#1
wanted to know what program most of you might use to make fretboard diagrams
for chords an scales .

like so




i usually use a blank fretboard off the internet and the paint program in win 7 .

thought there may be a better program out there i don't know about .
#2
Most of us don't as far as I'm aware; we use knowledge of the fretboard and a proper understanding of scales.
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#3
OK so how did you learn your scales & chords if you didn't read a scale chart or chord chart ?

i think if someone is learning from you . you would use a chart of some type so
they could memorize scale patterns .
#7
Watch and learn or read and learn.

I actually only ever learnt one scale by following a scale diagram. Everything else I've just worked out with basic theory and an understanding of how the fretboard works.
#8
^^ glad you were able to learn with such ease . but unfortunately i will have to use
something as a guide .

and even the link for theory in your sig. has charts to go by in the lessons .

im just looking for an easier way to make them like the program MDC suggests .
#9
I don't think you can really call 8 or so years of working things out "ease" but it's certainly easier than memorising thousands of scale diagrams.

It's like the difference between buying ready meals and learning to cook. We all give in occasionally but it's a much better idea to learn to cook.
#10
^ Freepower, do you mind if I steal that line about the cooking? It's great

I only think I ever used one scale diagram too, but since I started working through some theory books I find it more rewarding and fun to work stuff out yourself. It also means you /really/ learn it. I find sometimes if you do something yourself you internalise it much better.
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#11
o so neither one of you learned the 5 basic box shapes for the major
scale when you started playing ?

that would take a long time just to learn the major scale over the entire fretboard .

props to the both of you for learning in a rather tough way .
#12
When you play a scale, do you just play it, or do you listen to the quality of the intervals within it? Cuz it'll help you in identifying it all over the neck.

Also, for some "ear bending" techniques, try sequencing a scale with wider intervallic leaps, such as diatonic 5ths, 6ths and 7ths. Not only is that good for your ear, it's good for your for fretting hand, and develops strong skipping accuracy with the picking hand also.

I only use that software for students, in conjunction with the above advice. You can get a lot of mileage out of one shape with knowledge of intervals and ear training to navigate your way across the fretboard.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 17, 2011,
#14
@MDC & freepower : i understand intervals well and when i play songs i can tell you the intervals from note to note .

i look at scales like this :

i take the major scale of C i know that A minor is the same notes . in order
to get an A harmonic scale i just think to sharpen the 7th degree of the scale

i know that alot might say that A minor is not part of the C major scale its
an A maj scale with a b3 b6 b7 . its just easier for me to think of it as
the same notes of the C Maj scale .

i would like to know how you guys look at the fretboard for your scales .

do you basically alter one note like i do for the harmonic and other altered scales ?

edit: i basically learned the 5 box shapes of the major scale then alter the notes
for the other altered scales like mentioned .
Last edited by fenprod at Nov 17, 2011,
#15
i know that alot might say that A minor is not part of the C major scale its
an A maj scale with a b3 b6 b7 .

Parallel approach

its just easier for me to think of it as
the same notes of the C Maj scale .

Derivative approach

i would like to know how you guys look at the fretboard for your scales .

I prefer the parallel approach. It helps to understand the sound of a scale better.

Sorry to bring modes in to this but this is the parallel approach.

1:35 onwards.
#16
1:35 onwards.


Missing link?

i would like to know how you guys look at the fretboard for your scales.


I see intervals based around my chord/key root notes. If you can see the major scale well and alter it confidently then that's all you need.

Might use that fretboard diagram thing myself now to prepare tomorrows lessons... >.>
#17
Quote by Freepower
Missing link?

Oh, haha.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mbrAlE9pC4

Sure you've seen it before, pretty much everyone has, but it's just to better describe the parallel approach.
#18
Fenprod, I used the 2 & 3 octave fingering paths from classical guitar virtuosso Andres Sgeovia's book "Diatonic Major and Melodic Minor Scales" book. It provides extremely efficient fingering paths up and down each 2 or 3 octave scale mountain. I believe in this book so much, that I give it 2-3 hours of my practice time EVERY day. Once I learned all the Major/melodic minor stuff, I took Segovia's idea and applied it/used it to map out every minor blues/lydian/lydian dominant/mixolydian/dorian/raga scale/hungarian gypsy scale/harmonic minor scale starting w/ the order of sharps and then the order of flats...it was very tough @ first, but it gets easier over time. (-: keep @ it man!
#19
^ some of the most exotic scales are just pentatonic scales with raised or lowered notes and some leaps.

Indian, Kumoi, Hirajoshi, Iwato, Pelog, Scriabin, Egyptian, Banshiki-cho, Ritusen, Rwanda Pygme.

Mattias IA Eklundh has a good site for this. Although knowing his soh, he's probably taking the piss. Lol
Last edited by mdc at Nov 18, 2011,
#21
Ah yes, you can't beat a bit of lateral playing.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 18, 2011,
#22
Quote by mdc


Parallel approach

Derivative approach

I prefer the parallel approach. It helps to understand the sound of a scale better


thx for the reminder of what the approaches were called.


Quote by mdc
Sorry to bring modes in to this but this is the parallel approach.

1:35 onwards.


yea that's why i didn't say Aeolian

i think Satch also calls the parallel approach pitch axis don't he ?


BTW: that program is nice , the scale generator is great although they don't allow
much time with it before they shut the options down .