#1
I played a wedding today, and we did a lot of tunes with extended improvisations on a single chord or tonality (fever and moondance). In the case of fever, the whole form is an Am with two bars of E7 in two specific places.

So what are some ways you have of adding interest to one chord vamps, and keep in mind this was a wedding, it's not really appropriate to go majorly outside of tonality otherwise people think your stuffing up.

So, after about 5 or so choruses, I'd pretty much reached the end of my bag. How about you?
#2
Quote by jesse music
I played a wedding today, and we did a lot of tunes with extended improvisations on a single chord or tonality (fever and moondance). In the case of fever, the whole form is an Am with two bars of E7 in two specific places.

So what are some ways you have of adding interest to one chord vamps, and keep in mind this was a wedding, it's not really appropriate to go majorly outside of tonality otherwise people think your stuffing up.

So, after about 5 or so choruses, I'd pretty much reached the end of my bag. How about you?


Perhaps you're thinking about guitar the wrong way. It's not a bag of tricks that you have to pull a different one out of every time, it's a musical instrument. You're allowed to repeat parts now and then if you wish.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Did you try improvising with chords? 4th stacks that is, diatonic to the chord scale/mode. You can create more unusual sounds rather than the standard tertian stuff that we're all so used to, and still sound "in".

Also, Fever is a static and slow moving progression, it gave you a lot of time to use pentatonic substitution.

If you wanted to go outside, you could, I mean you know about chord tones for sure, and also quote the melody to reassure the listener(s) they know where you're at.

If you were repeating a lot, you could've disguised them by displacing some notes within the phrase by an octave. Octave displacement is always a winner.

You could play the phrase in a low octave, and then repeat an octave higher by joining it up with a melodic line.

Did you listen to the snare? In Jazz, you can come up with rhythmic ideas from the drummer alone.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 19, 2011,
#6
^ E Phrygian Dominant

Jesse, over the E7 you could've tried a typical bopish idea of playing a dominant 7th arp a semitone higher, then side slipping back in.
-------
----
------8s7
--7-10---9p6
-8----------7
-----

Over Am you could side slip with the pentatonic.
-8p5---------6h9p6s5
----8p5---6h9
-------7s8
-
-
-