#1
My grandpa used to be a carpenter, and he said they occasionally used boiled linseed oil to finish furniture.
I'm deciding which finish to use on the body, when I'm done building. I might go with linseed, but not sure which solvent to use. Is gasoline an option? Perhaps acetone? Does anything else need to be added to the oil besides the solvent?
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#2
For cleaning the body, Naptha appears to be the luthiers choice generally. Though I don't think you mix it with the finishing oil

What type of wood is it?
#3
Quote by Phoenix V
For cleaning the body, Naptha appears to be the luthiers choice generally. Though I don't think you mix it with the finishing oil

What type of wood is it?

Cleaning the body? As a part of the finishing procedure, or something? I was more thinking of an alternative to lacquer. If I understood right, several layers of drying oil mixed with a solvent should be good. Or how exactly did you imagine finishing the body with oils?
Isn't naphtha a mixture or different peroleum derrivates? Or is that another name for one of them? Which solvents would do damage to the wood?
The wood is European Beech.
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#4
I'd recommend using boiled linseed oil vs regular if you're set on using it. They used to use linseed oil for everything (wooden farm equipment, barn sides, furniture, etc). The purpose of cutting the oil with solvents allows it to penetrate the wood quicker. You may like Tru Oil or Tung Oil better than linseed.

By "cleaning the body" he meant removing all the tiny dust and wood particles from the surface before you actually start applying the finish. It's a standard across all of woodworking.
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#6
Quote by Guodlca
Is gasoline an option?

Hell, no! Don't use gasoline for anything but fuelling an engine. Anyone who advocates its use for anything else is an idiot who deserves to receive a Darwin award.
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#7
you'd be far better off with something like tru, tung or danish oil. many people on here have built guitars and finished with these oils.

and people use nahptha just to clean off the body of any oily residue from hands and other shit thats touched the wood. means its properly clean.
#8
Yeah naptha for preparing the wood prior to the finish. do NOT use gasoline during any part of the build. Like others have suggested Tung oil is a preferred finishing oil that seals the grain.Linseed is ok for ornamental furniture maybe because it normally will not go through the constant handling, sweat and hand grime a guitar is exposed to. I dont recommend linseed.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Nov 16, 2011,
#9
Quote by Phoenix V
Yeah naptha for preparing the wood prior to the finish. do NOT use gasoline during any part of the build.

I see. But, isn't naphtha in fact a mixture of gasoline and longer chain hydrocarbons? So, lighter fluid would be good?
Quote by Doonan
you'd be far better off with something like tru, tung or danish oil. many people on here have built guitars and finished with these oils.

and people use nahptha just to clean off the body of any oily residue from hands and other shit thats touched the wood. means its properly clean.

Danish oil is made of tung oil. What does it make it different from raw tung oil? Only that it's thinned with a solvent? So, if I buy tung oil and thin it with naphtha, I get a varnish?
And Tru oil is polymerised linseed oil. Isn't boiling actualy polymerising it?

You all mentioned cleaning the surface with naphtha. Does that need to be done only before the first layer, or before each layer?

Also, when I apply layers, should I use steel wool or sand paper before each extra layer, or nothing at all? I'm used to lacquer, I'm not sure how thick each layer is.
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#10
No, raw tung oil doesnt have a drying agent in it. It will never fully cure.
And tru oil is much different than boiled linseed oil. Boiled linseed oil doesnt build up a thickness, only soaks in.

You only clean the surface before the first coat. or else you will strip back or melt the coats...
#11
You realize gasoline has other chemicals added into these days, right? Such as detergents, anti-gelling agents for winter blend, and dye? I wouldn't want any of those on my guitar body (maybe the dye, but I doubt I'd want it to be the color of gas) directly underneath a finish I strived to perfect. Is "strived" even a word?

-Lighter fluid is naphtha.
-If you use Tung Oil I recommend cutting it with an alcohol, you can finish with raw Tung but it takes longer to dry and doesn't penetrate as well.
-Tru Oil is a mixture of oils that's primarily linseed. Linseed by itself isn't really a finish to be honest, but it does look pretty.

It sounds like you need to do some reading up on how to do finishwork, we're not here to hold your hand through every little detail. You can find these answers through Google or woodworking forums instead of us regurgitating it to you.
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SVK ELP-C500 Custom

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[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#12
Quote by Flux'D
You realize gasoline has other chemicals added into these days, right? Such as detergents, anti-gelling agents for winter blend, and dye? I wouldn't want any of those on my guitar body (maybe the dye, but I doubt I'd want it to be the color of gas) directly underneath a finish I strived to perfect. Is "strived" even a word?

-Lighter fluid is naphtha.
-If you use Tung Oil I recommend cutting it with an alcohol, you can finish with raw Tung but it takes longer to dry and doesn't penetrate as well.
-Tru Oil is a mixture of oils that's primarily linseed. Linseed by itself isn't really a finish to be honest, but it does look pretty.

It sounds like you need to do some reading up on how to do finishwork, we're not here to hold your hand through every little detail. You can find these answers through Google or woodworking forums instead of us regurgitating it to you.

Thanks for the information.
True, I do have to do reading, I've never worked with oils before. Noone forced you to reply, though. I thought it's best to get information first hand from people with experience and I don't want to annoy anybody with it
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#13
Quote by Vulcan
Hell, no! Don't use gasoline for anything but fuelling an engine. Anyone who advocates its use for anything else is an idiot who deserves to receive a Darwin award.


I used gasoline numerous times to clean my hands after using some materials such as poxy
#14
Quote by Guodlca
I see. But, isn't naphtha in fact a mixture of gasoline and longer chain hydrocarbons? So, lighter fluid would be good?

Danish oil is made of tung oil. What does it make it different from raw tung oil? Only that it's thinned with a solvent? So, if I buy tung oil and thin it with naphtha, I get a varnish?
And Tru oil is polymerised linseed oil. Isn't boiling actualy polymerising it?

You all mentioned cleaning the surface with naphtha. Does that need to be done only before the first layer, or before each layer?

Also, when I apply layers, should I use steel wool or sand paper before each extra layer, or nothing at all? I'm used to lacquer, I'm not sure how thick each layer is.


Naptha is lighter fliud and is safe to use as a prep and cleaning agent on bare wood. Stop with this gasoline thing. You don't use gasoline.

Naptha can be used as a thinning agent for the Tung Oil. As a previous poster said, mineral spirits or denatured alcohol is good also.

While no one is forced to reply, we collectively answered your initial query but your list of questions is growing.

It has gotten to the point that you cannot expect the user base to type out paragraphs of information and exact methods which are readily available if you do some research yourself.

I think UG has a sticky link on wood prep, painting and finishes. Have a bit of a look around. I'm sure there are also u-tube tutorials you can look into and Google is a great knowledge base.

The internet is a wealth of information. Use it.
#15
Quote by Phoenix V
Naptha can be used as a thinning agent for the Tung Oil. As a previous poster said, mineral spirits or denatured alcohol is good also.

It has gotten to the point that you cannot expect the user base to type out paragraphs of information and exact methods which are readily available if you do some research yourself.

You guys are kinda right. I guess I was, and still am, too excited about all this and I wanted to know everything that instant and this seemed an appropriate method. I did do some research, though poor.
I would, however, have another thing to ask about using alcohol as a thinning agent. Not long ago, I dilluted some linseed oil in ethanol, applied it quite generously on a piece of wood, and the surface became a bit wrinkled, as if the veins (sorry, not sure about the name in English) sinked in about 0,5mm. Did too much of it cause that, or any of the ingredients?
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.