#1
Well,I feel it may soon be time for a really nice quality bass,and I've long been considering a rickenbacker.
The other night I watched the Lemmy movie (who I was named after actually) and well,lets just say,GAS was had.
I'm 17,and I'm from Australia,although I would be buying from America and getting it shipped.Things are looking pretty promising for my band,and I'm likely to study music at university,so I think i can justify dropping the amount if cash on it.If I start saving now,I could probably afford it in about a year or so.
I predominantly play stoner rock,and most of my favourite bassists can be seen sporting a rickenbacker.I play with the fret board picking technique (youtube scott reeder videos to see what I'm talking about), through lots of fuzz and distortion into a big old tube head.
At the moment,I have a Peavey t-40,which I really do like,but I am feeling like I'm growing out if it. I really like the sound I get from the big neck humbucker,heavy body weight and big bridge.However the thing is ridiculously heavy,and you really need to dig at it to get a good sound out of it.This can be hard to do night after night,particularly with our energetic stage presence.Having played some other high end basses,they're just much more buttery and easy to play as opposed to mine.
I have played one once,but they are not too common around here,so playing one means 2 hours on public transport,without a garuntee that the music shops will even have one in,plus another 2 hours back.

TL;DR
I'm young stoner rock bassist,and I'm looking at a rickenbacker for my music career and uni.

Now the questions:
Is it worth it?
Is it worth tracking down a nice vintage one? (I love 70's stuff!)
Is there much of difference between the old toaster neck humbucker and its replacement,which I believe is a single coil?
I really am a fan of the humbuckers you see.
Any other general responses appreciated!
thanks.
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#2
Rickenbackers are sexy.
I think you'll have it for pretty much forever if you get one.
I really want one as well, due to both Scott Reeder and Al Cisneros, which I'm sure you know of from Sleep and Om fame. If not, better check this out right now. Such a phat tone. (Although a lot of it comes from the Green amps and stuff.

I'd say it's a worthy long term investment.
Follow the smoke toward the riff filled land
brutal
#3
The Rick is a remarkably well-made bass with a sound all its own. You really need to want the Rickenbacker sound to go for one, as it isn't going to sound like a Fender Precision, Jazz, or just about anything else you can think of.

You are probably better off with the newer 4003 model than with the old 4001 model. The 4001 was fitted with softer frets for use with the old flatwound / tapewound strings, and those older basses had a habit of needing a refret after only a few months of continuous use of roundwound strings. As for the sound of the old vs. the new, the 4001 had a capacitor wired to the bridge pickup that cut the low end out of that pickup. The 4003 does not have it. Some 4003 models were shipped with the capacitor in the case so you could wire it in if you desired. I don't know if they still include it.

The original pickups used tungsten magnets. The new ones use ceramic magnets.

The 4003 can do all of the tones of the 4001; particularly if you wire in that capacitor. If you do, you might want to wire it to a toggle switch so you can turn it on and off.

As already stated, a Rick is a bass for life (for most people, anyway). If that is the sound you are going for, you won't be satisfied with anything else.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
Thanks for the quick responses guys.Unfortunantely,this is not the news my wallet wanted to hear,especially with Black Sabbath announcing a world tour!

valdean: the degree of my Scott Reeder/Al Cisneros fanboyism is off the scale. If your interested,send me a private message I'll show you some of my bands music. Heavy Sleep/Kyuss influences in terms of bass.

Fatalgear 41: Thanks for that insight,that's the kind of information I was after.I tend to hit the strings pretty hard,so cheers for the heads up on the fret issue.

The more information the better,particularly any opinions on the neck pick-up.
Cheers.
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#5
Quote by FatalGear41
As for the sound of the old vs. the new, the 4001 had a capacitor wired to the bridge pickup that cut the low end out of that pickup. The 4003 does not have it. Some 4003 models were shipped with the capacitor in the case so you could wire it in if you desired. I don't know if they still include it.

IIRC all 4003's built in 2006 or later have a push/pull pot on one of the tone controls, pushed down is the regular 4003 tone, and pulling up engages the capacitor. They call it the "vintage tone control" or something like that.

I agree with FatalGear, go for a 4003 if you're going to go for a Rick. It can do everything the 4001 can do, and old 4001's can fetch stupid high prices. If you go used you can get much better prices on a 4003 with less wear and tear.
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Spector and Markbass
#6
Slightly relevant: I asked Scott Reeder about his choice of basses a while back:

When I switched from drums to bass, I bought a Rickenbacker copy from our leaving bassist, so when I finally got a better bass, it was a real Rickenbacker. I was beating the hell out of the Ricky on the road, busting pickups, and it sounded a lot different every time I replaced the pick up. When Kyuss went into the studio for the last record, it really sounded pretty bad, and our engineer, Joe Barresi, knew the artist rep at Ibanez and had a few things dropped off. They were easy to play and sounded way better than the ailing Rickenbacker, so I just went with it.


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1468168
#7
Cheers Tostitos,I'll read up on that
smb,thanks for showing me that interview,it was quite good actually.
I did try out an atk a while ago,and whilst it felt nice,and quite similiar to the peavey,it sounded god awful with a whole lot of fuzz on it!
I'll keep the wear out factor in mind
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#8
I think it's been said, if you want one, and have the money, your probably going to get one.

I'd love a 4003 in turquoise, I'd feel real nervous leaving it in a university student dorm though. I think the ATK's active preamp might have made the fuzz nasty.
#9
Just be careful if someone's selling a midnight blue one for really cheap prices. There was a big blow-out sale on MF and most of the MB basses had a nasty bleeding issue.

As for tracking down an oldie, Ric's are built to survive nuclear war, so it's worth a shot. Just know, when it comes to maintenance...they're a pretty unique beast compared to your usual stuff. In addition, the pick-up guard is ridiculously hard to get off.
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