#1
Okay, so I've been playing bass for about 3 years now, and I'm in the school jazz band. Not being a cocky jackass or anything, but the bands really pretty good, we play SAmmy Nestico/Count Basie, Gordon Goodwin and John LaBarbera stuff pretty well. So, as you could guess, my director's standards are pretty high. So all that pretty much leads to:

I'm using a Squire J-Bass and an Acoustic B200 Combo, and I'm having a frickin hard time being heard through a 15-piece wind section without getting a bad sound. If I could, I'd get rid of the Squire and buy a Music Man or a good Ibanez, but being the jobless son of a teacher and a non-profit tv producer, "extra" money's tighter than Kim Kardashian's ass around here. So, right now I'm stuck with I got.

I know that the person sepplaying the bass is the one responsible for most of the tone, and I think I'm holdin up my end pretty well, but you guys how squires are. On the bass, I usually have the neck pickup (in volume percentages, cuz I don't know how those knobs work) at 80-85% and the bridge varying between 65 and 50%. On the amp, i have (during class):
Gain: 5-6
Volume: 10
Frequency Notch: either 7ish or 10, I experiment sometimes.
63Hz: 2
150: 2-3
350: 5-6.5
800: 5-7
2K: 4
5K: 4.5

This is best sound I've been able to get with enough volume to be noticeable, but it's still either too boomy and rock-esque and lacking that nice upright kind of sound or not loud enough to be heard by the whole band.

So, if any of you guys have experience with this kind of thing and have any EQ/technique tips or cheap remedies that involve new equipment, my firstborn son is yours.

Thanks, guys.
#2
Roll up your low mids and buy some flat/half/tape wounds.

Edit: If you want to achieve a thumpy upright sound.
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding
#3
If you're being drowned out at 200 watts, then I'm afraid an EQ adjustment won't do it. You're going to need either a more powerful amplifier or at least another cabinet. I don't know if the B200 will run another cabinet; I haven't looked at the back of mine in a while.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
The B200 has a 1/4" output jack for an additional cabinet. I often see used Acoustic B115 cabinets in the $125-$150 price range. Adding one of those is probably the cheapest and most effective way to increase your volume/headroom. Just make sure you use a speaker cable, not an instrument cable, to connect the extra cab.
#5
Alright, thanks, guys. =)

Yeah, I'll find some not-round-wounds and I'll look for another cheap cab. I hate that there's not much else to do, though. =/

Thanks.
#6
If the B200 has an extra speaker jack it probably means you are currently running at 125-150w at 8ohm. Another speaker will put you at 4ohm and the whole 200w. This is probably the best solution. I'd look at your manual and see what it says about the ohms though because if you're already at 4ohms and 200w, you might need more power. I don't think so, however. I would try some eq-ing. Mids help you to be heard in band situations. Boost these and keep experimenting. Oh, and why not have your bass volume at %100? This will give you significantly more power.
#7
What everyone said, that head probably takes a 4 ohm load, and your using an 8. but you could already have a 4 ohm cab. Best bet, read over a B200 manual, and read the specifics if any on the back of your cab, if there aren't any or a brand name (like on mine) crack it open and read the speaker. I have always used 200 watt amps to great effect, but I played with a drummer and guitarist, not a full woodwind band.

Best bet first is tone, get some flat wound strings, they are mellow, not as mellow as tape, but they last forever esp. with the tone you wish to achieve. Also look online for tutorials on how to make a foam mute for your bridge, gives a more staccato thump like an upright.

Extra options, if indeed you are running that bass head at half power, look into used cabs that are 200+ watts and match your needed ohm (8 + 8 = 4 etc.) If you are running your head at 200 watts you may be at your heads potential and over driving the signal. In that case you need to sell the head/trade it or hook up to a PA or something and get more headroom. Lastly, maybe as a science project, or with some purchased pre made parts, make a piezo and active preamp circuit, for woody upright tones.

It may be a squier, but it is a Jazz Bass dial it in, and it'll do the rest. Fenders are excellent in their ability to be morphed to fit you.

Edit: Also just to make you a better all around musician, when you do change your strings, take the neck off, the bridge off, and the pickguard and lift up the control plate. If you never have before, they are usually caked with sawdust and factory grime, and this also does two things, lessens your fear of working with the instrument, and lets you see if anything is wrong or not up to par. Squiers, even real fenders make mistakes or cut corners on batches and use say 500k pots and different caps on basses and guitars. A standard Jazz or P has 250k pots and a .47 cap in the tone you might not have that. Also never hurts to foil, and ground your bass properly, especially a single coil jazz bass.
Last edited by askrere at Nov 13, 2011,
#8
Excellent, thanks, I'll definitely look into all of that.

I love all the knowledge and will to share it here. It's very much appreciated. =)
#9
Quote by glennick
Oh, and why not have your bass volume at %100? This will give you significantly more power.


I don't know about the TS but I always found when I owned a jazz bass the neck soloed or the bridge soloed was louder than them both maxed, and relaxing them a smidge when both on was best for that.

I read somewhere there was a reason for that perceived volume drop, and some resistor or other wiring thing could correctly adjust and boost the two. Reminds me, consider wiring your bass for series wiring, big bassy volume boost.

Your welcome for all the advice, when someone is truly interested it's great to share it all. I am seldom with a lot of cash (jobless student), and my bass gear is nearly all under $70, only one of my heads and a few basses cost over $100. I watch my local Craigslist like a fiend, and I've gotten lots of free, cheap or not working things (and fixed them) for very little money and shrewd haggling. I think budget playing really teaches you how to be a self reliant musician, instead of tossing things to the local tech, or buying and replacing, I figure out and research constantly and come up with my own designs and wiring ideas a lot, and my Dad teaches me and helps make them come to life. Right now, I'm creating custom for me basses from a squier affinity P and a Squier affinity Bronco, two of the most knocked about basses by the Fender corp. Also I make my money by buying up cheap music gear deals and reselling them, it's slower, but less time consuming than a real job and comes out to equal pay if I worked an hourly job a few days a week.
#10
Quote by askrere
I don't know about the TS but I always found when I owned a jazz bass the neck soloed or the bridge soloed was louder than them both maxed, and relaxing them a smidge when both on was best for that.

I read somewhere there was a reason for that perceived volume drop, and some resistor or other wiring thing could correctly adjust and boost the two. Reminds me, consider wiring your bass for series wiring, big bassy volume boost.

Your welcome for all the advice, when someone is truly interested it's great to share it all. I am seldom with a lot of cash (jobless student), and my bass gear is nearly all under $70, only one of my heads and a few basses cost over $100. I watch my local Craigslist like a fiend, and I've gotten lots of free, cheap or not working things (and fixed them) for very little money and shrewd haggling. I think budget playing really teaches you how to be a self reliant musician, instead of tossing things to the local tech, or buying and replacing, I figure out and research constantly and come up with my own designs and wiring ideas a lot, and my Dad teaches me and helps make them come to life. Right now, I'm creating custom for me basses from a squier affinity P and a Squier affinity Bronco, two of the most knocked about basses by the Fender corp. Also I make my money by buying up cheap music gear deals and reselling them, it's slower, but less time consuming than a real job and comes out to equal pay if I worked an hourly job a few days a week.

you are awsome man! thats actually a inspration