#1
Hey Guys,

Well ive been playing the basic minor and major pentatonic box shape for sooo long. So i decided to dive into the extended version of them..

Im wondering what are the pros and cons of using the extended version as opposed to the box shape ive been doing?

Ive already realized i feel the note changes from low to high alot more unique now and it sounds better then the old box shape.. but what else is there to do? should i stick with the box shape for now? With the old box shape i can play pretty fast on it and just need something new to start on now.

Thanks guys
#2
Learn all the positions of the pentatonic scale and you'll open yourself up to new possibilities of going all over the fretboard. Playing a solo on just one part of the fretboard is boring.

Also, learn the Major and Minor scales and pepper in extra notes to add some happy/sad/epic moods in there.
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#3
What do you mean by extended? If you mean just learning where the notes are on the board outside of the box, then learn the intervals and how the notes connect to each other. As for use, I use extended for riffing/improvisation/fresh ideas and box for speed.
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#4
Quote by Jmccorkle1222
Hey Guys,

Well ive been playing the basic minor and major pentatonic box shape for sooo long. So i decided to dive into the extended version of them..

Im wondering what are the pros and cons of using the extended version as opposed to the box shape ive been doing?

Ive already realized i feel the note changes from low to high alot more unique now and it sounds better then the old box shape.. but what else is there to do? should i stick with the box shape for now? With the old box shape i can play pretty fast on it and just need something new to start on now.

Thanks guys


Well, the "extended" version is really just moving up into a new "box".

in this diagram you can see them side by side. You should see your standard box shape (pattern 1), and in pattern 2 you should see the higher extensions.

as far as something new to start on. I would now spend some quality time playing music with that scale. Like learn some solos.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 15, 2011,
#6
Forget box shapes. First, learn the notes on your fretboard. That's pretty critical. Second, learn they key signatures so you know what notes are in whatever given key you're in. Then you can fly all over the fretboard because you know where all the notes you want to play are, so you don't have to be stuck in a shape.
#7
Quote by Jmccorkle1222
Hey Guys,

Well ive been playing the basic minor and major pentatonic box shape for sooo long. So i decided to dive into the extended version of them..

Im wondering what are the pros and cons of using the extended version as opposed to the box shape ive been doing?

Ive already realized i feel the note changes from low to high alot more unique now and it sounds better then the old box shape.. but what else is there to do? should i stick with the box shape for now? With the old box shape i can play pretty fast on it and just need something new to start on now.

Thanks guys

Stick with the box shapes, man. I also like to break out of them and join the shapes together to create 3nps lines, but you can create tensions over chords by looking into Pentatonic Substitution. This idea works best over static or slow moving progressions.
Quote by stratdax
Forget box shapes
I love the shapes, they make things easier to fathom.
Quote by Sean0913
You're going to hit a lot of unisons, so be ready for them, because they will sound like your melodic run is stalling out, learn how to use them for effect.

Yes, you're gonna get doubled notes but there's really cool ways outta that.

TS, the 3nps patterns that span 2 shapes will yield the unison when moving on to adjacent strings.

They're pretty cool, but if you want to avoid them, string skipping is the way out of that.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 15, 2011,
#8
Quote by mdc
I love the shapes, they make things easier to fathom.


Fair enough, but he really should learn the notes on his fretboard and the notes within the scale. Use shapes to make it easy to play without thinking, but understand why those shapes exist the way they do. Then he can create his own links between shapes rather than being paralyzed by ignorance.
#9
but understand why those shapes exist the way they do.

Sure +1, just didn't want to take the fun of it by forgetting shapes altogether, and I don't think you meant that anyway since you said...
First, learn the notes on your fretboard.

All good, brah.
#10
Quote by stratdax
Fair enough, but he really should learn the notes on his fretboard and the notes within the scale. Use shapes to make it easy to play without thinking, but understand why those shapes exist the way they do. Then he can create his own links between shapes rather than being paralyzed by ignorance.


This is an upper level skill that you develop into, the end game; as an instructor, its my opinion that they should not be appropriate for your average beginning intermediate guitarist. Shapes and box patterns are great, but as musicians mature and develop, then progress into those upper level tiers of approaching the instrument.

I don't advocate upper tier ideas for beginning guitarists, its a great way to put a millstone around their neck and block forward progress.

Best,

Sean
#11
So far i do understand the key notes of the scale like in minor 1 3b and 5. Ive been using those alot to keep on and add some vibrato maybe bend to a blues note. You guys are right tho, i dont know what every note in the scale is.. unless i sit and think about it for 10 sec..

Just wanted to give a update tho... Using the extended position between the 3 box positions is working great. and im finally like " this is how i sound this way :P ". Even the neighbors love listening to me play so i keep the window open.

IM FINALLY OUT OF THE DRYNESS OF REPEATING THE SAME NOTES! MY SOLOS AND GO MUCH LONGER NOW AND ARE MORE INTERESTING!!
#12
Quote by Sean0913
This is an upper level skill that you develop into, the end game; as an instructor, its my opinion that they should not be appropriate for your average beginning intermediate guitarist. Shapes and box patterns are great, but as musicians mature and develop, then progress into those upper level tiers of approaching the instrument.

I don't advocate upper tier ideas for beginning guitarists, its a great way to put a millstone around their neck and block forward progress.

Best,

Sean


I guess everybody learns in a different way. Personally, I needed to know why those shapes and patterns existed. Without that explanation these shapes and patterns were just meaningless fingerings. I was stuck in a rut for a long time because I simply didn't know how or, more importantly, why the patterns and boxes functioned. It was dumb. Like answering all questions on your homework with answers pulled straight from an answer key, I didn't learn anything or progress at all.

Once I learnt how scales function and how they related to my fretboard, I progressed far more rapidly in the next month than I did in the past year. I was also much more satisfied and actually wanted to play my guitar more, because I knew what I was doing and why.

That's just me though, and as I said, everybody learns in a different way. So if the OP says this:
"IM FINALLY OUT OF THE DRYNESS OF REPEATING THE SAME NOTES! MY SOLOS AND GO MUCH LONGER NOW AND ARE MORE INTERESTING!!"
He's obviously happy and satisfied, so who am I to argue?

Good going Jmccorkle1222, keep it up.