#1
i was reading a few old textbooks today for some odd reason (pre grad stuff) and thought of a great idea.

instead of people going online and saying they are disappointed in a guitar (mainly it is QC stuff), or just poor quality. they could do this (only applies to gear you buy new).

i have never bought a guitar from any manufacturer that hasn't been shipped with a little card of people signing off on the guitar (a gibson has a little booklet with all the numbers on the back as far as string height, etc). there are always initials or a stamp from a final QC inspector.

so if you get the instrument and it feels sub-par, along quality control, wouldn't it make sense
to contact the manufacturer and tell them the initials of the person who signed off on a guitar that isn't up to standards.

say a bunch of people complained about the same guy. the manufacturer would probably want to (hopefully) do something about that person.

realistically the last person who deals with the guitar, probably the QC guy is the weakest link in the chain essentially and by putting a person in there who paid more attention to detail, sub-par instruments would be rectified by fixing what ever is wrong with the guitar. then better guitars come out and they would have better customer satisfaction.

just a thought.

what do you think?
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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#2
But essentially by doing that, you're making the company work harder and that would be reflected in their pricing on their guitars.
I'm FAT!
#3
Quote by tatatotfolife
But essentially by doing that, you're making the company work harder and that would be reflected in their pricing on their guitars.


yea and no. say the bad QC guy gets ditched no change in cost of anything there, really. a good guy comes in. two things occur.

1. happier customers
2. slightly higher cost of fixing a defected guitar thus the potential with the cost rising. but... would you rather pay an extra say 5% on a guitar or would you want to have to a defected item and have to return it and go through that hassle and buzzkill of opening the box and seeing that you aren't happy with it wait for returns to process, then get one a few weeks later, or maybe even longer.

if i were to be running a company that has an issue like that i would prefer pleasing my customers and making them happy the first time and have them buy another in a year.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#4
I do QC for PRS and Ibanez, if you have a problem with a guitar then send it back we will exchange it or fix it right away. Some customers can not be pleased no matter what you do, there are those problem children everywhere who have nothing better to do then complain. Lets not forget it´s still just a guitar and necks can warp in transit and those who transport them dont care whats in the box, they´ll just toss it in the truck along with everything else and who knows what happens then, but as I mentioned before send it back if you are not satisfied, it is your money.
#5
Cool idea but I wouldn't really want to go through that trouble and I'd hate to get someone fired. Besides I would always play a guitar prior to buying it.
West Ham United
#6
The problem is that most people who think a guitar is flawed just don't know what the **** they're talking about. Most of the time the guitar just hasn't been set up the way they're used to or simply isn't the right kind of guitar for them. If you look online you'll see lots of people marking guitars down for having action too high or for having a neck that's too thick or too thin or complaining the pickups aren't quite right or whatever. All things that come down to set up and/or personal preference.

People are stupid and if you give them a way to complain they'll bore you to death with bullshit complaints that aren't valid.
#7
more importantly, if someone isn't happy with a product or service, they wont address the one issue thats actually bothered them, they will think of a half dozen other nonsensical issues that take seconds to resolve or isn't even a concern to them to add more weight to their complaint.
#8
Let me entertain this thought.

You'd also have to look at the aggregate impression. What's more common in the professional world: negative feedback or positive feedback? And keep in mind the effort involved. People are lazy. That's one reason why we have fast food. Also, how often do you hear, "That was awesome!" when you were in school compared to when in the professional world?

Seriously, though. There are other criticisms for this system, though I agree in principle. What you're saying is a basic tenet of a meritocracy. If you're incompetent at a job, you don't do it anymore. Ideals are funny.

You have to factor in trolls. I'm not going to go as far as to say that it'd be commonplace for one person with a bad experience to get tech-savvy friends to hack a serial number database for the purpose of ousting a QC employee. I will say that such a situation's possible. People get bored and do flat-out retarded things. The vox populi is full of people, and plenty of them possess computers and atrophied empathy.

Like sstony said (with a presumably professional background (sorry, but this is the impersonal internet, though I mean no personal offense)), there are factors beyond the QC personnel's control (shipping, individual stores' care). What's acceptable in the factory prior to distribution could be unacceptable to the end user. Said user could be someone who played the guitar in a shop, bought it, and found flaws soon after. Maybe a more knowledgeable friend/relative could have evaluated the instrument after the purchase. Yes, that's unwise, but it's very possible. He or she could also be obsessive about certain aspects, i.e. the "problem child." While rare, the user could also be someone in my awkward situation. I'm going to buy a lower-high-end guitar this month from an online retailer and have it shipped to a location where a trusted friend can test it out for me in my stead for a few months. If my friend reports to me it's flawed, do I complain to the manufacturer? What responsibility does the retailer have? Furthermore, people tend to look at the easiest target to shoot. Blah blah Paterno leaving it at telling his immediate superiors blah blah blah.

Actually, that's another point. If someone complains or gives praise, what guarantee is there that their words will reach the manufacturer if the equipment is purchased from a third party? If you're looking for something absolute and systematic, that'd be difficult to accomplish even domestically, let alone if the buyer and manufacturer are in different countries. This also assumes that at least a statistically significant portion of new buyers provides feedback. I'll use a random hypothetical: If 47,000 people buy a guitar, 67 people leave positive feedback, and 52 leave negative feedback, what do you do? 67/47,000 is a tiny percentage, but 52/67 isn't. Should the company focus on the latter percentage or total sales volume?

Think about the last time you went to a restaurant. If the food was fine, what did you say? Was it a blithe response that it was good, thank you, then get back to dutifully clearing your plate? If it was bad, what did you say? Were you more critical with the sub-par meal? Now imagine your server reporting back to the kitchen. Go ahead and imagine. If you haven't already marked this post as TL; DR, you have the intellect and a few seconds to spare.

Back with me? Good. Compare the reactions. The "everything's fine, fine, fine" response would be brushed off: "The steak tasted fine." "The pasta was great." "Everything's good. Thanks. More water, please." Now think about the critical responses: "There was too much salt in the soup." "I found a fingernail in my pinot grigio, which tasted like a chardonnay anyway." "Were there egg shells in the crab cakes? I'm allergic to eggs." "The burger had too much sauce." Is it evident that positive and negative criticisms have to be tailored to the rock-stupid method of a graduating scale system with room for additional commentary?

Then again, some practices are probably already in place. At the very least rudiments of them are, as are many more I've either neglected or forgotten to include. After all, there are internal regulations to limit error before a guitar reaches the general public. I now defer you to the episode "Inspector 34" of the series The Adventures of Pete & Pete.

Boogity, boogity, boogity. Amen.
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