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#81
Anyone have any tips for playing with cuts on your cuticles on your picking fingers? I work in a warehouse(where I cut myself on boxes everyday), so cuts on my cuticles are common, and often make it too painful to wear the picks.
#83
Quote by Rykoshet
The B9 looks good considering it is about $250, and I don't want to spend more than that on a beginner banjo, but I also don't want to order it off Amazon
Why not? Amazon is usually fine to do business with. You should absolutely stay from their, "Super Saver Shipping", with a big ticket item.

Musician's Friend ships many, many items to Canada, you might get lucky and your banjo might could be one of them....

Quote by Rykoshet
Any ideas. Also, would you recommend the B9? I don't know anything about 4 vs 5 string Banjos. If it helps, she wants to be like the guy from Mumford & Sons!
I know squat about the "B-9". That said, I'm fairly certain you don't want a 4 string, or "tenor" banjo. The 5th string high G string, is what gives the banjo its characteristic sound.

The tenor banjo is that most obnoxious of instruments the Philadelphia Mummers String Bands play. DON'T GO THERE......!

That s***'s bad enough once a year, you don't want it in the house with you year round....! I'm pretty sure they play the damned things solely to aggravate everybody's News Years Day hangover....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 16, 2012,
#84
Quote by W4RP1G
Anyone have any tips for playing with cuts on your cuticles on your picking fingers? I work in a warehouse(where I cut myself on boxes everyday), so cuts on my cuticles are common, and often make it too painful to wear the picks.


What if you tried bending the picks (the part that goes around your finger) so that they're a little bit wider (that way that you would if your fingers were bigger) and tried playing with gloves on? I'm not at all sure how that would work, but I figure it's at least worth a shot. And if gloves don't work, try just wrapping something around your fingers, like band aids or even just a bit of tissue. I've actually done that a couple of times (with tissues) and it seemed to work alright.
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#85
Yeah, I've tried those things. Sometimes they work, but sometimes it hurts. Anyone use superglue for stuff like that?
#86
Quote by W4RP1G
Yeah, I've tried those things. Sometimes they work, but sometimes it hurts. Anyone use superglue for stuff like that?

James Taylor gives a course on doing fake nails on Youtube. Basically it's just super glue and 3/4 fiberglass cloth (2 or 3 layers, or thereabouts). You can get them both in a hobby shop near you...

The only player I've seen successfully use them is Roger McGuinn on the 12 string.... He does it on his teaching DVD. For me, that seems like the hard way.

I suppose it would be how you use, or abuse, your nails in real life, if the crazy glue route would be right for you.

I think you could do a "frailing" style pretty well with "hybrid picking". At least that's how I would approach it at first. This assumes I spring for a banjo.
#87
Well for guitar when I get blisters on my fingers or small cuts I'll put a small layer of superglue over the area to keep it from ripping open. It actually works REALLY well as long as you are careful not to apply to much. It feels weird at first though.
#89
Learn to play Mountain Dew and then dress up like Grandpa.
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#90
I dressed up like a grandpa and forgot what a banjo was. Damn Alzheimer.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#91
In that case it's a good thing that I didn't tell you to dress up like Stringbean...
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#92
It's too bad this shit ain't more active. I was really disappointed that I had to take Stars and Satellites out of rotation, but alas, all good things must come to an end. I still give it regular airplay when I'm on at least. It's such a good album, despite the questionable morality of playing bluegrass banjo with a flat pick.
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#93
Quote by JustRooster
I've decided to start learning clawhammer today.

I got ok at it for a while, before I sold my banjo.

I went Thursday to buy a new one, but accidentally bought a Martin.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#94
Quote by theogonia777
It's too bad this shit ain't more active. I was really disappointed that I had to take Stars and Satellites out of rotation, but alas, all good things must come to an end. I still give it regular airplay when I'm on at least. It's such a good album, despite the questionable morality of playing bluegrass banjo with a flat pick.


For some reason I could never get into Stars & Satellites, I generally only find myself going back to Risk and Walt Whitman. It was nice change of pace from the break neck, balls to the wall Palomino, but I guess I just prefer the more agressive TBT sound. Blue Sky and the Devil will always be my favorite however, just classic
Last edited by Fly-By-Night at Sep 2, 2012,
#95
Actually, those two were the only recommended tracks anyway (actually I think that there was a third as well), so those are the only ones that other people ever played anyway.
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#96
So I had a rather disapointing trip the other day. While I have plenty of guitars I've wanted to find a good open back banjo for a while now(under $200 for now) and I had a lead from someone who had put one in a consignment shop. Sadly it was gone by time I got there(no more than an hour later!). Long story short I am still short a banjo!
#97
Epiphone makes a nice open back. I got one from GC a couple years ago for right around $150, if I remember right. I personally didn't like it (I like having a resonator), so I gave it to a family member as a gift. But yeah, if you've got $200, the Epi isn't a horrible way to go. Stayed in tune well, sounded good... was just awkward to play for me.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#98
That's what I bought, the entry-level open-back Epi. 150.00 from Musician's Friend.

