#1
Hullo good people of UG, my question to you is the one that has already been posed in the thread title: In your honest opinions, what seems to be the better deal?

Steinberg's UR28M,

or

Avid's latest Mbox?

I am an absolute beginner when it comes to recording of any kind, although I've been doing my homework on it for about 2 years now. At the moment I'm interested mainly in recording one or two instrument at a time (I sing and I play the guitar). I have no idea what difference in "feel" Cubase and Pro Tools have from each other, again since I am a complete newbie at this and have never had the chance to try them out. I simply want to start with a great piece of kit that I can learn on and eventually get good quality recordings out of. If you have an alternative that you'd like to suggest, then by all means do, but if you could also give a substantiated opinion on these two, then I would be very grateful.
- Ibanez SA220
- LTD EC-1000
- Marshall MG100DFX
- Blackstar HT-Dual Distortion Pedal
- Marshall Jackhammer Distortion/Overdrive Pedal
- EHX Cathedral Reverb Pedal
- Boss PW-10 Wah
- Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor
- Boss TU-3 Tuner
#2
The previous Mboxs had horrible mic pres for the price, I can't imagine them fixing it this time around. Haven't tried the Steinberg, but the higher end units have pres and converters that rival RMEs twice its price.

As far as Cubase vs. Pro Tools go - Honestly, I'd go with Cubase. As a beginner, I assume you don't have a collection of plugins, and the multitude of great, free, VST plugins out there is much larger than what's available via RTAS. In order to use VST plugins on Pro Tools, you'll have to buy a wrapper that costs $100. Also - Avid has REALLY screwed its customers with the upgrade price to Pro Tools 10 and it has lost a huge amount of customers to it that have jumped ship to Presonus Studio One, Cubase, Logic, etc. Their stocks have fallen significantly over the past few months and I'm not sure I would invest too much money in them at this point.

In all honesty, both programs are great, but Pro Tools still lacks a lot of features that Cubase and all the other big named DAWs came out with years ago, Avid has been behind the times in their DAW for years, and they have a lot of catching up to do. On the other hand, there's a lot of things that Pro Tools makes easier to do than the others and its workflow may suit you better. Neither DAW is incapable of getting great mixes - Just know that with the Mbox, I'm fairly sure you don't get any recording software included, not saying that Cubase AI included with the Steinberg unit is the greatest and that you couldn't use Reaper for cheap with either one, but it's something to think about.

In a value comparison, the Mbox really doesn't even touch the Steinberg unit. I'm fairly sure the UR28M has the same converters as the MR816, which is an awesome unit, especially if you're running Cubase.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#3
Thanks for that dude, I didn't know that the situation with Pro Tools was like that... I've already got Reaper installed on my laptop, I guess the important thing now is a good piece of hardware I can not only learn on, but ultimately get good results with too. Cheers for that

Any more opinions, peeps?
- Ibanez SA220
- LTD EC-1000
- Marshall MG100DFX
- Blackstar HT-Dual Distortion Pedal
- Marshall Jackhammer Distortion/Overdrive Pedal
- EHX Cathedral Reverb Pedal
- Boss PW-10 Wah
- Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor
- Boss TU-3 Tuner
#4
Have you considered not using your PC? If you're just wanting a home set up which can provide you with decent quality recordings, you should also look into the possibility of using a dedicated multitracker as your DAW.

They provide all the same basic functions as the equivalent software and are generally easier to use as well as being more portable if you wanted to take them to band practices / gigs etc

There are advantages and disadvantages to both software and multitracker DAWs:
  • With software, you get unlimited tracks and the possibility of using additional plugins if you need them, but will need to spend significantly more time working on the final mix to get everything perfect.
  • With multitrackers, you get everything you need in a single purpose built unit, more effects and EQ than a typical home user would require and you aren't tied to your PC when you want to record something, but obviously you're limited to the number of tracks the multitracker has (although most provide virtual tracks as well as the ability to bounce multiple tracks onto a single track) and you can't use the additional plugins that software can provide if you decided you needed them.


There is also the third option of buying a Zoom R8/16/24, which acts as a standalone multitracker, but is also designed to work as a PC interface and software control board.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#5
I have the Steinberg MR816, and the pres are brilliant. I love it.

If that unit has the same pres, I'd go for it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.