#1
Hi,

I keep getting told I need to fit into the rhythm and groove of the music more when I am soloing. I have been told my note choices are good but that I need to make what I play more connected rhythmically. This is mainly said when doing jazz and fusion, but applies to rock and other stuff as well.

I was wondering if you guys have any tips that could help me achieve this. I feel it is some thing very important and worth while to improve on and could take my lead playing forwards in a huge leap.

I usually do slip into the groove eventually, but I keep getting told I need to be in there right from the start, and I agree with that.

This question does not go in any way towards rhythm guitar, as I have to problems in that department. It refers purely to soloing and improvisation.


Thanks in advanced for any advice you can give.
#2
If you can get into the groove eventually, that means that you are capable of understanding rythms and connecting your playing to that rythm. The problem must be from your head to your fingers.

I always try to think of a few lines before soloing. Just sing them, because that comes more naturally. Then try to play those lines, or at least the same timing as your lines. Practise and there should be no problems at all
#3
1) Make sure you can play straight 8ths, triplets and 16ths comfortably over your backing. (this could take a lot of practice!)
2) Try to make sure you're always landing on a chord tone on the one - your licks sound a lot groovier once you can confidently synch up with the changes.

I think those two will help. Another fun thing is to steal the rhythms of drum fills and use them as lead licks.
#4
Quote by jkielq91
Hi,

I keep getting told I need to fit into the rhythm and groove of the music more when I am soloing. I have been told my note choices are good but that I need to make what I play more connected rhythmically. This is mainly said when doing jazz and fusion, but applies to rock and other stuff as well.

I was wondering if you guys have any tips that could help me achieve this. I feel it is some thing very important and worth while to improve on and could take my lead playing forwards in a huge leap.

I usually do slip into the groove eventually, but I keep getting told I need to be in there right from the start, and I agree with that.

This question does not go in any way towards rhythm guitar, as I have to problems in that department. It refers purely to soloing and improvisation.


Thanks in advanced for any advice you can give.

Band communication. Not verbally but visually and aurally, look at the drummer, and listen to the bassist, these two guys are the "rhythm" section of the band, although strictly speaking, you all are really but....

You said you have to be in there right from the start, do you mean from your lead break, or literally the start of the song?

When I played the funk tune "Thinking Of You" for LPW, the drummer gives you a stick count in, and then tacet's, this tune is actually slower than what a lot of people think.

I had the issue of playing the intro riff ever so slightly too fast, mainly due to the pressure of the fact that it's just you, and the guitar is out in the open, no secrets at sea.

Sure as hell got it down now, but you just have to "feel it", man. I know I sound like a hippie, but it really is that, along with the aforementioned communication skills.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 17, 2011,
#5
Quote by mdc
Band communication. Not verbally but visually and aurally, look at the drummer, and listen to the bassist, these two guys are the "rhythm" section of the band, although strictly speaking, you all are really but....

You said you have to be in there right from the start, do you mean from your lead break, or literally the start of the song?

When I played the funk tune "Thinking Of You" for LPW, the drummer gives you a stick count in, and then tacet's, this tune is actually slower than what a lot of people think.

I had the issue of playing the intro riff ever so slightly too fast, mainly due to the pressure of the fact that it's just you, and the guitar is out in the open, no secrets at sea.

Sure as hell got it down now, but you just have to "feel it", man. I know I sound like a hippie, but it really is that, along with the aforementioned communication skills.



I mean purely from the start of the solo/ improvisation. Yesterday we did St Jean and then had jazz, where will also all played with the teacher, and he gave me the same feedback both times, and has also said it in the past. In fact half the class seemed to get that advice, so it seems like a very common problem.

Oh, and Thinking of You was one crazy LPW. Every one struggled big time. Morale was so low for the rest of the day.


Quote by Freepower
1) Make sure you can play straight 8ths, triplets and 16ths comfortably over your backing. (this could take a lot of practice!)
2) Try to make sure you're always landing on a chord tone on the one - your licks sound a lot groovier once you can confidently synch up with the changes.

I think those two will help. Another fun thing is to steal the rhythms of drum fills and use them as lead licks.


In the bit I have highlighted, do you mean when you land on beat 1 or when you land on the I chord?
Last edited by jkielq91 at Nov 17, 2011,
#7
Quote by Freepower
On beat 1, sorry.


Thanks.

The best advice I think I have ever been given about soloing and improvising is that as long as your well in the rhythm, and end on a good note, like a chord tone, it will sound right, even if you hit a wrong note.

Your advice has to added to that advice nicely!
Last edited by jkielq91 at Nov 17, 2011,