#1
So im learning "wonderfull slippery thing" by amazing guitarist guthire govan.
Ill be improvising in the verses.
Chord progression:
Bm7-D9-Gmaj7-F#7

Im fairly new to jazz stuff, so what shuld i play over it i know its a 1-3-6-5 progression in Bm, but what cool notes/scales can i add to spesific chords? Im starting to learn altered+lydian dominant scale, can i use them?
Thanks!
#2
I'd primarily suggest taking the chord tone approach. I wouldn't think of it as there being any special scales to play over each chord. Just stick to Bm and follow the changes. The main thing that is likely to add some spice and make it jazzy is tastefully using chromaticism in your lines around the changes.

Sorry if this seems like a non-answer. There's not too much to say when it comes to telling someone miles away what to play over a given set of changes, other than to play notes that fit the changes.
#3
Quote by Usernames sucks
but what cool scales can i add to spesific chords? Im starting to learn altered+lydian dominant scale, can i use them?
Thanks!

The Lydian Dominant scale is used for non-functioning dominant chords. The Altered Scale is great over the F#7 though.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 16, 2011,
#4
Good that you know the progression is in B minor, and because it's going by so quickly, in my opinion, the altered sounds you can use over this progression are limited.

As a basic guide, B minor pentatonic will work great over the whole thing, turn up the shred.

As far as the altered notes, I wouldn't necissarily think in terms of scales, more as chord tones that you can (or not) choose to use.

Because dominant chords are our main chords we like to use altered notes over I'll adress those first.

D7: You can use a plain old Mixolydian here, the only altered notes I would use (of course take my advice with a pinch of salt) are the #9 and #5. Not only are these two alterations very commonly used in tandem with each other, take a look at how the relate to the B minor tonal center. Our #9 becomes a b5 and our #5 becomes our 7, both completely adequate sounds to use over the original minor chord. As far as some of the other altered sounds, I wouldn't use b9 (at least not as a primary sound, by all means pass over it if you wish) the b9 amounts a major 3rd over the original B minor, despite giving you an example of this next one later on, I wouldn't use it overly if at all. The b5 over the D7 is an Ab which is the b9 of the chord you are going to (Gmaj7)

As far as the F#7 is concerned, although the 1 b2 #2 3 part of the altered scale works quite niceley, I wouldn't use the entire scale. the b2 and #2 are G and A, both entirely valid notes (for most of the progression). If we opt with the altered sound, we also get a C natural (b5), which in this users opinion, is only really valid over the D7 (just my opinion) #5 is an entirely valid sound over the F#7 as well, D (although natural 5 works just fine as well). So over the F#7 altered works fine, though I would advise using a natural 5 instead of a b5. I also wouldn't use a natural 13 or 9 (as they are in relation to the B minor the Major third and Major sixth (though this former sound is more negotiable than the former)

Two other lines which I find to be rather tasty over this progression (simple chromatically descending lines, by all means experiment around with your own)

Bmin7 C#
D7 C
Gmaj7 B
F#7 A#

Bmin7 A
D7 G#
Gmaj7 G
F#7 F#

Now I know I broke some of my aforementioned rules, but I think in the cases of the two examples above, the chromatically descending logic of the line carries the listeners ear through any temporary confusion.
#5
Quote by Usernames sucks
Im fairly new to jazz stuff, so what shuld i play over it i know its a 1-3-6-5 progression in Bm, but what cool notes chords?
Thanks!

The note E will work over all the chords. It just changes function as the chords change. Sometimes it acts as a tension, others a chord tone.

Gotta go, there's loads of options over this though. Just use your ear.
#6
Quote by mdc
The note E will work over all the chords. It just changes function as the chords change. Sometimes it acts as a tension, others a chord tone.

Gotta go, there's loads of options over this though. Just use your ear.


True dat, same with F#. A and B as well, but less so.
Last edited by jesse music at Nov 16, 2011,
#7
From Guthrie himself:

You can actually jam over the solo sections in this track and achieve some pretty good results using nothing more complex than the humble Bm pentatonic scale. This is splendid news: it means that a player who may not feel entirely comfortable with the whole jazz/fusion thing can simply build on that trusty pentatonic framework. adding one new idea at a time.
A few chromatic notes can work very well here if they’re applied in the right way, but the most important thing is to stay focused on what’s actually going on in the chord progression. Try these scale choices, if you feel so inclined...
For the B section:
Bm7 - B aeolian
D9 - D mixolydian
Gmaj7 - G lydian
F#7b9 - F# phrygian dominant (if you like Yngwie) or F# superlocrian (if you like Larry!)
Additional info for the E section:
Em11 - E dorian (the same notes as the B aeolian and G lydian we encountered earlier.) This will work for the whole of bars 25-26, so don’t panic about the density of the chords as notated in the tab - everything’s going to be just fine.

A11 - A mixolydian
A#dim7 - you could interpret this as an F#7b9 with no root, and use F# phrygian dominant. You might also like to try the whole-half diminished scale, starting on A#. Or you could play it safe and stick to the notes of the A#dim7 arpeggio. (Frankly, it’s only there for one beat at the end of bar 23... so you could be forgiven for not worrying too much about this chord!)