#1
Sweep Picking:
I've been working on sweep picking for a few days now, and I have the basic idea of it down, the left and right hand movements, working on playing each note individually in the sweep, I've pretty much got that down. My problem is that the notes I've already played ring out when I'm on the next few notes. Should I move my picking hand up and down as I pick to mute them? Is there another way I could stop them from ringing out?

Tapping:
Again, tapping is something I have down. The problem is that it's not very loud when I go into it. Is it because I'm not tapping hard enough with my picking hand? My guitar is a Les Paul Jr., with the single P90 pickup - is the problem that the pickup isn't suited for tapping on the higher strings?
#2
Quote by ironmanben
Sweep Picking:
I've been working on sweep picking for a few days now, and I have the basic idea of it down, the left and right hand movements, working on playing each note individually in the sweep, I've pretty much got that down. My problem is that the notes I've already played ring out when I'm on the next few notes. Should I move my picking hand up and down as I pick to mute them? Is there another way I could stop them from ringing out?

A mix of fret hand mutes and pick hand mutes...that is probably the toughest part to get down about sweeping.

Quote by ironmanben
Tapping:
Again, tapping is something I have down. The problem is that it's not very loud when I go into it. Is it because I'm not tapping hard enough with my picking hand? My guitar is a Les Paul Jr., with the single P90 pickup - is the problem that the pickup isn't suited for tapping on the higher strings?

Might be the pickups...try tapping on a guitar with very different pickups, such as active humbuckers, and see if the first tap is still too soft compared to other things. Otherwise, make sure you make a clear note with your picking hand, which is strong, and a definitive release onto the first note for your fret hand
#3
Using the picking hand to mute on the way down, and the fretting hand on the way up, is the most common and (to me) the simplest method of sweep-muting. Other than that, make sure you start off very slowly and as cleanly as possible and don't pull-off the strings. This usually takes a while to do quickly and cleanly, so you need to be able to pull off the strings without performing a 'pull-off' on them, if that makes sense. You'll get fluid with time - it can take weeks, even months to sweep pick cleanly and usably. While you're learning the technique, learn to incorporate arpeggios into your playing as well - learn the function of sweeping, or you'll just be eye candy, doing another obnoxious tweedley weedley trick on your solos rather than composing intelligently. Tapping as well, since that's typically in arpeggios, as well.

Legato on your left-hand has probably been developed for a really long time - you can't expect your picking hand fingers to be as strong as your fretting fingers with hammering on and pulling off. Again, it just takes time - get it clean, get it slow, then speed it up, and use it creatively (look at Sequoia Throne by Protest the Hero, good example of simple 5-finger tapping in the 'hook' riff, and the chorus lick is interesting and fairly simple 1-string triad tapping.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#4
Sweeping: Try putting a bit of ribbon or a wide elastic hair tie around the nut of your guitar, a lot of guitarists do this to help dampen the deaden the unfretted strings whilst doing large sweep, string skipping, tapping, etc sections. Then you just slide it slightly over the nut when you're done with it and need to play open chords and such. Its a nifty thing, very nifty. The getting your sweeps clean IS the hardest part about sweeping indeed.

Tapping: Yeah, like Darkness in Zero said above, try it out on another guitar with humbuckers, or actives, anything else really that's got a little more umph! You could also try practicing on an acoustic guitar too. You need to tap it harder to get a loud enough sound and you just shred harder on there in general if you're in the zone, so when you transfer this playing onto the electric you'll have a stronger grasp at bending, picking, and all sorts of fretting the board.

Good luck dude.

Quote by Hail
Look at Sequoia Throne by Protest the Hero, good example of simple 5-finger tapping in the 'hook' riff, and the chorus lick is interesting and fairly simple 1-string triad tapping


Have you seen the official tabs they (PTH) made for the Fortress album? Cause. They ain't really played like that. :/ Or... I possibly don't get you.
Last edited by Mr.-Bungle at Nov 16, 2011,
#5
Quote by Mr.-Bungle
Sweeping: Try putting a bit of ribbon or a wide elastic hair tie around the nut of your guitar, a lot of guitarists do this to help dampen the deaden the unfretted strings whilst doing large sweep, string skipping, tapping, etc sections.

Don't do that. It'll only teach you bad technique, cuz it lets you get away with sloppy playing. Don't Don't Don't do that.

Quote by Mr.-Bungle

You could also try practicing on an acoustic guitar too.

I totally forgot about this. This is good. If you practice tapping on an acoustic, where it is much more difficult, then when you go back to an electric you'll sound amazing. Do Do Do that.
#6
Quote by ironmanben
Tapping:
Again, tapping is something I have down. The problem is that it's not very loud when I go into it. Is it because I'm not tapping hard enough with my picking hand? My guitar is a Les Paul Jr., with the single P90 pickup - is the problem that the pickup isn't suited for tapping on the higher strings?


No, the problem is you, you suck and that's where the issue lies. No one else has said it directly but you cannot blame your gear; I've never found a guitar I couldn't tap on since I got my technique up to scratch.

Firm attack, near the fret wire, use both hands to mute the rest of the strings as much as possible, make sure the motion is coming from your finger and not your arm or you're using too much movement and energy.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Quote by Darkness in Zero
Don't do that. It'll only teach you bad technique, cuz it lets you get away with sloppy playing. Don't Don't Don't do that.

I'd say it's fine to do it, if only so you can develop an impression of what level of cleanliness and proficiency you should be aiming to emulate all the time.

When I first started with techniques for playing extended arpeggio lines and the like, predominantly with multiple tapping fingers, I'd use a dampener for this very reason - so that I could hear and understand first-hand exactly what level of cleanliness I could work towards, and what would be possible if I refined my muting technique and articulation. I'd only have the dampener on for a short while, just for an impression, and then slide it out while aiming to replicate that level of cleanliness. If you can record the two approaches and play them back-to-back, either as the same recording or two stuck end-on-end, you can present yourself with a real eye-opener.

I do agree that you shouldn't rely on it as a crutch to excuse an under-developed technique, but it's definitely useful in setting a bar to aim for.