov 11, 2011,
#12
Quote by Xter
I wouldn't mind some inverted chord patterns that are major/minor, because thats what i want is a move-able chord pattern then could be a Amaj7 in 2nd inversion but I move it up two frets and its Bmaj7 in 2nd inversion. Understand?

The above stuff will be suited to this.
Because I want more "exciting" chord styles then that. Like the chords used in the intro to "Diary of a Madman". A lot of guitarists use Barre Chords. I want to make my general sound more unique and something if I jammed with someone they are surprised by the voicing. So far no one has really provided me with any chord patterns or "shapes" as the above user to you said.

Looking at that song in particular, the chords are changing under a static tonic note. Do you know about Pitch Axis or Modal Interchange? In this case, Pitch Axis is more appropriate.

To create chords like in that song, you need learn how to build chords from the simplest scales through to more exotic scales like H-W Diminished, Whole Tone and so forth.

Fyi, the first 4 chords in that song intro are built from the following scales:

A Lydian, A Whole Tone, A Dominant Diminished, A Whole Half Diminished - and then resolves to Aadd9, the A Major Scale.

Of course, some scales do overlap and have common intervals.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 12, 2011,
#13
Quote by Xter

Because I want more "exciting" chord styles then that. Like the chords used in the intro to "Diary of a Madman". A lot of guitarists use Barre Chords. I want to make my general sound more unique and something if I jammed with someone they are surprised by the voicing. So far no one has really provided me with any chord patterns or "shapes" as the above user to you said. I wouldn't mind some inverted chord patterns that are major/minor, because thats what i want is a move-able chord pattern then could be a Amaj7 in 2nd inversion but I move it up two frets and its Bmaj7 in 2nd inversion. Understand?


I mean this in the nicest possible way, but if you know theory you should be able to create those yourself, right?

I mean, just off the top of my head the 002120 pattern is exactly what you're asking for, and it's a tricky (but doable with practice) barre. (Second inversions are really easy to do with a-shape bar chords, because all you have to do is extend the barre to the low e-string on an a-shape barre).