#1
Hey guys, I have a very limited knowledge on music theory and have been trying to tackle modes for what seems like forever. I checked out the modes sticky, but realized I don't really have a great foundation, which would make learning modes that much more difficult.

Basically, I know how a major scale is formed and the chords in it. Whoopy do, right. So can anyone recommend some good theory books so I can built a good foundation and later learn modes? A lot of threads on here seem great, but I need something that has more structure. Thanks a lot.
#2
Why are you do desperate to learn modes?
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#3
Do not learn modes yet. You do not have the required background.

Edit: I reread your post, this time all the way through, and it seems like you want to learn everything, and get that foundation before learning modes...

I enjoyed reading Music THeory For Dummies, and I hear only good things about musictheory.net
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

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I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Last edited by vampirelazarus at Nov 17, 2011,
#5
Quote by vampirelazarus
Do not learn modes yet. You do not have the required background.

That's what I'm saying. I'd like to do some reading so I do have a good background.

I want to learn modes because I never stray away from Ionian. Same chords, different key. I want to learn how to make more.. interesting music.
#7
Yeah, forget about modes for now. I have no idea why so many people are desperate to know about them (although I'm not denying that a zeal for knowledge is good). I just did a google search and found
http://www.musictheory.net/
I just skimmed through it and it seems pretty good to me, nice animations an seems to be fairly well explained. I've never used it myself though.

EDITZ: Why pay for books when you have a wealth of knowledge at your fingertips?
#8
You dont need modes for more interesting music.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#10
Listen to more music, 99% of it isnt modal.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#12
I try.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#13
And I did recommend a book, and a website.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#14
Quote by !!Dope Man!!

Basically, I know how a major scale is formed and the chords in it. Whoopy do, right.


Whoopy do wrong....you're already a considerable way down the road.... you're doing great..... my suggestion is to learn how and why those chords are related to the major scale.... to me it feels like the next step to take if I was in the same situation.... understanding chord construction definately helps understand and appreciate modes later...

I also agree with others that they aren't the be-all and end-all...
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#15
I recommend a book all the time which is not a theory book, but which will, in passing, teach you a lot of theory:

Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician, by Keith Wyatt and others. Great f'ing book.

He also has a book with the same co-authors called "Harmony and Theory." They go well together. There's a lot of theory in the ear training book, but it's not specifically about theory. The second book is a full course in basic theory, complete with exercises.

They work well together.

Until you've mastered all the material in those two books, modes are probably a waste of your time.
#17
the jazz theory book - mark levine

harmony - walter piston
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