#1
I'm recording my own solo EP thing, and I've got two options, I could go with the inexpensive way of recording it myself. I've got a god set-up. Piano, midi contoller, electronic drumset that plugs rit in so no airy feedback stuff, good mic, decked out with popfilte and everything. I'v got a plug in for guitar bassand anythi yu can plug in as well with an effects processor in that so I've gt basically a full set-up. It get's super highquality stuff. The only thing I'm iffy about is the drums. They don't strike me as powrful as like stuff in prorecordings. maybe it's just all the eq stuff?

whatI'm wondering is should I go with my homesetup and go inexpensive or go pro and everything and pay a couple thousand?
#2
record a track or 2 and see if you are content with the quality. test it out on some friends see what they think and go from there.
#3
If you're planning on attempting to sell this EP or use it for any kind of professional purpose, your best bet would be to get it done at a proper studio.

Recording yourself is a good hobby to have, but it takes a lot of time and practice and a home setup will never provide the same quality as a professional setup.

If you have a couple of thousand to spend on it, that's more than enough to get a studio for a couple of days to record your EP and still have enough left over to buy recording kit to start yourself off with a home setup which you could use for recording future ideas.
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#4
One thing I was told about recording is exactly what you're getting at:

It's not too hard to record guitars, basses, and keyboards at home.

But drums? You need the right gear, and you need to know how to use it. If you don't, it shows.

I've heard the advice given that if you only have a limited amount of funds, get studio time to record your drum tracks and do the rest on your own. Maybe someone with more experience than me can comment if they think that's doable (I'm not recording expert) but it sounds to me like your gut is telling you that you're not getting the drum sounds you want at home.

And if so, that's your answer.
#5
I was thinking of getting a guitar rack set up and plugging that into my computer, do you think that would be able to take care of the guitar parts technology wise? (obviously I can't mix as well as a professional)

I mean all I needs a sound specific sound which I will choose when getting the preamp-poweramp, and adjust the settings to how I think it should be and plugging it straight into the computer. Other than that whats there to it really?
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Nov 15, 2011,
#6
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
I was thinking of getting a guitar rack set up and plugging that into my computer, do you think that would be able to take care of the guitar parts technology wise? (obviously I can't mix as well as a professional)

I mean all I needs a sound specific sound which I will choose when getting the preamp-poweramp, and adjust the settings to how I think it should be and plugging it straight into the computer. Other than that whats there to it really?

If you want to record to your computer, you'll need a proper interface. Just plugging directly to your PC will leave you reliant on the PC's soundcard which usually isn't good enough to provide decent quality recordings. The interface then replaces your PC's soundcard as well as providing the connections which you'd plug guitars, mics etc into.

The other alternative for home recording is to get a multitracker. This provides a good all in one solution which is usually easier to get to grips with than recording software, however if you are expecting to use lots of VSTs and plugins then you need to go the software route.

As for the question "whats there to it really?", the answer is "a lot". Learning to record is similar to learning a whole new instrument. Even if you get the sound you want from your amp, translating that to your recording takes a lot of practice and time, and creating a final mix and mastering a number of songs so they have a similar feel to create a whole album of material that doesn't sound disjointed is another skill again.

I recommend checking out the numerous threads in the Recordings forum to find out more about the options and skills required.
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#7
If you have to ask and want this done quickly within the next month or two, just go have someone do it for you. Your going to waste so much time and more than likely get a very subpar sound, whether you can hear it yourself or not. Learning the art of recording isn't just something you do in a few weeks. It takes years of learning.

It's also in bad taste to record yourself, you have a bias that you can't get rid of.
#8
Quote by scguitarking927
If you have to ask and want this done quickly within the next month or two, just go have someone do it for you. Your going to waste so much time and more than likely get a very subpar sound, whether you can hear it yourself or not. Learning the art of recording isn't just something you do in a few weeks. It takes years of learning.

It's also in bad taste to record yourself, you have a bias that you can't get rid of.

I agree with most of this, but not the bad taste part.

Yes, if you're recording yourself you're more likely to hear what you want to hear rather than what is actually there, but it's certainly not in bad taste to record yourself. I do it all the time, I enjoy it & find it adds extra motivation for me to keep trying to improve my playing. I'm not claiming to be recording an album though.

Definitely agree that the answer to this thread is that the guy needs to get himself some studio time to record his album. If he wants to start recording himself, great, but that's not going to give him the results he'll need for his album.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#9
Quote by GaryBillington
I agree with most of this, but not the bad taste part.

Yes, if you're recording yourself you're more likely to hear what you want to hear rather than what is actually there, but it's certainly not in bad taste to record yourself. I do it all the time, I enjoy it & find it adds extra motivation for me to keep trying to improve my playing. I'm not claiming to be recording an album though.

Definitely agree that the answer to this thread is that the guy needs to get himself some studio time to record his album. If he wants to start recording himself, great, but that's not going to give him the results he'll need for his album.


I say that because "most" people can't sit down and objectively mix a song, their particular instrument 9/10 times is going to stick out like a sore thumb in a mix. You can record yourself, but it's next to impossible to get an unbiased mix. Much better idea if your looking to distribute or actually sell the songs to let someone else do it.

I mean I have a full studio, I record myself on occasion too, and it's fine and dandy for doing demos and such. Its just best not to play the role of artist, producer, and engineer, if you can help it.

It's the same basic principle of why if you do the mixing, you let someone else master it. Fresh ears and an unbiased product.
Last edited by scguitarking927 at Nov 15, 2011,