#1
So it occured to me, what if I practice chromatic scales or whatever without using my thumb to support my hand on the neck of the guitar, and focus on getting the fingers in the right places. I feel like this will increase their strength and accuracy, but it's something I haven't heard of before. Would this be a kind of incorrect practice? I don't want to start doing this if it's gonna mess things up for me. When I play without a thumb, then with it, I feel like I'm improving

Thoughts?
#2
Practice the physical motions you are going to use to play, there's nothing more efficient than just doing what you want to do but slower...
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#3
If you can play a guitar without feeling pain, you don't need more strength. You need coordination and that can't be learned playing it unnaturally. Your thumb is there for a reason; to support the neck and make it much more comfortable to play.
There's a good chance that what I've written above is useless and if you take any of the advice it's your own fault.
#4
Quote by hairypineapple
When I play without a thumb, then with it, I feel like I'm improving

Thoughts?

Actually, it feels like that might just be because you suck when you play without your thumb. Of course it feels like you're improving, compared to playing thumbless.
REGGIE
#6
It will be very hard to keep the neck still with out having your thumb there, and it will also be harder to actually press the strings down.

If you push a box it will move away from you, but if you push it when its against a wall it wont move. Think of your neck like the box, your thumb as the wall and your fretting as the push motion.

But you could always try these idea out. You dont need our permission. =)

You'll soon find out if it works or not.
#7
Quote by jkielq91
It will be very hard to keep the neck still with out having your thumb there, and it will also be harder to actually press the strings down.

If you push a box it will move away from you, but if you push it when its against a wall it wont move. Think of your neck like the box, your thumb as the wall and your fretting as the push motion.

But you could always try these idea out. You dont need our permission. =)

You'll soon find out if it works or not.

Yeah, this. I can play just fine without my thumb touching the neck (yeah I've tried this before for some dumbass reason) but it's just a bit awkward as the neck is less sturdy, and also it's just completely pointless.
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#8
Actually, I recommend giving this a go every so often (certainly don't do it every practise). It helps people to get used to the proper way of fretting, with the application of strength coming from the fingers and the weight of the arm, as opposed to squeezing between thumb and finger. The thumb is only there to provide stability and to give you a constant reference point.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#9
Quote by Aleksi
Actually, I recommend giving this a go every so often (certainly don't do it every practise). It helps people to get used to the proper way of fretting, with the application of strength coming from the fingers and the weight of the arm, as opposed to squeezing between thumb and finger. The thumb is only there to provide stability and to give you a constant reference point.


I suppose you could lightly hold the neck with your pick hand and play legato.