Thing came with not one but two differnt inspection stickers telling me it had been gone over not only by some Chinese fellow but an American at the distributor.
They must have a lot of those stickers....
None of the tension hooks were tensioned properly... A couple were rattlingly loose. One of the nuts holding the tuning machine in place was finger-loose.
These are minor things; I had the thing tightened up and sounding good in a few minutes. However, an inexperienced player might have been frustrated by rattles and poor tone.

Still, a lot of banjo for the money. I'm mostly interested in clawhammer and folkie-style accompanyment, so an open-back is fine for me.
#99
I'll have to look at the Epi however I almost never buy instruments unless I know they are a fixer upper for repair experience without hearing them play and looking them over. My local music shop carries Fenders and Goodtimes by Deering. I was not impressed by the fenders however the open back Goodtime Parlor banjo was quite amazing. I'm hoping to find one used nearby. Anyone have experience with those?
#100
Quote by Bikewer
That's what I bought, the entry-level open-back Epi. 150.00 from Musician's Friend.

Thing came with not one but two differnt inspection stickers telling me it had been gone over not only by some Chinese fellow but an American at the distributor.
They must have a lot of those stickers....
None of the tension hooks were tensioned properly... A couple were rattlingly loose. One of the nuts holding the tuning machine in place was finger-loose.
These are minor things; I had the thing tightened up and sounding good in a few minutes. However, an inexperienced player might have been frustrated by rattles and poor tone.

Still, a lot of banjo for the money. I'm mostly interested in clawhammer and folkie-style accompanyment, so an open-back is fine for me.

I didn't have any of those issues, but I am not surprised at all that someone else did lol... A lot of Epi's need some sort of work out of the box, but sometimes you get a good one.

Quote by ^-^
I'll have to look at the Epi however I almost never buy instruments unless I know they are a fixer upper for repair experience without hearing them play and looking them over. My local music shop carries Fenders and Goodtimes by Deering. I was not impressed by the fenders however the open back Goodtime Parlor banjo was quite amazing. I'm hoping to find one used nearby. Anyone have experience with those?

Never used a Deering, but I have always liked the Fenders I've tried. Maybe my banjo tastes just aren't very refined? lol
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#101
Over at the dedicated banjo forums, like the "Hangout", the Deering "Goodtime" banjo is generally thought of as a really good beginner's instrument.
They have a fretless model out as well.
#103
Well you know what they say about fretless banjos: frets are just speed bumps anyway.
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#104
Not if you're me... the frets are those parking spaces surrounded by curbs, making it very difficult to miss. lol
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#105
Have any of you ever tried prepared banjo? There are a lot more possibilities for some things. A banjo head vibrates more than the body of a guitar of course, so there is more potential to put things on it. You can put a clothespin or other similar things on the bridge, and allow it to touch the body. It gives you a sound like a slightly overdriven guitar.
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#106
I finally got one! I am the proud owner of a new Parlor Goodtime Banjo by Deering! Been having fun playing clawhammer on it and doing some cool blues and folk things on it but soon I hope to learn to frail!
#107
Any of you guys ever try any sort of stuff like long neck, cello, or 10 string banjos?
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#108
Being as old as I am, I recall when the long-neck was quite popular, due largely to Pete Seeger who had one built.
His reasoning back then was that the slightly-lower pitched instrument suited his voice better, and was more suited to the keys he normally sang in.
They are still available, and the opinions as to their sounds vary wildly....
#109
It makes it a lot easier to play in stupid keys life F though, not like anyone plays in F. Guitarists love E though, so that's always nice. It sure beats the alternative of capoing the 4th fret and playing in C, at the very least.
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#110
Quote by theogonia777
It makes it a lot easier to play in stupid keys life F though, not like anyone plays in F. Guitarists love E though, so that's always nice. It sure beats the alternative of capoing the 4th fret and playing in C, at the very least.
That's because you don't have to play in F to be in F tuned to D standard, you play in G. Think, The Beatles, "Yesterday".

In the key of F in E standard, the normal approach is to play in D, and capo on 3.

To me this seems to be the reason more and more baritone guitars are making an appearance. Well, that and the metal children with their 7 strings.
#111
I didn't understand a single word of that.
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#112
Quote by theogonia777
I didn't understand a single word of that.

You do know how to make open chord shapes though, correct?

