#1
Hey dudes, i just wanna know something. Im buying a guitar with a floyd rose trem and the strings that come on the guitar are 9s and i wont play those. Ill be adding on heavy ass gauge strings and will be tuning the guitar to C standard. Sooo i guess what im trying to say is, how simple with this be? Will i just have to take the old strings off, put the new ones on, stretchum a bit, tune them, then lock the nut back down and be all set to go? Or will i have to adjust all the fine tuners and spring and what not? Please help. Thanks!!!
#2
You'll have to touch at the springs in the back of the guitar to have you're trem lineup with your guitar body.

It'll take like 1h to do it I think for a beginner
#3
Take all the strings off and start from scratch. You'll need to re-adjust the bridge, springs in the back and most likely the truss rod as well. Basically everything. It's do-able with google and some common sense in an hour or two depending on how good you are, but everything after that is just maintenance. It's a healthy project to learn a thing or two about guitars.
#4
whaaat?
Why would you do that??
That would mess up the floy system, and the heavy guaged strings would never fit in the nut!
If you are tuning that low, you can just get a 7-string, that's meant for such tunings!
#5
Quote by JB95
whaaat?
Why would you do that??
That would mess up the floy system, and the heavy guaged strings would never fit in the nut!
If you are tuning that low, you can just get a 7-string, that's meant for such tunings!


I hate to break it for you, buddy. But that's absolutely not true.
#6
Quote by Nugma
I hate to break it for you, buddy. But that's absolutely not true.


Yea man, Nugma's right. Just look at black dahlia murder. They do it.
#7
Quote by Nugma
I hate to break it for you, buddy. But that's absolutely not true.

That depends on the guitar.
A friend of mine tuned down with his floyd rose guitar, and he had to send it to a music store... I know a guy who also had to mess with the nut to get the strings to fit.
I'd rather consider getting a 7-string for sound and range purposes, and not all pick-ups will work well with downtuned guitars.
My ibanez sound very bad in drop C (I' ll never tune that low again.)
#8
You're gonna cuss so much hahaha I know I did. I just ended up blocking the whole thing.
My sig? Nice.
#9
yea, i guess it sometimes depends, but the pickups im using will be seymour duncan mick thomson blackouts so im not in the least bit concerned about that. i just wanna try and do this floyd setup on my own if i cab. Theyre expensive nowadayys.
#10
As for the fine tuners, put them all at the middle height before you start with the rough tuning.

It'll also speed things up if you block the trem at the right height during the whole string change ordeal until they're all totally stretched and in tune. Then just adjust the claw until the blocks are loose (and the trem stays at the right angle with the right tuning).

You may or may not need to adjust the truss rod; the extra gauge might help make up for the lower tuning.

Whatever you do, do not adjust your action with the strings under tension--unless you want to replace the bridge. That's how knife edges wear out. Just undo the springs and pull the bridge out before spinning the posts.

C Standard is no big deal.
#11
People just need to learn to DIY with these Floyds. There's lots of help online. Don't take it to a music shop; it's very common for them to f up your knife blades.

I've also seen boneheads say they needed bigger springs for larger strings. BS. Shorter claw screws, yeah, but not bigger springs.

So yeah, if the existing claw screws bottom out before balancing the trem with the bigger strings, then get shorter screws from the hardware store. I had to do that with my Ibanez Xiphos.
#12
Quote by jetwash69
As for the fine tuners, put them all at the middle height before you start with the rough tuning.

It'll also speed things up if you block the trem at the right height during the whole string change ordeal until they're all totally stretched and in tune. Then just adjust the claw until the blocks are loose (and the trem stays at the right angle with the right tuning).

You may or may not need to adjust the truss rod; the extra gauge might help make up for the lower tuning.

Whatever you do, do not adjust your action with the strings under tension--unless you want to replace the bridge. That's how knife edges wear out. Just undo the springs and pull the bridge out before spinning the posts.

C Standard is no big deal.



Soooo, youre saying, put the tremblock in first, then unlock the nut and take out the old strings. Then put the new strings on, wind them around the pegs, and stretchum out a bit. After that, put the fine tuners in the middle position, and tune the guitar to pitch. Then, go into the backplate where the springs are and loosen it so that the bridge is parallel to the body. Finally, check the pitch again of the strings, and lock the nut down. Is that about right???
#13
Quote by JB95
whaaat?
Why would you do that??
That would mess up the floy system, and the heavy guaged strings would never fit in the nut!
If you are tuning that low, you can just get a 7-string, that's meant for such tunings!


You have no idea what you are talking about...


All you will need to do is add some springs to it and make the appropriate truss rod adjustments.
#14
Quote by DeathShredder23
Soooo, youre saying, put the tremblock in first, then unlock the nut and take out the old strings. Then put the new strings on, wind them around the pegs, and stretchum out a bit. After that, put the fine tuners in the middle position, and tune the guitar to pitch. Then, go into the backplate where the springs are and loosen it so that the bridge is parallel to the body. Finally, check the pitch again of the strings, and lock the nut down. Is that about right???


Close enough for the most part.

The big thing is you have to stretch the strings completely, not just "a bit".

I mean, stretch, tune to pitch, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, etc. until it doesn't lose pitch after the stretch at all.

Otherwise you won't have a stable bridge and you'll end up wanting to block it permanently like so many people do here.

If you do it right and set it up right, then you won't even lose a cent of tuning even if you whammy abuse all day for six months straight. If you don't stretch them enough, or set the right balance with the claw screws, then you'll think your Floyd Rose sucks, when the real problem is the string changer.

BTW, many FR-type trems won't let you put "extra" springs back there--several Ibanez models for sure only have 3 holes in the block for springs and the other 2 are for the spring retainer screws. I don't recommend leaving that off--much better to just use shorter claw screws or this: http://www.prorockgear.com/schalleradjustableclaw.aspx
#15
This is literally the first post in this forum. https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226

Skipped right past it, did you?

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#16
I didnt bother to read most of the other replies....some of the people on here really have no right to give advice on guitar-related matters. anyway, yeah you're gonna have to open up the back and adjust the screws attached to the strings until you can get it to balance out and stay in tune without bein locked down. then just lock it down and you're ready to shred. its not as difficult as it sounds, trust me
#17
everybody makes floyds seem so difficult. they are simple. put strings on i do it one by one in this order 6-1-5-2-4-3. always cross tune with a floyd (same pattern). watch you claw screws, don't be afraid to screw them in a little bit. just think of it as that each side needs even tension, the springs on one side and the strings on the other, you just need to balance it. after the strings are swapped, tune pull on every string a few times, tune,etc. then set your spring tension. if its a floyd i would assume locking nut, which will fit heavier strings fine. once everything is in tune (without the string clamps down) tune it one more time with all of your fine tuners somewhere in the middle with the sixth string more to the extreme so you can drop the 6th string if you want to clamp down. tune again. beat the living hell out of it and you will be fine. and i am sure that there are probably hundreds of videos on youtube demonstrating this.
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#18
Hopefully you won't have to do heavy adjustment since the lower tuning will help balance out the tension, but there's a good chance you'll have to adjust the springs in the back. You can't really know for sure until you do it, though, which is why I hate it when people go "oh you'll have to add a spring blah blah blah"
#19
Quote by Pac_man0123
Hopefully you won't have to do heavy adjustment since the lower tuning will help balance out the tension, but there's a good chance you'll have to adjust the springs in the back. You can't really know for sure until you do it, though, which is why I hate it when people go "oh you'll have to add a spring blah blah blah"


Plus, it's usually better to go with shorter claw screws than adding springs.