#1
I figure this forum's the most appropriate for this thread.


I've heard people refer to certain music as being "one-dimensional." I can't really figure out what this means. I understand if they're referring to, say, a guy singing shallow lyrics with a poor vocal range with just his acoustic to back him as being one-dimensional. Y'know, music that is superficial and not that "deep," if you will.
But a few weeks ago a buddy of mine deemed Tchaikovsky's music as one-dimensional. I really didn't understand his usage of the term, and in retrospect I should've asked him what he meant, but unfortunately I didn't. I was a bit stunned, tbh, as from what I gather the term has somewhat of a negative connotation.

Can anybody shed a more light on this term?
MATTERHORN
#3
Usually used by people who want to sound elitist.

There ARE appropriate times for it, like listening to a black metal musician who plays the same two notes for 1 hour straight. I'd say objectively that's as close to real one-dimensional as you get can.
Personally, I'd say the guy who said that to you is trolling.
It's spelled wiener.
#4
...he's deeming tchaikovsky's music as one-dimensional? wow, and i thought i was elitist...

when he becomes a celebrated composer you can listen to him. until then, treat him as you would your village idiot.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
...he's deeming tchaikovsky's music as one-dimensional? wow, and i thought i was elitist...


Lawls...

Yeah, I agree though, just ignore him. Although, I dont know what he means by one dimensional, he's probably an idiot. I don't actually know what anyone means by one dimensional...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#6
I've heard people call Tchaikovsky one-dimensional because he has a big knack for strong passion and the dramatic that he never seems to restrain. Some people find that somewhat childish.

From a theory standpoint I've also had people say that he refers too strongly on his melodies and sequences rather than having a pristine form and development the way German composers often do.
Last edited by Vlasco at Nov 20, 2011,
#7
Well, he is very elitist when it comes to classical (Baroque, Romantic, etc.) music – to the point where you can't have a discussion without it feeling like/turning into an argument.
And he definitely was not trolling lol.

Anyway,
Quote by Vlasco
I've heard people call Tchaikovsky one-dimensional because he has a big knack for strong passion and the dramatic that he never seems to restrain. Some people find that somewhat childish.

From a theory standpoint I've also had people say that he refers too strongly on his melodies and sequences rather than having a pristine form and development the way German composers often do.

Hm, I'm gonna have to spend some time thinking about this.


I mean, this isn't about defending Tchaikovsky or putting down my friend, but, I dunno.

It was just weird.
MATTERHORN
#8
It's pretty factual that he isn't a particularly versatile composer, but what he does he does damn well. I'm not sure that I would call the lack of versatility one-dimensional, however.
Last edited by Vlasco at Nov 20, 2011,