So, the open chords G, D, & C, are only are actually G, C, & D, when the guitar is tuned to E standard. These Notes, E, A, D, G, B, e.

Tuning the guitar down a whole note across the board results in these notes, D, G, C, F, A, d. This is called D standard tuning, or D to D standard tuning

So what happens when you play the G chord shape, it becomes an F chord, the D chord is a C, and finally, the C chord becomes Bb. So, you play with the shapes of G major chords, but you are playing in the key of F. The Beatles song, "Yesterday" is in F major, tuned down to D to D standard, and using G major chord shapes. McCartney likely can't hit the G above middle C in that context. So, they tune down a full step, and he sings an F instead. This is in the descending arpeggio, Oh, I believe in Yester--" Day, Ay, Ay, Ay".

So, a capo is not only used to simply change key, but also to allow you to use certain open chord shapes, in a different context.

As I said, quite often in country music, the rhythm guitar is capoed on the 3rd fret, and the shapes of D major open are used. (D, G, & A).

Part of the reason is vocal key of course, but another is to match the open strings, to the F neck of the steel guitar. (Double neck steels commonly have one neck tuned to C, the other to F as a chord).

Is that more coherent?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 5, 2012,
#113
Yeah, I guess. Except that that doesn't really have anything to do with playing banjo, and as a steeler myself, you generally tune to C6 and E9, and I'm pretty sure that neither of those is an F.
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#116
So today I talk off my resonator for the first time. It was highly anticlimactic. That being said, I'll probably try playing as an open back a few times because why not. Though I don't know how I would play it standing up since my strap goes through the brackets on the bottom (which is fine obviously) and the other side goes on one of the thumb screw (which is removed).

I also decided to make yet another attempt at getting into clawhammer. I came up with a simple arrangement for Whiskey in the Jar (I also submitted the tab). It's pretty cool.
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#117
After playing a used Deering Goodtime with a Shubb fifth string capo, I decided to finally get one (the capo). I'm finally playing more clawhammer so the pen cap capo won't cut it anymore, and honestly the fifth string capo was extremely unobtrusive when going up the neck, which was my big concern. It should come in on Tuesday.

Also I really want to get a scooped longneck openback so I can play in like F or something. I can't quite get that low E most of the time, but F is no problem.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Sep 8, 2013,
#118
Starting working at a guitar shop. We've got a selection of Martin, Yamaha, and Epiphone. For the good ol' grass all I've got is 2 Fender mandolins, 2 Gold Tone banjos, 1 Gold Tone banjitar, and 2 Dobros.

I'm the only guy out of 6 stores that plays any folk style stuff other than violin, so I'm gonna try and horde all of it and be pretty much the only good bluegrass retailer in the area. Hopefully it works out.

Side note, I should get a mandolin.
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#119
I want to start an alt country band that would be a mix of honky tonk, outlaw country, Bakerfield, western swing, bluegrass, etc and sludge, thrash, crust punk, grindcore, etc. I think it would be like:

-guitarist that plays a 7 string, knows how to use distortion, can play metal/hardcore rhythm, can play bluegrass rhythm, and knows cool chicken pickin' licks

-bass guitarist that plays a 5 strings, doesn't mind playing with a pick if needed, can gallop real fast, can walk, and doesn't mind playing with some real heavy fuzz,

-drummer would be more of a punk/hardcore/metal drummer that can do all the d-beats, blasting, double bass, etc that would be needed

-fiddle player

-I would play banjo, mandolin, and pedal steel, with the C6 neck (using the splat pedal) being able to be used with distortion for if the guitarist is playing a solo and so a second distorted guitar is needed (hence why a seven string in Drop A would be handy, since my three low strings would be AEA)
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#120
Quote by theogonia777
I want to start an alt country band that would be a mix of honky tonk, outlaw country, Bakerfield, western swing, bluegrass, etc and sludge, thrash, crust punk, grindcore, etc. I think it would be like:

-guitarist that plays a 7 string, knows how to use distortion, can play metal/hardcore rhythm, can play bluegrass rhythm, and knows cool chicken pickin' licks

-bass guitarist that plays a 5 strings, doesn't mind playing with a pick if needed, can gallop real fast, can walk, and doesn't mind playing with some real heavy fuzz,

-drummer would be more of a punk/hardcore/metal drummer that can do all the d-beats, blasting, double bass, etc that would be needed

-fiddle player

-I would play banjo, mandolin, and pedal steel, with the C6 neck (using the splat pedal) being able to be used with distortion for if the guitarist is playing a solo and so a second distorted guitar is needed (hence why a seven string in Drop A would be handy, since my three low strings would be AEA)
You wouldn't by any chance be considering the calling the band, "Flogging Molly" would you?

(Jus' kiddin').