#1
Lets say that i want to jam in the key G. In order to do that and stay in that key do i just play diffetent combinations of notes from all the diferent modes for G to create more range of sound so im moving across the fret board more not just staying in one area? (Ionian, Dorian, Phyrigan, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian)
#3
No. Modes are not applicable here. They probably never will be for the kind of music you're likely playing. Why do you think you have to stay in one "area" of the fretboard? You can move all over the fretboard playing notes from E major. (Which I assume is the key you're playing in, since you just said "E" and not "E minor".)

Do you know the notes on your fretboard?
Last edited by stratdax at Nov 15, 2011,
#4
dont worry about modes right now just play

if you playing in the key of G just play in the key of G if the other guys your jammin with with have a set chords to change to play witht he changed and hit some chord tones
#5
Quote by stratdax
No. Modes are not applicable here. They probably never will be for the kind of music you're likely playing. Why do you think you have to stay in one "area" of the fretboard? You can move all over the fretboard playing notes from E major.


This. No modes.

I want you to go here and look at an E major scale on the fretboard. You can play those notes and be in key while jamming in the key of E major.

Clicky

Last edited by Zeppelin Addict at Nov 15, 2011,
#6
I'm going to guess you think that G is just a position on the fretboard that covers a couple of frets. It's not. The notes repeat through the entire thing.

Behold, the G major scale!



As said above modes are not applicable. And they're not positions on the fretboard either. If you're looking for "shapes", check out the CAGED method.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by Electra327
Lets say that i want to jam in the key G. In order to do that and stay in that key do i just play diffetent combinations of notes from all the diferent modes for G to create more range of sound so im moving across the fret board more not just staying in one area? (Ionian, Dorian, Phyrigan, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian)

It depends what chord is being played at the time, and the context of that chord in the surrounding harmonic situation.
#8
So if i want to jam in E major i have to learn The scale that goes through the whole fretboard or at least the relevent part? Also what are modes used for?
(sorry for any stupid questions!)
thanks for all the help!
#9
Quote by Electra327
So if i want to jam in E major i have to learn The scale that goes through the whole fretboard or at least the relevant part?

S'all relevant. Every part of the fretboard is. Shapes are great for ease of use, developing muscle memory and training your ear, but as you said earlier, it's the notes.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 16, 2011,
#10
Quote by Electra327
So if i want to jam in E major i have to learn The scale that goes through the whole fretboard or at least the relevent part? Also what are modes used for?
(sorry for any stupid questions!)
thanks for all the help!

You don't have to learn all the scales for E major.
You can just play in root position but other positions might come in handy if you want to do something particular.
Modes are used for old (really old) music.
EDIT:Also to be in the key of E major your chord progression must sound like home at an E major.
Really a scale is just a guide of where you can play when soloing.
Last edited by liampje at Nov 16, 2011,
#11
I solo in relative minor, or minor pentatonic (for E it's c#) it's just like using your E major scale, but a more playable form.
#12
Quote by Irateskater1
I solo in relative minor, or minor pentatonic (for E it's c#) it's just like using your E major scale, but a more playable form.

You can better use E minor pentatonics then.
#13
Quote by Irateskater1
I solo in relative minor, or minor pentatonic (for E it's c#) it's just like using your E major scale, but a more playable form.


You are not soloing in C# minor. You are still soloing in E major. I see this a lot - somebody associates the typical shape of a scale with what the scale actually is. You are still soloing in E major, even if you are using the typical "shape" that you might associate with a minor pentatonic starting at C#. It's important that you understand the difference between a shape of the scale, and the function of a scale.
#14
Man i dont know many modes at all, just the normal pentatonic and a couple other exotic scales. Use palm muting, bends to blues notes and other notes u know come next withen the normal scale, If you got a floyd rose bridge use it! And change up your effects if you got to

good luck and wish u were here to jam with me!
#16
Quote by stratdax
You are not soloing in C# minor. You are still soloing in E major. I see this a lot - somebody associates the typical shape of a scale with what the scale actually is. You are still soloing in E major, even if you are using the typical "shape" that you might associate with a minor pentatonic starting at C#. It's important that you understand the difference between a shape of the scale, and the function of a scale.


Funny thing, if you take the C# minor pentatonic and start on the E, the shape's suddenly a 'shape' of the E major pentatonic.

The first note in a shape doesn't dictate tonality, too many people don't realize this. Learning a scale is very, very different from learning a moveable fretboard shape.

The best thing you can do is learning to highlight chord tones over a given progression.
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#17
Quote by Irateskater1
I solo in relative minor, or minor pentatonic (for E it's c#) it's just like using your E major scale, but a more playable form.

Think of it as E Major Pentatonic shape 5. Nothing more, nothing less. So in essence, you are using the E Major Scale.
#18
Quote by mdc
Think of it as E Major Pentatonic shape 5. Nothing more, nothing less. So in essence, you are using the E Major Scale.


Its just easier for me to visualize as a first shape. That's why I go the minor path.but in the end it's the same notes. So however u get there u get works.
#19
Quote by Irateskater1
Its just easier for me to visualize as a first shape. That's why I go the minor path.but in the end it's the same notes. So however u get there u get works.

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#20
Quote by Irateskater1
Its just easier for me to visualize as a first shape. That's why I go the minor path.but in the end it's the same notes. So however u get there u get works.

You can visualize it like that, but don't say you are actually playing the minor scale because that's just wrong.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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